[Laestrygonians]

description belowA small print depicting a scene from Homer’s Odyssey as he sails back to his home in Ithaca: Two Laestrygonian, who are giants, one who upends one Odysseus’s ships as other eats one of the men as the fail into the sea. The high cliffs of Lamos is in the distance on the right.

  • Title: [Laestrygonians] [graphic].
  • Publication: [England?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1800?]

Catalog Record

800.00.00.105

Acquired November 2020

Farmer George’s wonderful monkey

description below

“Social satire; Pitt the Younger portrayed as a monkey, with regalia and his crown hanging on a chain around his neck, in a field labelled “Windsor Park”; below the image a text explains that this animal is confounding naturalists, who suppose it to be an offspring of the devil.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: O’Keeffe, W., active 1794-1805, printmaker.
  • Title: Farmer George’s wonderful monkey [graphic] / WOK [monogram]
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by J. Aitken, Castle Street, Leicester Fields, July 2nd, 1795.

Catalog Record

795.07.02.02+

Acquired November 2020

Spectres visiting Iohn Bull

description below

“John Bull, a fat ‘cit’, is seated beside a writing-table (right) holding up a large book. On the left hand page is inscribed ‘Vote of Thanks respecting the Expedition to Copenhagen’; John’s pen rests on the last word, but he turns in horror to gaze at the ghosts of (left to right) Fox, Pitt, and Burke. These wear shrouds and stand on clouds; all point a menacing forefinger. Fox says: “Erase those lines from your Journal”; Pitt and Burke say “Erase”. Burke wears spectacles and a Jesuit’s biretta (cf. British Museum Satires No. 6026), and holds a large book inscribed ‘Sublime & Beautiful’ [cf., e.g., British Museum Satires No. 6361]. John wears glasses, his hair rises on his head, pushing up his ill-fitting wig. He says: “Why dont you come then and transact the business yourselves? – it is impossible I can please every body. – it is come to such a pitch now that I have no peace either with the living or the dead!!!””–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Spectres visiting Iohn Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Feby. 23, 1808, by Walker, No. 7 Cornhill, [23 February 1808]

Catalog Record

808.02.23.01+

Acquired November 2020

The accomplish’d female instructor

printed text

  • Title: The accomplish’d female instructor, or, A very useful companion for ladies, gentlewomen, and others : In two parts. Part I. Treating of generous breeding and behaviour; choice of company, friendship; the art of speaking well [etc.]…Part II. Treating of making curious confectionaries, or sweet-meats, jellies, syrups, cordial-waters…to know good provisions, dye curious colours, whiten ivory…physical and chyrurgical receipts…and a great number of other useful and profitable things.
  • Published: London : J. Knapton, 1704.

Catalog Record

659 704Ac

Acquired November 2020

Riding apparatus for timid horsemen

description below

An older gentleman is on horseback strapped into a contraption that limits the horses movement (as such, it won’t move above a trot pace), limits any jolting movements and also provides shade and cover through the attachment of an umbrella. In the left background, a horseman struggles to control his horse as a panicked lady watches on and his top hat flies off behind him. To the right a male onlooker peers through his monocle in awe of the timid horsemen’s contraption.

 

  • Title: Riding apparatus for timid horsemen [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.09+

Acquired November 2020

A North-ern ass

description below

“Satire on the election for County Durham, 14 April 1784: Sir Thomas Clavering and Sir John Upton, one headless, holding a caption labelled ‘The Irish Faction for ever’ and carrying the other, who has no feet, on his back, who says ‘I serv’d you as long as I could stand’ and carries captions lavelled ‘Coal owners Bill’ and ‘A command in India’; both seated on an ass facing left, which brays ‘Thus I go to Parliament and am not the first Ass that has farted for preferment, but this is dirty work and hard Labour’ and which has a collar labelled ‘I speak for my Master / Populus me sibilat at plaudo ipse domi’ and strips at the saddle labelled ‘Curse all Pitts / But a Coal-Pitt’; with the ass’ droppings falling on a crest with the motto ‘Diem Perdidi’; a mitre, crozier and sword and label ‘At rest’ on the ground in the centre, playing cards and papers labelled ‘Turnpike Speech / Election Speech’ to left; a milestone to right labelled ‘From Durham / T: C / J: E / 14 April 1784’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Hutchinson, W., active 1773-1784, printmaker.
  • Title: A North-ern ass [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1784]

Catalog Record

784.00.00.80

Acquired November 2020

Perusing the state papers

description text

“Napoleon, John Bull (a ‘cit’), a British general wearing a star, and the Duke of Portland sit in conference, each holding a large double paper covered with type or script. Napoleon sits on the left, pointing to the text of his paper and saying to his neighbour, “You see Mr Bull the case is simply this If you do so, I’ll do so!” John, much disconcerted, stares at the Emperor, exclaiming “O! O!” The general also looks at Napoleon, perturbed. Portland (right), who sits in an armchair facing the Emperor, with frank dismay says: “If he says O! O! I’m afraid t’is but so! so!”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Perusing the state papers, or, Sounding the opinions of John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], March 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.00.04+

Acquired November 2020

Salus populi suprema lex

description belowBroadside poem, with engraving above letterpress text.
Engraved at top left of image: June mid-day. Engaved at top right of image: Tide, low water at London Bridge.

 

  • Creator: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878.
  • Title: Salus populi suprema lex. … royal address of Cadwallader ap-Tudor ap-Edwards ap-Vaughan, Water-King of Southwark …
  • Published: London, S. Knight [1828]

Catalog Record

832.00.00.51++

Acquired November 2020

The vices of the gin shop

"Broadside with five wood-engravings, the largest in the centre showing the drunkard's coat of arms."--British Museum online catalogue.

Letterpress text with wood-engravings on either side of the title at head of sheet: on the left “Temperance and Happy Family” and on the right “Intemperance and Miserable Family”. Below the heading and on the upper half of the sheet, an explanation of a wood-engraving in the center entitled “The Drunkard’s Coat of Arms”. On the lower half of the sheet, a poem in four columns, surrounding another large central image of a drunken crowd, including a woman feeding her infant from a wine glass; the rowdy, celebrating in a room with a row of large barrels labeled “Holland, Brand[y], Rum, Old Tom, Cream of the Valley.”

 

  • Title: The vices of the gin shop, public house, and tavern dissected, or, The folly of dram drinking clearly exhibited.
  • Publication: [London] : J. Quick, [approximately 1833]

Catalog Record

833.00.00.16+

Acquired November 2020