Farmer George’s wonderful monkey

description below

“Social satire; Pitt the Younger portrayed as a monkey, with regalia and his crown hanging on a chain around his neck, in a field labelled “Windsor Park”; below the image a text explains that this animal is confounding naturalists, who suppose it to be an offspring of the devil.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: O’Keeffe, W., active 1794-1805, printmaker.
  • Title: Farmer George’s wonderful monkey [graphic] / WOK [monogram]
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by J. Aitken, Castle Street, Leicester Fields, July 2nd, 1795.

Catalog Record

795.07.02.02+

Acquired November 2020

French volunteers marching to the conquest of Great Britain

description below

“A mounted officer with drawn sabre heads a procession of ‘Volunteers’ linked by a chain to his horse and to each other. The horse is a well-bred animal with handsome trappings, but the rider is lean and has torn breeches. He is followed by a file of three whose necks are attached to the horse and whose hands or arms are pinioned. All are miserable wretches, barelegged and ragged; the last, less abject, has sabots and takes snuff. He is chained to the neck of a donkey on whose back is a pannier containing three despairing conscripts. To the animal’s tail is tied a low truck on which a moribund shackled man lies on his back, his knees drawn up. To the truck is chained, in a stooping position, a man whose hands are tied behind his back, his nails being long talons. Birds, scenting carrion, fly towards the procession. Below the design: ‘Dedicated (by an Eye Witness) to the Volunteers of Great Britain’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: French volunteers marching to the conquest of Great Britain [graphic] / C.L.S.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Octr. 25th, 1803, by H. Humphrey, 27 St. Jamess [sic] Street, [25 October 1803]

Catalog Record

803.10.25.01++

Acquired March 2020

A North-ern ass

description below

“Satire on the election for County Durham, 14 April 1784: Sir Thomas Clavering and Sir John Upton, one headless, holding a caption labelled ‘The Irish Faction for ever’ and carrying the other, who has no feet, on his back, who says ‘I serv’d you as long as I could stand’ and carries captions lavelled ‘Coal owners Bill’ and ‘A command in India’; both seated on an ass facing left, which brays ‘Thus I go to Parliament and am not the first Ass that has farted for preferment, but this is dirty work and hard Labour’ and which has a collar labelled ‘I speak for my Master / Populus me sibilat at plaudo ipse domi’ and strips at the saddle labelled ‘Curse all Pitts / But a Coal-Pitt’; with the ass’ droppings falling on a crest with the motto ‘Diem Perdidi’; a mitre, crozier and sword and label ‘At rest’ on the ground in the centre, playing cards and papers labelled ‘Turnpike Speech / Election Speech’ to left; a milestone to right labelled ‘From Durham / T: C / J: E / 14 April 1784’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Hutchinson, W., active 1773-1784, printmaker.
  • Title: A North-ern ass [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1784]

Catalog Record

784.00.00.80

Acquired November 2020

The Westminster ceceder

description below

“Fox stoops to support on his back Horne Tooke, who is about to climb into the window of ‘St Stephe[n’s] Chap[el]’, the name on a slab over the door, partly cut off by the right margin. The door is being closed by Lord Temple, who says: “He shall not pollute this holy Temple”. Tooke rests his right foot on Fox’s back, his hands grasping the sill; his left toe is in a cranny in the wall above a placard headed: ‘Old Sarum Dilly takes only one at the Brazenface’. He looks down at Fox, saying, “don’t give way I am not quite in Yet”. Fox, his head towards the door, one foot supported on a book: ‘Powerfull Reasons for Non attendance’, says: “Come on with you!! and mind and button your great Coat to hide the Old Cassock.” Tooke’s greatcoat hangs open, showing his coat, and the skirt of a short cassock over knee-breeches. On the wall beside him is a torn placard: ‘A New Edition The Diversions of Purley by the Rev John H…’ The keystone of the arch over the door, on the extreme right, is a satyr’s head, leering at Tooke with protruding tongue.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The Westminster ceceder [sic] on fresh duty [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub’d. March 14, 1801 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [14 March 1801]

Catalog Record

801.03.14.02+

Acquired November 2020

Iohn Bull on a bed of roses

description below

“John Bull, a plebeian, stout and dishevelled, lies on his back on a tangle of large roses with vicious thorns. These are on a heap of stones and under the stump of a decayed oak tree (left). He exclaims: “Oh Lord! Oh Lord! if this be the Bed of Roses they make such a noise about I’d sooner lye with the Old Sow and her Farrow in the Dog Days! – My Dame will roar woundidly when she comes to bed! Ecod it’s as bad as lying on a Harrow upside down.” The stones (left to right) are ‘Expedition to Holland’ [1799, see British Museum Satires No. 9412, &c], ‘Expedition to Ferrol’, ‘Jobs and Contracts’, ‘Pension List’, ‘Indemnity for the past & Security for the Future’, ‘No Peace possible with the child and Champion of Jacobinism’, ‘Places’, ‘Subsidies’. The roses are: ‘Candle Tax’, ‘Hair Powder Tax’, ‘Hat Tax’, ‘Paper Tax’, ‘Snuff Tax’, ‘Game Tax’, ‘Wine Tax’, ‘Property Tax’, ‘Salt Tax’, ‘Land Tax’, ‘Stamp Tax’, ‘Assessed Taxes’, ‘Income Tax’, ‘Table Beer Tax’, ‘House Tax’, ‘Window Tax’, ‘Excise Duty’, ‘Horse Tax’, ‘Tobacco Tax’, ‘Soap Tax’, ‘Servant Tax’, ‘Malt Tax’, ‘Hop Tax’, ‘Sugar Tax’, ‘Legacy Tax’, ‘Tea Tax’, ‘Cyder Tax’. On the two extremities of the ‘bed’ are clusters of thorny buds; these are inscribed ‘1807’, ‘1808’, and [once] ‘1809’, those on the left being labelled ‘National Debt’. In the distance St. Paul’s is indicated. Bushes on the right are wind-swept.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Iohn Bull on a bed of roses [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. July 1806 by Wm. Holland, Cockspur Street, [July 1806]

Catalog Record

806.07.00.01+

Acquired November 2020

The library

description belowA scene in a fashionable library with ladies and gentlemen conversing with attendants at the counters on either side. On the left a woman looks in a book while her male companion converses with a clergyman, as the woman behind the counter consults a book. On the right, a man sits in a chair as a lady discusses her choices with the man behind the counter who reaches for a book below a sign ‘Stamp’. Behind him is another sign “Just published […]” An older woman with a walking stick approaches the counter on the right, followed by a Black servant and a dog. The windows are filled with books and prints. Through the open door a woman with an umbrella is silhouetted; to the left another sign “History Westminster and its monuments.”

 

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker.
  • Title: The library [graphic] / J. Green delt.
  • Publication: [London] : [R. Ackermann], [1813]

Catalog Record

813.00.00.24

Acquired November 2020

Evening, or, The man of feeling

description belowThree men sit by a supper-table, a grandfather-clock behind them points to XI. The man on the left is having his jack-boots pulled off by a small boy; the boy stands astride his right leg pulling hard, his back to the man, who is scowling and pushes his other booted foot against the boy’s back; on the floor are a pair of spurs, a pair of slippers, and a boot-jack. A man (right) wearing a night-cap, but otherwise completely dressed and wearing spurred boots, leans one elbow on the table, his face contorted as if in pain, he holds his hand to his thigh. On the table beside him is a small packet inscribed “Diaculum”. In the centre, and on the farther side of the table, the third man leans both elbows on the table, his hair is tousled and his eyes are shut. A servant behind, yawning, is carrying off a square box, probably a wig-box, while a maidservant stands on the right, a candle in one hand, a warming-pan in the other, watching with amusement the efforts of the boy to pull off the boot. Three hats hang on the wall; a bottle, a plate, three wine-glasses, and a guttering candle, burnt down to the socket, stand on the table. See related image in the British Museum catalogue.

 

  • Title: Evening, or, The man of feeling [graphic] / design’d by W.H. Bunbury Esqr.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1818]

Catalog Record

816.00.00.81+

Acquired November 2020

Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper

description below

A stout man reclines on a chaise-longue; a small cup meets his lips, from which he drinks wine. Above this, a small tube from which cracked nuts descend. On the wall are two wheels and the mechanism which pours and decants the wine, and cracks the nuts.

 

  • Title: Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper, for the heats of summer [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.08+

Acquired November 2020

A Portugal catch for three voices

description below

“Three men sit, singing a catch, with a round table between them. A British officer (perhaps Cotton), wearing a cocked hat, sits in profile to the right, facing Dalrymple who sits (right) with tightly closed mouth, his hands on his knees. Between them, but with his chair from Dalrymple, sits a man in Spanish (here Portuguese) dress, wearing a feathered hat. The British officer sings: T’was You Sir-Hew – Twas Hew. that let the French Escape, That makes you look so blue Sir-Hew Sir Hew! He and the Portuguese (perhaps Freire) point minatory hands at Dalrymple, whose face is painted lead colour. On the wall are two pictures: (above the Portuguese) ‘A correct representation of the French Plunderers stopt in their progress by the Spanish Patriots.’ [at Baylen] and (above Dalrymple): ‘A Correct representation of the French Plunderers quitting Portugal for France – under a British Escort.’ In one a long train of wagons is stopped by armed men, in the other are ships in full sail. On the table are glasses and decanters of ‘Port and Calcavella’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A Portugal catch for three voices [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Octr. 1808 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [October 1808]

Catalog Record

808.10.00.04+

Acquired November 2020

Mother Carey’s chickens

description below

“A stout and comely lady stands at the door of an ornamentally rustic cottage, shaking a cloth from which tiny officers leap out, holding money-bags. The cloth is inscribed in large letters ‘Pin Money instead of Allowance’. She says: “This is a profitable Plan of his and pays me a Devilish deal better than he can, besides the Patronage!!” Five elderly officers of normal size (right) watch their pigmy rivals with consternation. One looks through his glass, saying, “To waste ones health in unwholesome Climates an then fail of promotion because we cannot fee ****** or Army Agents Agents.!!” Another says: “Mother Careys Chickens by – then we shall have a storm indeed!” A third exclaims: “What to spend our lives in the service of our Country, and to be thus degraded by a parcel of Boys!!” He has a wooden leg and a patch over one eye. Another had lost his right arm, and the group seem hardly fit for active service. The ‘boys’ wear fashionable crescent-shaped cocked hats with plumes, the others old-fashioned hats with cockade, loop, and button. Over the door is inscribed in large letters ‘… mus Cottage’. It has the ornamental Gothic windows with leaded panes and thatched roof of fashionable rusticity. Beside it is a weeping willow. Below the title: ‘NB these Birds have lately been seen hovering about the Horse Guards’. Below the design: ‘a Storm Finch, or stormy petterel (the Mother Careys Chickens of the Sailors). Procellaria Pelagica of Linnœus. is seldom or never seen but in the great Ocean, and then when observed flying near a Ship, is the sure prognostication of a Storm, the analagy [sic] of effect has induced modern Naturalists to class these, with the Pelagica of Linnœus, tho differing in plumage’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Mother Carey’s chickens [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Novr. 1808 by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [November 1808]

Catalog Record

808.11.00.01+

Acquired June 2020