The old proprietors advice

description below

“Prince Leopold (right), in uniform, puts his head through a glassless aperture in a window in the door of his ‘Grecian Establish[ment]–Co[burg]’, to look intently at a fat Turk who stands in profile to the right, elaborately dressed and holding a long pipe with smoking bowl. The door, partly cut off by the right margin, is flanked by a Corinthian pillar and set in a wall on which are placards: ‘This . Shop!!! will shortly open under entire new Management–Vivant [sic] Rex’; a Union Jack poster (partly covered); the Russian eagle, and a fleur-de-lis, the two last inscribed ‘Loan’. The Turk: ‘What have you taken the Shop? well if you take my advice you will not give Your Customers too much Credit for I can tell you they are a queer set to deal with by the bye they nearly ruined me–and mind that you look sharp after your Shopmen’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The old proprietors advice [graphic] / William Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. April 10, 1830, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [10 April 1830]

Catalog Record

830.04.10.01+

Acquired November 2020

A comfortable thing to be king of Greece

description below

“Prince Leopold sits enthroned, flanked by his new subjects; he wears uniform with a crown, and sits on a two-tiered circular dais in a chair of state, the seat of which is covered with giant thorns. Punctured and frightened, he grasps the arms of his chair with crisped fingers; his toes are drawn back, touching the ground, and he looks towards a savage-looking Greek (right) who kneels before him with a long knife held behind his back. A similar ruffian kneels on the left; others approach menacingly from the left, one smoking a long pipe and grasping a knife. They wear Greek costume with embroidered jackets and full white breeches. On the right are long-robed ecclesiastics, headed by a bearded patriarch with a cross in one hand, a knife in the other.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A comfortable thing to be king of Greece [graphic] / W. Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 6, 1830 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [6 March 1830]

Catalog Record

830.03.06.01+

Acquired November 2020

A phantasmagoria, or, A review of old times

see description below

“A magician stands full face with uplifted sabre held over the heads of two figures from the past whom he has called up, and who stand within a magic circle. He displays them to their modern descendants, a tall stout Frenchman plainly dressed, wearing cocked hat and military boots, who stands with his arm on the shoulder of a thin, wretched, shambling, Englishman, small, ugly, and foppish, his hand thrust through an empty pocket. The magician has a beard, but features, cocked hat, consular dress, and sabre indicate Napoleon. He asks: “Are you satisfied Gentlemen?” The apparitions (left) are a grossly obese Englishman in old-fashioned dress, a cane hanging from his right wrist, and an ugly, tall, cadaverous, and foppish Frenchman holding a snuffbox. They say, respectively: “Is that my Grandson Jack? what a skeleton!!!”; “Ah mon Cousin, vat you eat de Beef & Plum Pudding!!” Their surprised successors exclaim: “Bless me! why I am a mere Stump of a man to him!!! and viable my Cousin look like de Frog & John Bull look like de Ox but Grace a Dieu times are Changed!!” Beside the magician are symbols of his art: a globe, a crocodile, a scroll, a skull. Within the circle and beside the French apparition is a frog.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: A phantasmagoria, or, A review of old times [graphic] / I. Ck.
  • Publication: London : Pub. by T. Williamson, N. 20 Strand, London, March 9th, 1803.

Catalog Record

803.03.09.01+

Acquired March 2021

Going to court he’s arrested at St. James’s Gate

description below

“Piracy of plate IV of Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress with considerable differences: a scene in St James’s Street with the Rake (here named Ramble) emerging from a sedan-chair to be arrested for debt; figures in the foreground include a Welshman, probably the creditor, honouring St David’s day (March 1st) with a leek in his hat, “Nanny” offering a handful of money to reprieve her former lover, and a lamp-lighter carelessly spilling oil on the Rake’s coat; in the distance to left, a group of street-boys point to “Taffy”, a mannikin, perched on a lamp-post, and beyond the gate of St James’s Palace.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Bowles, Thomas, -1767, printmaker.
  • Title: Going to court he’s arrested at St. James’s Gate [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [John Bowles], [1735]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 735.00.00.20+ Box 200

Acquired January 2021

The faith of treaties exemplified

description below

“A huge bull, snorting fire, rushes with lowered head towards a French fort (left) from which cannon-balls descend upon him. Beneath the fort sansculottes on one knee fire at the bull while standing French soldiers, correctly dressed, also fire. On the fortress stand Frenchmen, firing and waving their hats; they shout: “Vive la republic, Blood & plunder, no Quarter to John Bull!” A huge tricolour flag has a staff surmounted by a skull. To the bull’s back is strapped a bundle inscribed ‘Debt Debt’. One horn has been shot off and lies on the ground. To his left hind leg is chained a heavy weight inscribed ‘Subsidies’. Nevertheless, he cries: “Now my brave Allies let us all stand firm together & make a bold push, & I’ll be Answerable for the Event.” But behind him (right) his allies have all turned their backs and are departing in directions indicated by signposts. A fat Dutchman smoking a pipe goes ‘To Amsterdam’, saying, “I care not who beats, I’ll join the Strongest Party”. Frederick William II (father-in-law of the Duke of York) walks off ‘To Berlin’, saying, “I’ve fingerd the Cash from both Sides, & will now employ it to Secure the Partition of Poland”; “Negociate with Robertspierre privately & then – Damn Relationship!!!” Next, a Spanish don, Charles IV, goes ‘To Madrid’, saying, “Whats the Bourbon Family to me when they Impede my Interest. Hush!! I am now treating for a Separate peace with that Blackguard Roberspere to Secure my own Crown – I must enlarge the Powers of the Inquisition”. On the extreme right Francis II and Mack in a two-wheeled gig, on which is the Habsburg eagle, are driving off ‘To Vienna’. The Emperor says: “Well Mack we have made a Glorious Campaign of it; of what use are the Low Countries without they continue to fill my Coffers? As for John Bull, let him settle the business as he can he loves to be meddling”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: The faith of treaties exemplified, or, John Bulls last effort to oblige his false friends [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. July 17, 1794, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, [17 July 1794]

Catalog Record

794.07.17.01+

Acquired January 2021

O’ the roast beef of old England…

description below

Engraving of William Hogarth’s 1748 painting ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England’ (London, Tate Britain), which he had himself published as a print. The scene is set at the Gate of Calais (after the painting in the Tate Gallery) with a fat monk prodding a large sirloin of beef carried by a cook, on either side are two French soldiers, one of whom spills his bowl of thin soup as he gazes in amazement at the beef; on the left, three market women with crosses hanging from their necks admire a skate in a basket of fish; on the right, two ragged men carry a large pot of soup while another drinks from a bowl, and a Scottish soldier cowers beneath an archway; in the middle distance, to left, Hogarth himself is seen sketching at the moment when a soldier’s hand takes him by the shoulder; beyond, through the gate, is a religious procession.

 

  • Title: O’ the roast beef of old England &c. [graphic] / painted by W. Hogarth.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, No. 53 Fleet Street, [not before 1766]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 766.00.00.03+ Box 200

Acquired March 2020

The blessed effects of a united cabinet

description below

“George IV, seated on the throne, watches a display of jovial fraternization between John Bull and Pat, who dance, holding hands, each holding up a hat decorated respectively by rose and shamrock. A lanky garland of (thornless) roses and giant shamrocks drapes the crown on the back of the throne; one end is held up by Wellington (right), on the King’s left, the other by Peel on his right, so that the King is framed by it. J. B. is an obese and drink-blotched “cit”, with a snuff-box inscribed ‘Irish’ in his waistcoat pocket. Pat is a ragged Irish peasant, his bare legs swathed by twisted straw; his shillelagh lies on the ground; he looks with a broad but appraising grin at J. B., who sings: “Together reared together grown, Oh! let us now unite in one, Let friendship rivet the decree, Nor bigots sever Pat and Me!!!” Two discomfited ‘bigots’ depart on the left; one is a gouty parson using a crutch, with a ‘Petition against Concession’ hanging from his pocket, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15661, &c. The other is a Catholic bishop in robe and mitre. They say: ‘It’s time for us to be off.’ Above their heads flies a figure of Discord, her hair consisting of snakes which spit flame towards J. B. The King, with extended arm, says: ‘No more let Bigotry distract the Nation, Nor Priestcraft nurture lawless passion, Henceforth let rage and tumult cease, As brothers live and die in peace!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The blessed effects of a united cabinet, or, The glorious march of intellect [graphic] / T. Jones fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.17+

Acquired December 2020

Covetousness

description below

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by a cherub whose faces are turned away; the table is covered with coins. The prose text below is captioned “Covetousness” and consists of seven lines beginning: “Every step that a man makes beyond a moderate & reasonable Provision, is taking so much from the worthiness of his own spirit. …” This quote is taken from an popular 18th-century British courtesy book that appeared in many editions but was first published in 1715.: The Gentleman’s Library, containing rules for conduct in all parts of life. The scribe writes using Gothic lettering in pen and brown ink and decorates the perimeter of the the text and image with billowing flourishes. Printed above in a ribbon banner is a saying from Horace, “certum voto pete finem”–“set a definite limit to your desire.” On the verso written in pencil by a contemporary hand : Mind the noblest, he the law of Kings The noble mind distinguishes perfection It aids & strengthens virtue where it meets her ‘Tis not to be sported with.

  • Artist: Castle, William, active 1785, artist.
  • Title: Covetousness : manuscript / Wm. Castle.
  • Production: England, 1785.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss File 152+

Acquired June 2020

The itinerant chancellor

description belowA copy of the caricature of the British Statesman and High Lord Chancellor Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778-1868), that appeared in the center of an print that was published on 1 October 1834 in Every body’s album & caricature magazine, no. 19. He is depicted as a very thin traveller wearing a Scottish tam over his wig and using a broom as a walking stick; his shoe is worn through. He carries a wooden post labelled “Scratching post”, a box stamped “Containing the freedoms of all the Scotch towns” and a bag with the words “Broken victuals the leavings of the Edinburgh blow out”. Around his waist is another bag, “Oat meal”. Above the image framed in lines in gold ink: “I flatter myself I’ve made a tolerable good job by my “Starring it” with Old Grey in the North! Sold all my numbers of the Penny Magazine, and well puff’d it through every town I went. Made little less than one hundred speeches about, I forget now, Received some score of Burgesses, Freedoms, and Invitations to as many dinners, where I blew my own trumpet & obtained plenty of orders from our Usefull Knowledge Society! Now, woe to the unstamn’d when I get home! I must have a good scrub at my skin presently; I reckon I have got a taste of the fiddle through my itch for travelling!

  • Creator: M., M. S., artist.
  • Title: The itinerant chancellor [art original] / M.S.M. pinxt. March 39.
  • Production: [England], [March 1839]

Catalog Record

Drawings M999 no. 1 Box D205

Acquired December 2019

Simptoms of courage!

see description below

“British troops are about to march through a large fortified gate leading from open country (left) to the town of Buenos Ayres, where confused street-fighting is in progress. Can are fired from the battlements of the gate at the soldiers, some of whom lie dead or wounded. In the foreground an officer (mounted), in conversation with others, asks: “where is the General”; others say: “go look for the General”; “Find the General”; “why the General is lost”. A Highland officer, taking snuff (right), slyly; “I dare say he is varra safe.” From the country (left) three mounted men gallop, all saying, “I come for Orders”. In the background Whitelocke’s head and shoulders are seen peeping over a hillock on the extreme left. He says: “He that fights and runs away, May live to fight another day, But he thats in the Battle slain, Will never live to fight again”. In the distance, behind him, are tiny (British) soldiers in close formation. In the city men are firing and hurling stones from the roofs of flat-roofed houses on British soldiers in the plaza. On the wall (right) is a placard: ‘Lost, or Mis-led a General officer Who ever can [give] Information … ampl[y] rewarded.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Simptoms of courage! [graphic] / G. Whiteliver del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, March 26, 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.26.01+

Acquired June 2019