John Broughton, prize fighter

description below

“Copy of a man with shaven head (James Figg) in casual dress, holding quarter-staff in his right hand and round-brimmed hat in the left, standing whole length to front in a landscape, with head tilted to right, glancing towards the viewer, smiling with lips parted; after a painting by Hogarth in a private collection.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Ross, F., active 1828-1849, printmaker.
  • Title: John Broughton, prize fighter [graphic] : from the original picture (of the same size) by William Hogarth, in the collection of Henry Ralph Willett, Esqre. of Merly House, in the County of Dorset / W. Hogarth ; F. Ross.
  • Publication: London : Published for the proprietor March 25th, 1842, by W. & G. Smith, 24 Lisle Street, Leicester Square, [25 March 1842]
  • Manufacture: [London] : C. Graf, lith. to Her Majesty

Catalog Record

842.00.00.07+

Acquired December 2021

A picture of futurity

description below

Grey stands in the center pulling back a curtain on the large painting (right) addressing the three men (probably Peel, Cumberland, and Wellington) who look on in amazement. Grey says, “Gentlemen this is a fine color’d picture representing Futurity. The idea of which was concieved [sic] by an injured people and painted by a new and promising artist. Reform.” Reading from the left Peel looks at himself in the painting seated in a chair at a loom, “Why if there a’nt me at a spinning Jenny.” Cumberland, hat flying off, looking at himself depicted in the painting on his backside, “And me dying on a dunghill.” And Wellington closest to the painting that depicts him as a wounded soldier holding a broom and begging with his cap in hand, observes “And me begging.” In the painting is a tower with the British and French flags the former with the year 1814, referencing the Wellington’s successful campaign to end the Peninsular War.

  • Printmaker: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: A picture of futurity [graphic] / C.J. Grant, d. & sc.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by G. Tregear, Cheapside, May 1831.

Catalog Record

831.05.00.02+

Acquired March 2022

Symmetry

description below

Two men stand on the sidewalk under a street lamp, one of whom is a dustman with a pipe sticking out of his cap who asks the other, a large tradesman in an apron about his emaciated, muzzled dog. The dialogue below the title reads: I say Joe, what makes you Muzzle Brutus? Vy he’s such a beggar for grub, he’d spile his shape in 5 minnits if it was off, and he only got sight of a butcher’s shop

  • Title: Symmetry [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Tregear, 123 Cheapside, London, [not after 1833]

Catalog Record

833.00.00.17+

Acquired February 2022

Bowl’d out

description below

“A cricket-match. The King (left), who is nearest the picture-plane and larger in scale than the others, has just bowled, with arms flung wide, a huge ball inscribed ‘Reform’, hitting the batsman, Wellington, in the stomach and knocking him against the stumps. Grey fields near the King, exclaiming, ‘Hu.a he’s Out’; the King: ‘Aye and with a Ground hopper too’. Farther off (left to right) are Burdett (in top-boots), Lord John Russell, who says ‘Thats what I call a Purger’ [see British Museum Satires No. 16602], and Brougham. All the players wear shirts and waistcoats. There are also two others in the field (as spectators they wear coats), Aberdeen (indicated by tartan) who says ‘Foul Foul’, and Cumberland. In the background are many frantically cheering spectators and a marquee from which flies a flag inscribed ‘Umpire Public Opinion’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker.
  • Title: Bowl’d out, or, The K-g & all England against the Boroughmongers [graphic] / C.J. Grant.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by Tregear, Cheapside, April 25th, 1831.

Catalog Record

831.04.25.01+

Acquired March 2022

Die Entdeckung

description below

A German copy of Hogarth’s “The Discovery” (1743?): a scene in a bedoom where four gentlemen stand beside a curtained bed in which a black woman reclines; she reaches out to touch the chin of one of the men who has evidently just pulled back the curtain. The scene is thought to record a practical joke carried out on the lothario John Highmore by his friends: having arranged an assignation with an attractive young woman, they replaced her with a black prostitute. When he discovered the swap, on climbing into bed, they appeared from hiding. See Paulson.

  • Printmaker: Heintz, C. F., printmaker.
  • Title: Die Entdeckung [graphic] / lith. v. C. F. Heintz.
  • Publication: [Germany?] : [publisher not identified], [between 1833 and 1836]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 830.00.00.01 Box 140

Acquired January 2021

The old bachelor’s thermometer

description below

The image at top shows an old man sitting in an armchair on the right, his gouty foot resting on a footstool, a crutch seen leaning against a stool beside him. He looks up at a younger woman on the left, who wears a bonnet and apron and is looking down and away from him. Draperies and a framed picture of Cupid shooting an arrow decorate the wall behind them. The text below, in two columns with an age listed at the beginning of each line, tells the humorous tale of the consequences of a man putting off marriage for prideful reasons from age “16 – incipient palpitations towards the young ladies”, through the ages of “29 – rails against the fair sex”, “37 – indulge in every kind of dissipation”, and “48 – thinks living alone quite irksome …”. Eventually, he resolves to have a prudent young woman as housekeeper and companion, gradually feeling some attachment to her and becoming completely under her influence. At age 60, as he begins to feel ill, and “grows rapidly worse, has his will made in her favour, and makes an exit.”

  • Title: The old bachelor’s thermometer. The old maid’s thermometer [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by S. and J. Fuller, 34, Rathbone-Place, [between 1809 and 1839]
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by L. Harrison, 373, Strand.

Catalog Record

809.00.00.64

Acquired March 2020

Memoirs of Theodore Lane

description below

A bound album with “Biographical sketch of the life of Mr. Theodore Lane” (pages [33]-59 from Pierce Egan’s 1831 publication: The show folks! (London : Printed for M. Arnold, 1831)), extra-illustrated with portraits of actors, actors in performances, playwrights, and art patrons, followed by cropped impressions, mounted, of the twenty-seven hand-colored plates that accompanied with Pierce Egan’s 1825 The life of an actor and on the final four leaves the nine small, black and white vignettes, also of theatrical scenes also from Egan’s Life of an actor. Lane was an English painter and engraver, who excelled at comic illustration. Also bound in at the front is an autograph letter from Egan dated 15 June 1832 to Mr. Elliott.

 

  • Author: Egan, Pierce, 1772-1849.
  • Title: Memoirs of Theodore Lane : printed text and manuscript / by Pierce Egan.
  • Production: England, circa 1825?

Catalog Record

Quarto 56 Eg13 832m

Acquired June 2020

A hint to duellists

description below

“A court scene. The judge, Bayley (right), addresses the apprehensive prisoner at the bar, Wellington (left): ‘”If a party, wilfully & intentionally does an act likely in its results to produce death, & death actually ensues, the act so done by him is done with what the Law calls “malice afore thought” & the party is guilty of murder!”‘ The jury, in a raised box, Counsel seated in the well of the court, and a shorthand-writer standing on the extreme left, stare at judge or prisoner. The heads of spectators fill the space under the jury-box.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Doyle, John, 1797-1868, printmaker.
  • Title: A hint to duellists [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by Thomas McLean, 26 Haymarket, April 13th, 1830.

Catalog Record

830.04.13.01+

Acquired June 2020

A broad hint

description below

Lyndhurst in Chancellor’s wig and gown, stands between Wellington (left, standing beside a writing table) and Brougham (right, also in a wig and gown), who face each other in profile. Lyndhurst looks at Wellington while gesturing with his left arm at Brougham who steps toward him. In a speech balloon, Lyndhurst says: My honourable & learned Friend wishes to Enroll himself amoung Your Graces political friends.

 

  • Printmaker: Doyle, John, 1797-1868, printmaker.
  • Title: A broad hint [graphic] / HB.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by S. Gans, 15 Southampton St., Strand, [ca. July 1829]
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by C. Ingrey, 310 Strand

Catalog Record

829.07.00.04+

Acquired June 2020

Riding apparatus for timid horsemen

description below

An older gentleman is on horseback strapped into a contraption that limits the horses movement (as such, it won’t move above a trot pace), limits any jolting movements and also provides shade and cover through the attachment of an umbrella. In the left background, a horseman struggles to control his horse as a panicked lady watches on and his top hat flies off behind him. To the right a male onlooker peers through his monocle in awe of the timid horsemen’s contraption.

 

  • Title: Riding apparatus for timid horsemen [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.09+

Acquired November 2020