Here we go up up up and there he goes down down downe

description below

A satire of the 1832 Reform Bill, with a see-saw with the Crown as the fulcrum. At the center is William IV, waving the Union flag; to the right is Lord Grey, seated on the lever, helping William balance with a scroll marked ‘Union’, with John Bull standing underneath, wedging the lever up with the ‘Reform Bill’; and to the right the Duke of Wellington tumbles backwards as the lever breaks under the weight of him and two huge scrolls marked ‘Anti Reform’.

 

  • Title: Here we go up up up and there he goes down down downe [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by O. Hodgson, 10 Cloth Fair, [ca. 1831]

Catalog Record

831.00.00.50

Acquired November 2020

The female agent

description below

“Heading to etched verses. Mrs. Clarke, seated on a dais, receives applicants for commissions who advance through a doorway (left). She sits on a drum, wearing a cocked hat and military sash over a white dress, and holds up a sword. A short fat soldier holds over her head a Union flag with the white horse of Hanover. Two soldiers stand at attention with fixed bayonets behind her, and a fat trumpeter blows his trumpet. Another Union flag, without the white horse, flies from the corner of the large dais. On the wall hangs a notice: ‘Half-pay Commissions at Half Price for Ready Money’. The applicants press forward in a bunch, headed by a fat and gouty ‘cit’ hobbling on two sticks, behind whom is a chimneysweep. The first of three verses: ‘Come all you brave Fellows who wish for Promotion. Wether Captain or Colonel or a General’s your notion. A Warehouse I keep for the sale of Commissions, And our Prices you’ll find will suit all conditions, You’ll be treated with Honor if you secrecy mark Sir For my Master is Noble and I am his Clarke Sir, You’ll be treated &c.’ The last lines: ‘But forget not the ready (Gold or Notes) for pray mark! My Master wants Money, & so does his Clarke. But forget not &c.’ The verses are bordered by spears which serve as posts for plump purses, symmetrically attached to them.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The female agent [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. March 1809 by Walker, No. 7 Cornhill, [March 1809]

Catalog Record

809.03.00.05+

Acquired June 2020

Boroughmongers’ attack on the British column

lwlpr34661-807x1024

The opponents of parliamentary reform, including Wellington and Peel, attempt to pull down a column topped by Lord John Russell, a portrait of William IV on the plinth. The “Explanation of the engraving”: This spirited sketch was originally designed by George Cruikshank. Esq., of Pentouville, London. The column in the centre is dedicated to the “King and Constitution,” on the base of which is a portrait of his present Majesty, William IV. On the top of the columnn [sic] stands Lord John Russell, holding in his hand the Mirror of Truth. On the left of the pillar the Duke of Wellington, Sir R. Peel, and others are attempting with cords, axes, &c. to overturn the column; while on on [sic] the right, Lord Chancellor Brougham and Earl Grey stand in a calm and dignfied position, smiling at the futile attempts of the Boroughmongers to overturn the People’s Rights. On the same side Lord Althorp is seen bearing a banner, representing the future prosperity of England, and the Attorney General (Sir Thomas Denman) is supporting the Flag of Victory.

  • TitleBoroughmongers’ attack on the British column [graphic].
  • Publication[Birmingham, England : Printed by R. Heppel, 113 Coleshill-Street, Birmingham …, ca. 1830]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

830.00.00.159++

Acquired July 2016