Analysis of the London ball-room

title page

  • Title: Analysis of the London ball-room : in which is comprised, The history of the polite art, from the earliest period, interspersed with characteristic observations on each of its popular divisions of country dances, which contain a selection of the most fashionable and popular; quadrilles, including Paine’s first set, and a selection from the operas of La gazza ladra, Il don Giovanni, Der freischutz, Pietro l’Eremita, and Il Tancredi; and waltzes: the whole, with the figures annexed to each, calculated for the use of domestic assemblies, and arranged for the piano-forte.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Thomas Tegg, 73, Cheapside, and R. Griffin and Co. Glasgow, 1825.

Catalog Record

74 825 An532

Acquired March 2020

The blessed effects of a united cabinet

description below

“George IV, seated on the throne, watches a display of jovial fraternization between John Bull and Pat, who dance, holding hands, each holding up a hat decorated respectively by rose and shamrock. A lanky garland of (thornless) roses and giant shamrocks drapes the crown on the back of the throne; one end is held up by Wellington (right), on the King’s left, the other by Peel on his right, so that the King is framed by it. J. B. is an obese and drink-blotched “cit”, with a snuff-box inscribed ‘Irish’ in his waistcoat pocket. Pat is a ragged Irish peasant, his bare legs swathed by twisted straw; his shillelagh lies on the ground; he looks with a broad but appraising grin at J. B., who sings: “Together reared together grown, Oh! let us now unite in one, Let friendship rivet the decree, Nor bigots sever Pat and Me!!!” Two discomfited ‘bigots’ depart on the left; one is a gouty parson using a crutch, with a ‘Petition against Concession’ hanging from his pocket, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15661, &c. The other is a Catholic bishop in robe and mitre. They say: ‘It’s time for us to be off.’ Above their heads flies a figure of Discord, her hair consisting of snakes which spit flame towards J. B. The King, with extended arm, says: ‘No more let Bigotry distract the Nation, Nor Priestcraft nurture lawless passion, Henceforth let rage and tumult cease, As brothers live and die in peace!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The blessed effects of a united cabinet, or, The glorious march of intellect [graphic] / T. Jones fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.17+

Acquired December 2020

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

group of people dancing

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others of the set: one man and two ladies on the left and one lady and two men on the right dance rigidly erect, and watch the central pair with hauteur; the men are dandies, the women slim and fashionable. The duchess has a swirling paradise-plume in her towering loops of hair, above tossing ringlets.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, May 1829.

Catalog Record 

829.05.00.08+

Acquired October 2018

The wedding day

“The fat, moustached, Duchess of St. Albans and the slim Duke dance with vigour and agility, each poised on the left toe, arms interlaced, and hands meeting above their heads. From the Duchess’s small coronet rise giant ostrich feathers which curve above the heads of both and above which a big ducal coronet is suspended. He sings: My Wife shall dance, And I will sing so merry we’ll pass this_ day. She: For I hold it one of the wisest things to drive dull care away–. The musicians are two cynical cupids; one (left) sits on large sacks of sovereigns inscribed Cash; coins pour from a slit in a sack and lie on the carpet with a banker’s money-scoop. He fiddles: Money in both pockets. The other (right), seated on the apex of a huge melon from which a slice has been cut, plays bagpipes: And auld Robin Gray [Coutts] was a gued Old Man to me! with variations.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, Henry, active 1824-1850, printmaker.
  • TitleThe wedding day [graphic] / H. Heath delt
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], published June 28, 1827.

Catalog Record 

827.06.28.01+

Acquired April 2017

The dance of the calumet of the sun

lwlpr34659-1024x730

Depiction of the dance probably performed by the Illinois to strengthen peace between the tribes. The Calumet, a large pipe, was usually presented to the honoured guest. The tribe surrounds the circle in which two men dance with arrows above their heads; the circle includes arrangements of bows and arrows and tomahawks.

  • TitleThe dance of the calumet of the sun, or pipe of peace, performed on the most solemn occasions by the Indian nations in North America [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pub. by T. Tegg, Jany. 21, 1809.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

809.01.21.01

Acquired July 2016

 

The flowing cann

lwlpr33262 (682x1024)

In two columns with the title in a ribbon atop a woodcut below stanza one. Stanzas 2 and 3 below image. A sailor at a seaside tavern (Jack Ocum) dances with a young woman as he holds his tankard. The fiddle music is played by a man who stands beside a woman in the tavern doorway. In the distance on the right is a sailing ship and along the shore, two men in a row boat.

  • Author: Dibdin, Charles, 1745-1814.
  • Uniform Title[Oddities. Song]
  • TitleThe flowing cann.
  • Published[London : Sold by J. Pitts, Great Saint Andrew St. ; Sold by C. Sheppard, Lambert Hill, Doctors Commons, Publish’d Septr. 18th. 1790?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

790.09.18.01

Acquired October 2015

 

This plate (representing a negroes dance in the island of Dominica)

lwlpr31673_M

A couple dance together under a lush tree with large fruit hanging from its branches. They are accompanied by two men playing instruments, a drum and tambourine as one woman claps along to the music. Others, including a small girl, stand and converse.

  • PrintmakerBrunias, Agostino, 1730-1796, printmaker, artist.
  • TitleThis plate (representing a negroes dance in the island of Dominica) is humbly dedicated to the Honble. Charles O’Hara, Brigadier General of His Majesty’s Army in America …. by his most obedt. & devoted servt.                 A. Brunias [graphic] / A. Brunias pinxt. et sculpt.
  • PublishedLondon : Published 15 Feby. 1779 by the proprietor N […] Broad Street, [15 February 1779]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

779.02.15.01

Acquired April 2014

A French family

Click for larger image

Two couples — one middle age and the other youthful — dance in a shabby room.

  • Printmaker: Alken, Samuel, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: A French family [graphic] / T. Rowlandson delin. ; S. Alken fecit.

Catalog record & Digital collection

792.11.05.04++

Acquired November 2012

Comic dance in the popular pantomime of The white cat

Click for larger image

“The clowns Kirby and Chatterley, one dressed in female costume, dancing.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Comic dance in the popular pantomime of The white cat [graphic] : by Messr. Kirby & Chatterley to the tune of The bold dragoon / draw [sic] & etched by W. Heath.
  • Published: [London] : Pub. 5th of Jany. 1812 by T. Palser, Bridge Road, Lambeth, [5 January 1812]

Catalog record & Digital collection

812.01.05.01+

Acquired November 2012

The last jig, or Adieu to Old England

Click for larger image

A scene in a tavern cellar, with a young woman, gaily dressed, dancing a jig with a man wearing an apron; at left, a sailor playing the violin, at right, a sailor sitting on steps and leaning forward, smoking, resting his arms on a barrel, another beside him holding a bowl, a young woman standing behind them with a hand on the shoulder of each; behind, three amorous couples, including a sailor sitting on another barrel.

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827.
  • Title: The last jig, or Adieu to Old England [graphic] / Rowlandson del.
  • Published: [London] : Publish’d January 20th, 1818 by Thos. Tegg, No. 111 Cheapside, [20 January 1818]

Catalog record & Digital collection

818.01.20.01+

Acquired November 2012