Riding apparatus for timid horsemen

description below

An older gentleman is on horseback strapped into a contraption that limits the horses movement (as such, it won’t move above a trot pace), limits any jolting movements and also provides shade and cover through the attachment of an umbrella. In the left background, a horseman struggles to control his horse as a panicked lady watches on and his top hat flies off behind him. To the right a male onlooker peers through his monocle in awe of the timid horsemen’s contraption.

 

  • Title: Riding apparatus for timid horsemen [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.09+

Acquired November 2020

A North-ern ass

description below

“Satire on the election for County Durham, 14 April 1784: Sir Thomas Clavering and Sir John Upton, one headless, holding a caption labelled ‘The Irish Faction for ever’ and carrying the other, who has no feet, on his back, who says ‘I serv’d you as long as I could stand’ and carries captions lavelled ‘Coal owners Bill’ and ‘A command in India’; both seated on an ass facing left, which brays ‘Thus I go to Parliament and am not the first Ass that has farted for preferment, but this is dirty work and hard Labour’ and which has a collar labelled ‘I speak for my Master / Populus me sibilat at plaudo ipse domi’ and strips at the saddle labelled ‘Curse all Pitts / But a Coal-Pitt’; with the ass’ droppings falling on a crest with the motto ‘Diem Perdidi’; a mitre, crozier and sword and label ‘At rest’ on the ground in the centre, playing cards and papers labelled ‘Turnpike Speech / Election Speech’ to left; a milestone to right labelled ‘From Durham / T: C / J: E / 14 April 1784’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Hutchinson, W., active 1773-1784, printmaker.
  • Title: A North-ern ass [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1784]

Catalog Record

784.00.00.80

Acquired November 2020

Perusing the state papers

description text

“Napoleon, John Bull (a ‘cit’), a British general wearing a star, and the Duke of Portland sit in conference, each holding a large double paper covered with type or script. Napoleon sits on the left, pointing to the text of his paper and saying to his neighbour, “You see Mr Bull the case is simply this If you do so, I’ll do so!” John, much disconcerted, stares at the Emperor, exclaiming “O! O!” The general also looks at Napoleon, perturbed. Portland (right), who sits in an armchair facing the Emperor, with frank dismay says: “If he says O! O! I’m afraid t’is but so! so!”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Perusing the state papers, or, Sounding the opinions of John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], March 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.00.04+

Acquired November 2020

Salus populi suprema lex

description belowBroadside poem, with engraving above letterpress text.
Engraved at top left of image: June mid-day. Engaved at top right of image: Tide, low water at London Bridge.

 

  • Creator: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878.
  • Title: Salus populi suprema lex. … royal address of Cadwallader ap-Tudor ap-Edwards ap-Vaughan, Water-King of Southwark …
  • Published: London, S. Knight [1828]

Catalog Record

832.00.00.51++

Acquired November 2020

The vices of the gin shop

"Broadside with five wood-engravings, the largest in the centre showing the drunkard's coat of arms."--British Museum online catalogue.

Letterpress text with wood-engravings on either side of the title at head of sheet: on the left “Temperance and Happy Family” and on the right “Intemperance and Miserable Family”. Below the heading and on the upper half of the sheet, an explanation of a wood-engraving in the center entitled “The Drunkard’s Coat of Arms”. On the lower half of the sheet, a poem in four columns, surrounding another large central image of a drunken crowd, including a woman feeding her infant from a wine glass; the rowdy, celebrating in a room with a row of large barrels labeled “Holland, Brand[y], Rum, Old Tom, Cream of the Valley.”

 

  • Title: The vices of the gin shop, public house, and tavern dissected, or, The folly of dram drinking clearly exhibited.
  • Publication: [London] : J. Quick, [approximately 1833]

Catalog Record

833.00.00.16+

Acquired November 2020

New Theatre Royal, Covent-Garden

description below

A playbill

 

  • Title: New Theatre RoyalCoventGarden, this present Saturday, May 261810, will be acted Shakspeare’s historical play of King Henry the Eighth … : Cardinal Wolsey, Mr. Kemble … Cromwell, Mr. C. Kemble … Katharine, Queen of England, Mrs. Siddons … ; to which will be added (first time this season) the musical entertainment of The escapes; or, The water carrier …
  • Production: [London] : E. Macleish, printer, [1810]

Catalog Record

File 767 P69B C838 1810 5/26

Acquired November 2020

The corn bill, or, Iohn Bull and his hobby

description below

“Mr. and Mrs. Bull are in their breakfast parlour; she sits beside a table on which is a tray with coffee-pot, &c, he stands booted and spurred, impatient to set off. Through an open doorway (right) a groom is seen holding a saddle-horse. Behind are the houses of a London street. Mrs. Bull reads with dismay the ‘[M]orning Post’; she cries: “Here Mr Bull here’s the Speech of that fellow on the Corn Bill – You must stop and hear this – The Price of Corn is yet Far Below the Price which is universally allowed to be Necessary!!!! why we shall all be starved Mr Bull.” He shouts, with outstretched arms: “D——n the Corn Bill! I have not time to think of any thing till the Election is over. – why Liberty and Independence is at stak [sic] – What is Starving to that Mrs Bull!” Both are very fat, and evidently prosperous.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The corn bill, or, Iohn Bull and his hobby [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Augt. 20th, 1804, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [20 August 1804]

Catalog Record

804.08.20.03+

Acquired November 2020

The Westminster ceceder

description below

“Fox stoops to support on his back Horne Tooke, who is about to climb into the window of ‘St Stephe[n’s] Chap[el]’, the name on a slab over the door, partly cut off by the right margin. The door is being closed by Lord Temple, who says: “He shall not pollute this holy Temple”. Tooke rests his right foot on Fox’s back, his hands grasping the sill; his left toe is in a cranny in the wall above a placard headed: ‘Old Sarum Dilly takes only one at the Brazenface’. He looks down at Fox, saying, “don’t give way I am not quite in Yet”. Fox, his head towards the door, one foot supported on a book: ‘Powerfull Reasons for Non attendance’, says: “Come on with you!! and mind and button your great Coat to hide the Old Cassock.” Tooke’s greatcoat hangs open, showing his coat, and the skirt of a short cassock over knee-breeches. On the wall beside him is a torn placard: ‘A New Edition The Diversions of Purley by the Rev John H…’ The keystone of the arch over the door, on the extreme right, is a satyr’s head, leering at Tooke with protruding tongue.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The Westminster ceceder [sic] on fresh duty [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub’d. March 14, 1801 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [14 March 1801]

Catalog Record

801.03.14.02+

Acquired November 2020

Iohn Bull on a bed of roses

description below

“John Bull, a plebeian, stout and dishevelled, lies on his back on a tangle of large roses with vicious thorns. These are on a heap of stones and under the stump of a decayed oak tree (left). He exclaims: “Oh Lord! Oh Lord! if this be the Bed of Roses they make such a noise about I’d sooner lye with the Old Sow and her Farrow in the Dog Days! – My Dame will roar woundidly when she comes to bed! Ecod it’s as bad as lying on a Harrow upside down.” The stones (left to right) are ‘Expedition to Holland’ [1799, see British Museum Satires No. 9412, &c], ‘Expedition to Ferrol’, ‘Jobs and Contracts’, ‘Pension List’, ‘Indemnity for the past & Security for the Future’, ‘No Peace possible with the child and Champion of Jacobinism’, ‘Places’, ‘Subsidies’. The roses are: ‘Candle Tax’, ‘Hair Powder Tax’, ‘Hat Tax’, ‘Paper Tax’, ‘Snuff Tax’, ‘Game Tax’, ‘Wine Tax’, ‘Property Tax’, ‘Salt Tax’, ‘Land Tax’, ‘Stamp Tax’, ‘Assessed Taxes’, ‘Income Tax’, ‘Table Beer Tax’, ‘House Tax’, ‘Window Tax’, ‘Excise Duty’, ‘Horse Tax’, ‘Tobacco Tax’, ‘Soap Tax’, ‘Servant Tax’, ‘Malt Tax’, ‘Hop Tax’, ‘Sugar Tax’, ‘Legacy Tax’, ‘Tea Tax’, ‘Cyder Tax’. On the two extremities of the ‘bed’ are clusters of thorny buds; these are inscribed ‘1807’, ‘1808’, and [once] ‘1809’, those on the left being labelled ‘National Debt’. In the distance St. Paul’s is indicated. Bushes on the right are wind-swept.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Iohn Bull on a bed of roses [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. July 1806 by Wm. Holland, Cockspur Street, [July 1806]

Catalog Record

806.07.00.01+

Acquired November 2020