Dido in despair

Dido in despair. Detailed description below

“A parody of British Museum Satires No. 9752, Gillray’s ‘Dido in Despair!’ The Queen takes the place of Lady Hamilton, in a similar pose but tearing her long black hair with more of rage and less of grief. She wears a bracelet on each arm, one inscribed ‘BB’ (for Bergami), the other ‘MW’ (for Wood). On the floor are gifts to the Queen. Her bare right foot rests on a large cake inscribed ‘MW’ on which are various emblems: a large crown, which she kicks over, busts of Wood, Bergami, Lieut. Hownam, and an unidentified person; also a goat, an ass, and a cat. This stands on a paper: ‘Mr Trifle’s Love to the Q[ueen]’. A huge round of beef is ticketed ‘With Mr Suets Love to the Q–n’; with this is a roll of ‘Cat’s Meat’. A model of a pair of stays enclosed in a glass case stands on two papers: ‘Glass-blower’s Delight’ and ‘O stay my love my Cary dear’. A pair of breeches of metal is ‘For Bat [Bergami] or Cat ad libitum from the Brazier[s]’. Caricatures lie near a pair of slippers inscribed ‘BB’; the uppermost is of Bergami drinking at a table between Wood and the Queen. A book is ‘Catalogue of Fancy Men’. The glass on the dressing-table is topped by a crescent; on it hang miniatures of Bergami and Wood (cf. No. 13858). The table is covered with decanters, one labelled ‘Brandy’ [see British Museum Satires No. 14175], glass, pill-box, and boxes of ‘Rouge’, ‘Brick dust’, and ‘Court Plaister’. The curtains of the bed are fringed with gold and hang from a pelmet. In place of Gillray’s open sash-window is a closed French window; outside is a landscape, with two asses, and a lake (Como) with a sailing-boat.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: Dido in despair [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., April 3rd, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.04.03.01

Acquired March 2019

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue. Detailed description below

“A broadside satirising Robert Walpole with an etching in two parts. In the left-hand scene Frederick, Prince of Wales, stands with the Duke of Argyll and other gentlemen, pointing to the left where George II embraces Britannia. In the foreground, the grotesque figure of Walpole, wearing a coronet, kneels holding in five hands, bags of French and Spanish gold and another lettered, “I am Lord Corruption”. Behind him stands his daughter, Lady Mary, toying with a coronet. On the ground beside Walpole, the French cock perches on the back of the exhausted Imperial Eagle, but the British lion watching the conflict growls, “Now I’m rousing”. In the background, the white horse of Hanover kicks a man off a high rock; the man cries, “I’m lost”; a ship lies at anchor off Cartagena observed from another high rock to right by Admiral Vernon whose impetus towards the city is restrained by General Wentworth; below these two men sits Admiral Haddock chained to a rock (a reference to the limitation of his resources in dealing with the combined Spanish and French Mediterranean fleets). In the right-hand scene Walpole raises his hands in horror at the appearance in a cloud of smoke of the ghost of Eustace Budgell who holds out a paper described in the verses to left as a “black Account …Full twenty Winters of Misdeeds”; on the table at which Walpole is sitting is a large candlestick and letters addressed “A son Eminence” (Cardinal Fleury) and “à don [Sebastian] de la Quadra” and a book on “The Art of Bribery”. Budgell’s ghost raises his hand above his head to point at a scene of a beheading in the background above which flies Time while Justice sits on a column beside the scaffold and a crowd cheers below; over a doorway to right is a portrait of a Cardinal, presumably intended for Wolsey who is mentioned in the verses on the right. Engraved title and dedication to the Prince of Wales on a cloth above the scene supported by two putti; verses in two columns on either side condemning Walpole for his maladministration and celebrating the new prominence of the Prince of Wales and his followers; lines of music in two columns below the etching.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue [graphic] : most humbly inscrib’d to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales *see the Chinese Orphan, a tragedy for the reason of this term / designd by N.S. ; engrav’d by G.S.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Eliza Haywood at Fame in the Piazza, Covent Garden, and sold by the printsellers and pamphlet shops of London and Westminster, according to act of Parliament, [1742]

Catalog Record 

742.00.00.10++ Impression 2

Acquired January 2019

The hero’s return

The hero's return

“A scene in the Empress’s dressing-room. Marie Louise is horror-struck at the appearance of Napoleon who advances towards her in profile astride the back of a crawling Mameluke; he is held up by two other Mamelukes who support his arms and shoulders. He is terribly emaciated and appears moribund. He wears uniform; his legs, feet, and hands are swathed in bandages, his (former) ear and nose covered with black patches. The crawling Mameluke, presumably Roustan, holds out a bottle containing a pointed nose, and labelled ‘Le Nez de l’Empereur’. Immediately behind Napoleon and his three supporters are two kneeling Mamelukes, each reverently holding a tasselled cushion supporting a bottle; one being labelled ‘Les Doights [sic] de l’Empereur Napole . . .’, the other, ‘Les Oreilles de l’Empereur Napoleon’. Behind them (left) another Mameluke advances with a bottle labelled ‘Les Doights du pied de l Empereur Bon . . .’ The Mamelukes wear Turkish dress with turbans. Napoleon looks in tragic silence at his wife, who is seated in regal state but turns aside weeping with violent gestures of despair. A small terrestrial globe decorates her chair; her foot rests on a stool in the form of a flattened polar hemisphere on which the word ‘Brit[ain]’ is visible. Over her low-cut dress is an ermine-bordered robe clasped with a fleur-de-lis. She is supported by an emaciated court-lady, with a patched face, proffering a smelling-bottle, whose profile and a small crown show that she is one of Napoleon’s sisters; two other ladies, wearing crowns, stand behind the Empress, registering consternation. A less conspicuous lady weeps. On the Empress’s right kneels the Governess of the King of Rome, Mme de Montesquiou, holding the screaming child, and weeping noisily. He registers angry terror at the sight of his father; his little crown has fallen off. His features, though fore-shortened and distorted, resemble those of his father, cf. British Museum Satires No. 11719. He wears an ermine-trimmed robe over his childish tunic and breeches. Behind the Governess is a draped dressing-table, the drapery decorated by a large fleur-de-lis, and the toilet boxes ornamented with crowns. A terrified monkey climbs up the mirror, clutching at the crown which surmounts it, and looking over its shoulder at the shocking spectacle presented by the Emperor. On the extreme right a lap-dog stands on a cushion barking furiously at Napoleon. On the ground on the extreme left are two large round coffers, one inscribed ‘Coffre Pour la Bijoutère [sic] Russe’, the other expectantly open. Voluminous draperies on the left and right, supported on the right by a pillar add to the regal character of the room.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe hero’s return [graphic] / David pinxit ; etched by G. Cruikshank.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey, St. James’s St., Feby. 22d, 1813.

Catalog Record

813.02.22.01+

Acquired June 2018

The Corsican whipping top in full spin!!!

The Corsican whipping top in full spin!!!

“A (tricolour) top with the head of Napoleon spins, above the ground, savagely lashed by representatives of the Allies. His arms and his legs have already been severed from his body, now represented only by the madly spinning top. The most violently active is Blücher (left) stripped to the shirt, his coat and hat thrown on a drum on the extreme left, beside which lie his gloves and baton. Facing them is Wellington (right) equally effective, stern, but less savage. Full-face, and immediately behind the top is the Tsar, left hand on hip; his whip is inscribed ‘Knout’. Between him and Wellington is Schwarzenberg (or Francis I). Bernadotte stands rather behind, between Blücher and Alexander, both hands on his hips; he holds a whip but is an amused spectator. Behind (right) the future King of Holland, crowned and wearing a star, but dressed in the breeches and jacket of the Dutchman in English caricature, sits under a tree on a cask of ‘Hollands’. He watches delightedly, holding up one of Napoleon’s legs inscribed ‘United Netherlands’. The other leg, the thigh inscribed ‘Swisslad, the boot Italy, lies near Blücher. At Wellington’s feet is the right arm inscribed Spain & Portugal’; the left arm, inscribed ‘Germany’, is near Schwarzenberg. Napoleon’s orb and (broken) sceptre lie near him, with some of the feathers from the large hat which is still on his head; his horrified and shrieking profile faces Blücher. In the background (left) is a road along which a carriage drives off, drawn by four galloping horses. It contains tiny figures: Marie Louise, crowned and looking behind her, and the little King of Rome also crowned and waving a sceptre. Two soldiers are on the box, two others sit behind. In the air behind Bernadotte a demon flies off to the left, with Joseph Bonaparte clutching his barbed tail. The latter, his crown flying off, looks back horrified, exclaiming “O! My poor Brother Nap oh oh! O!”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title:T he Corsican whipping top in full spin!!! [graphic] / G.H. invt. ; G. Cruikshank fect.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 11th, 1814, by H. Humphrey, St. James’s Strt., [11 April 1814]

Catalog Record

814.04.11.01+

Acquired June 2018

English coronet auction by K-, P- & Co.

In a large room French aristocrats crowd across a table from Pitt who is taking money while handing a pen to the man opposite who holds a crown in his left arm as he throws coins toward Pitt’s grasping hand. Above Pitt stands George III behind podium, gavel in one hand and another crown extended toward one of the many bidders shouting comments and prices. The King calls out, “This is a lot, gentlemen, of superior brilliancy to the last. This, this raises you above your fellows in a very high degree indeed. I pity your distresses from my soul, what, what, what was that you were saying about jewels, Madames, too high. You may ride over the necks of half the nation with this upon your coach. You may get in debt as fast as you please and never pay. Mind that gentlemen, never pay.” The Queen walks up a ladder behind the King to retrieve more crowns from the shelves behind the King’s podium, turning her head to say, “Pay some attention to that Lady’s jewels, my love.”

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleEnglish coronet auction by K-, P- & Co., or, Comfort for the late French noblesse [graphic] / designed by Corruption ; executed by Avarice.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Willm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford Street, July 8, 1790.

Catalog Record 

790.07.08.01+

Acquired May 2017