Two heads better than one

Two heads better than one

“A pretty and elegant young woman kneels on a bed supporting her elbows on the pillow. A woman stands beside her raising the girl’s skirt in order to birch her, but finds her posterior covered by a life-sized mask which is a close portrait of herself. She says: “Oh ma foi! dot is mine own Head in t’oder place.””–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Two heads better than one, or, The governess outwitted [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Jany. 1817 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [January 1817]

Catalog Record

817.01.00.03+

Acquired April 2019

The Princes disastar

The Princes disastar. Detailed description below

“The Prince of Wales falls from an overturning phaeton or curricle. He is about to fall on the prostrate body of Mrs. Fitzherbert (left), who lies on her back, her breasts exposed, in an attitude intended to be indecorous. She lies under a steep bank or rock beside a country road. The horse rears behind the Prince.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title: The Princes disastar [sic], or, A fall in Fitz [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by James Aitken, Little Russell Court, Drury Lane, [July 1788]

Catalog Record 

788.07.00.08+

Acquired April 2019

The matter reversed

The Duchess of Devonshire sits astride a galloping fox

“The Duchess of Devonshire sits astride a galloping fox, her face to its tail. A signpost by the fox’s head points (left) ‘To Cuckolds Hall’; on the top of the post is a pair of horns. The Duchess wears a hat trimmed with ostrich feathers and with a ribbon inscribed ‘Fox'”– British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The matter reversed, or, One good turn deserves another [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. May 24, 1787, by J. Notice, Oxford Road, [24 May 1787]

Catalog Record 

787.05.24.02+

Acquired October 2018

The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all

The man wots got the whip hand of 'em all. Detailed description below

“A hand printing-press of metal (a Stanhope Press), supported on the stout legs of a man in breeches which seem to belong to a John Bull, puts to flight mere pigmy humans: two flee to the right, one propelled by a kick from a huge buckled shoe; two others have fallen. Two levers or handles serve as arms; one has a hand which grasps a giant pen, the feather entwined with three serpents which spit flame at the departing legs and cocked hat of Wellington, who, kicked into the air, disappears behind the upper right margin of the design. Another pair of legs, with the black stockings and buckled shoes of Eldon, project from the upper left margin; beside them a single leg and a broom indicate the departing Brougham. A second lever supports a print, ‘The Man Wot Drives The Sovereign’, copied from British Museum satires no. 15731; a flame issues from the press, threatening to scorch or destroy the print. The press is topped by a cap of Liberty inscribed ‘Free Press’ and encircled with a wreath. A little demon (a printer’s devil) rushes towards the press from the left, holding up a big ink-ball.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. May 30th, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [30 May 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.05.30.01+

Acquired October 2018

Preliminaries of peace, or, Politicians puzzled

Preliminaries of peace, or, Politicians puzzled

“Members of the Opposition in a row, talk in couples, except for the arch-egotist Erskine (see British Museum satires no. 9246) on the extreme left, who exclaims: “Peace – and I not consulted ’tis very strange, by Gad”. Sheridan (left), seated in profile to the right, reads the ‘Gazzette Extraordina[ry] Peace! Peace!’ with an expression of dismay. He says: “It is here, sure enough, I can scarcely believe my eyes, then all my fine speeches respecting the continuance of the War is dish’d, its no farce.” Burdett stands with legs astride looking down at him; he says: “O it can’t be true depend upon it.” The centre pair, Fox and Bedford, face each other in profile. Fox says: “This is a curious kind of business. I heard of it at the Crown and Anchor.” Bedford, in top-boots, and a riding whip under his arm, answers: “I heard of it in Bedfordshire.” On the right little Lord Derby turns to Tierney, asking, “Pray who is this Peace Maker – this Mr A- Ad, Ad, what’s his name, I never can think of it dam my Wig” [he is almost bald, with a tiny pigtail]. Tierney, looking down morosely, his arms folded, answers: “I really cannot immediately recollect, but I know he is not one of us – however we can find it in the Red Book”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Roberts, Piercy, active 1791-1805, printmaker.
  • TitlePreliminaries of peace, or, Politicians puzzled [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etchd. by Roberts.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by P. Roberts, 28 Middle Row, Holborn, [ca. October 1801]

Catalog Record 

801.10.00.03+

Acquired June 2018