Covetousness

description below

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by a cherub whose faces are turned away; the table is covered with coins. The prose text below is captioned “Covetousness” and consists of seven lines beginning: “Every step that a man makes beyond a moderate & reasonable Provision, is taking so much from the worthiness of his own spirit. …” This quote is taken from an popular 18th-century British courtesy book that appeared in many editions but was first published in 1715.: The Gentleman’s Library, containing rules for conduct in all parts of life. The scribe writes using Gothic lettering in pen and brown ink and decorates the perimeter of the the text and image with billowing flourishes. Printed above in a ribbon banner is a saying from Horace, “certum voto pete finem”–“set a definite limit to your desire.” On the verso written in pencil by a contemporary hand : Mind the noblest, he the law of Kings The noble mind distinguishes perfection It aids & strengthens virtue where it meets her ‘Tis not to be sported with.

  • Artist: Castle, William, active 1785, artist.
  • Title: Covetousness : manuscript / Wm. Castle.
  • Production: England, 1785.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss File 152+

Acquired June 2020

The itinerant chancellor

description belowA copy of the caricature of the British Statesman and High Lord Chancellor Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778-1868), that appeared in the center of an print that was published on 1 October 1834 in Every body’s album & caricature magazine, no. 19. He is depicted as a very thin traveller wearing a Scottish tam over his wig and using a broom as a walking stick; his shoe is worn through. He carries a wooden post labelled “Scratching post”, a box stamped “Containing the freedoms of all the Scotch towns” and a bag with the words “Broken victuals the leavings of the Edinburgh blow out”. Around his waist is another bag, “Oat meal”. Above the image framed in lines in gold ink: “I flatter myself I’ve made a tolerable good job by my “Starring it” with Old Grey in the North! Sold all my numbers of the Penny Magazine, and well puff’d it through every town I went. Made little less than one hundred speeches about, I forget now, Received some score of Burgesses, Freedoms, and Invitations to as many dinners, where I blew my own trumpet & obtained plenty of orders from our Usefull Knowledge Society! Now, woe to the unstamn’d when I get home! I must have a good scrub at my skin presently; I reckon I have got a taste of the fiddle through my itch for travelling!

  • Creator: M., M. S., artist.
  • Title: The itinerant chancellor [art original] / M.S.M. pinxt. March 39.
  • Production: [England], [March 1839]

Catalog Record

Drawings M999 no. 1 Box D205

Acquired December 2019

Simptoms of courage!

see description below

“British troops are about to march through a large fortified gate leading from open country (left) to the town of Buenos Ayres, where confused street-fighting is in progress. Can are fired from the battlements of the gate at the soldiers, some of whom lie dead or wounded. In the foreground an officer (mounted), in conversation with others, asks: “where is the General”; others say: “go look for the General”; “Find the General”; “why the General is lost”. A Highland officer, taking snuff (right), slyly; “I dare say he is varra safe.” From the country (left) three mounted men gallop, all saying, “I come for Orders”. In the background Whitelocke’s head and shoulders are seen peeping over a hillock on the extreme left. He says: “He that fights and runs away, May live to fight another day, But he thats in the Battle slain, Will never live to fight again”. In the distance, behind him, are tiny (British) soldiers in close formation. In the city men are firing and hurling stones from the roofs of flat-roofed houses on British soldiers in the plaza. On the wall (right) is a placard: ‘Lost, or Mis-led a General officer Who ever can [give] Information … ampl[y] rewarded.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Simptoms of courage! [graphic] / G. Whiteliver del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, March 26, 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.26.01+

Acquired June 2019

Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph

Cary Brunswick o' the Guelph. Detailed description below

“Heading to a broadside engraved in two columns. A stalwart Highland soldier, with plumed bonnet, stands outside an open doorway (left) crowded with cringing Italians. He lunges furiously towards them with clenched fist, saying: “Filthy brutes! i ‘ts for new boots, That a’ you Rogues are swearing at her”. The most prominent of the witnesses (cf. British Museum Satires No. 13762) are Majocchi (see British Museum Satires No. 13827) and Demont, see British Museum Satires No. 13856. Over the doorway: ‘Rogues Retreat’; at the corner of the building: ‘Cotton Garden’ [see British Museum Satires No. 13824]. Behind (right) is the Thames. The Highlander’s words are from the second verse of the song: ‘Air Tibby Fowler o’ the Glen’. The third of five verses: ‘Fie upon the filthy louns! There’s o’er mony swearing at her; Fifteen came frae German towns; There’s eight and fifty swearing at her; Swearing at her, mumbling at her, Tumbling at her, canna hit her; Tawdry louns! its for new gowns, The hizzies a’ are swearing at her.’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [September 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.09.00.01+

Acquired May 2019

Irish M.P.’s

Irish M.P.'s. Detailed description below.

An Irish schoolmaster-priest, sits in a chair taking a pinch of snuff from an open snuff box as he catechizes a dwarfish Irish peasant, ragged and barelegged, who answers with a sly grin: ‘O’C — for O’Connell thats right–now Pat what does MP stand for eh?’ Answer: ‘Mealy Potato’. On the table to the right is a crucifix used to prop open a book. Cf. British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Irish M.P.’s [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.112+

Acquired October 2018

A Welch peasantry

title page. Additional description below

A series of ten prints showing the Welsh men, women and children in a variety of settings, mostly in rural landscapes with trees and wooden fences.

  • Author: Taylor, T. (Thomas), active 1804.
  • Title: A Welch peasantry / sketched from life by T. Taylor.
  • Published: [London] : Pubd. May 1, 1804, by Laurie & Whittle, 53, Fleet Street, London, [1 May 1804]

Catalog Record 

724 804T

Acquired September 2018

Knock and ye shall enter

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“An archaic iron-studded door, with posts and lintel of solid but ancient oak, represents the door of the ‘COMMONS’ [inscription on lintel]. Above: ‘”They of Rome are enter’d in our Counsels Sh.’ [‘Coriolanus’, I. ii]. An old-clothes’ man stands at the door in profile to the left gazing up at the inscription; he raises the knocker, a ring in the mouth of an angry lion’s head. He is bearded, with an ultra-Jewish profile, and has three hats piled on his own, the topmost being a flaunting feminine erection. He wears a ragged and patched gaberdine, old-fashioned buckled shoes, and carries across his shoulder a large bag, from a hole in which projects a pig’s foot (a pig in his poke). On his back is an open box of trinkets, containing watches. Close behind him stands a turbaned Turk, watching him with eager anxiety. The Jew: ‘Come I sha–Open the door vill ye–I vants to come in–and heres a shentlemans a friend of mines–vants to come in too–dont be afeard–I dont vant a sheat for nothing–I can pay for it So help me Got.’ Three men (safely inside) look down at the applicants from a small open window beside the door (right): a dissenter, holding his hat, and characterized by lank hair and plebeian features (resembling Liston as Maw-Worm, cf. British Museum Satires No. 16943); a Jesuit wearing a biretta, and putting a thumb to his nose, and a fat elderly monk; the last two frown. The left door-post (somewhat cracked) is inscribed: ‘OAK Suppose to be sound Put up 1688 only latly discovered to be full of Skakes[?peare].'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Knock and ye shall enter [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Eq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [ca. June 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.06.00.01+

Acquired October 2018

Iohn Bull peeping into futurity

Iohn Bull peeping into futurity

John Bull kneels beside a young gentlemen in a red cloak holding a magnifying glass and a stick, looking towards a cloud within which the future is foretold. It depicts John Bull in seven different scenarios: drinking unadulterated porter, free from taxes, smoking Trinidad tobacco, talking French & grown quite a fine gentleman, eating cinnamon from Ceylon, free from care, and with bread at 6d the quarter loaf. John Bull says: ‘what be all those people I see. Mercy on us so many good things will be more than I can bear’. His companion replies: ‘Look through this glass Mr. Bull & behold your future prosperity, it magnifies but very little I assure you’.

  • PrintmakerRoberts, Piercy, active 1791-1805, printmaker.
  • TitleIohn Bull peeping into futurity [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etch’d by Roberts.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by P. Roberts, 28 Middle Row, Holborn, [between 1801 and 1803?]

Catalog Record

801.00.00.23

Acquired May 2018

A North Country transfer

A North Country transfer

“Trotter walks off from the Bank of England with two sacks under his arm, one inscribed ‘I[ciphers obscured]000 Newland, appearing in the doorway (left), hurries after him, saying, “Hollo sir – where are you going with those bags!” On the opposite side of the street is a pawnshop where Melville, in bonnet and plaid, looks out over its half-door. Trotter answers: “I am only trotting over with them to Johnny Mac Crees Banking House!” Melville says: “Hoot awa mon! – dinna be afraid – they will be as safe with me as in your ain Strong box.” On the pawnshop door are the words ‘Money Lent’ and the three balls or pawnbroker’s sign.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • TitleA North Country transfer, or, Abraham Newland alarm’d [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 5, 1805, by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, [5 April 1805]

Catalog Record

805.04.05.01

Acquired May 2018

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

“Three allied generals (left) hold the long handle of a shovel (peel) on which is a dish containing a tiny Napoleon. This they try to push into a baker’s oven, but are hindered by the Austrian emperor, who holds the door of the oven, feigning to be trying to open it, but actually holding it at an angle which prevents the entry of the dish. The leading baker is Blücher, wearing an apron over his uniform, and without a hat; he looks sternly at Francis, saying, “Pull away Frank! you Keep us waiting!” General Mikhail Woronzoff, young and handsome, immediately behind Blücher, pushes hard, saying, “In with it Blücher.” On the extreme left is Bernadotte, one hand on Woronzoff’s shoulder, saying, “I tell you what, Woronzow, the Hinges want a little Russia Oil.” Francis I, who like the others wears uniform with jack-boots, but has (baker’s) over-sleeves to the elbow, says with an expression of startled alarm: “This door Sticks! I dont think I shall get it open?!” A weathercock surmounts his cocked hat. Wellington comes up (right), poking him in the back with his baker’s tray on which are two pies. He says: “Shove alltogather [sic] Gentlemen! D-me shove door & all in!” His two pies are ‘Soult Pie’, with two spurred jack-booted legs projecting through the crust, and a pie with spires and other buildings, with a flag inscribed ‘Bourdeaux’. He wears an apron and the order of the Golden Fleece as well as the star of the Garter. A fat, grotesque Dutchman sits on a flat cushion gazing up at the oven; he holds, but does not use, a pair of bellows. In his conical hat is a tobacco-pipe. The fire under the oven is filled with broken eagles and fragments of weapons. Among the debris in the recess for ashes is a crown. Above the oven is the inscription ‘Allied Oven’ surmounted by a crown and cross-bones. In the shadow formed by the half-open door, a skull (Death) waits to receive Napoleon, who lies on his back, kicking violently, and shouting “Murder! Murder!!”; he wears a large plumed bicorne. The stone wall in which the oven is built forms the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole [graphic] / G.H. ivt. ; Gruikshank [sic] fect.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 1st, 1814, by H. Humphrey, St. James St., [1 April 1814]

Catalog Record 

814.04.01.02+

Acquired June 2018