Spectators at a print-shop

description below

“Satire; an extravagantly dressed woman catches a fashionable man by the arm as she points with her fan at a mezzotint droll in a print-shop window; a small dog looks up at her; an old gentleman with a stick standing on the right, stares at the prints and is surprised by a man with a warrant for his arrest.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Smith, John Raphael, 1752-1812, printmaker.
  • Title: Spectators at a print-shop in St. Paul’s Church Yard [graphic].
  • Edition: [State with plate no.].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Carington Bowles, at his map & print warehouse, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London, published as the act directs […] [not before 25 June 1774]

Catalog Record

774.06.25.01

Acquired November 2021

The Pantheon macaroni

description below

“A group of three half length figures. Two ladies of meretricious appearance seated at a tea-table, a man with a large Macaroni club of hair is handing one of them a cup of tea. One holds a fan and looks coyly towards the man, the other leans over her shoulder.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The Pantheon macaroni [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, No. 53 Fleet Street, [ca. 1772]

Catalog Record

772.00.00.55

Acquired July 2021

Five, in the afternoon

description below

“A young dandy lounging on a sofa with a young woman, holding up a glass, while she lays one hand on his knee, holding a glass herself, her elbow on a round table beside a bottle of Madeira and a dish of peaches; a bed seen through the open door in the background to right.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title: Five, in the afternoon [graphic] / Dighton delt.
  • Publication: London : Published 18 June 1795 by Haines & Son, No. 19 Rolls Buildings, Fetter Lane, [18 June 1795]

Catalog Record

795.06.18.01+

Acquired January 2021

Riding apparatus for timid horsemen

description below

An older gentleman is on horseback strapped into a contraption that limits the horses movement (as such, it won’t move above a trot pace), limits any jolting movements and also provides shade and cover through the attachment of an umbrella. In the left background, a horseman struggles to control his horse as a panicked lady watches on and his top hat flies off behind him. To the right a male onlooker peers through his monocle in awe of the timid horsemen’s contraption.

 

  • Title: Riding apparatus for timid horsemen [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.09+

Acquired November 2020

Dancers at a ball

description below

An exoticly dressed man and wild hair dances with a woman in a large headdress and flowing gown as three figures look on

 

  • Artist: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, artist.
  • Title: [Dancers at a ball] [art original] / R. Cruikshank.
  • Production: [England], [not after 1856]

Catalog Record

Drawings C89 no. 1 Box D205

Acquired November 2020

Arrogance (or nonchalance) of the Tenth retorted

see description below

“Two designs side by side. BALL ROOM. A repetition of British Museum satires no. 14646 [2]. The M.C. has no wand, but holds an opera-hat; he says: ‘Will you accept of this Lady for a partner, Sir?’ The hussar, who lounges with hands in pockets and both legs over the back of a chair, answers: ‘Shew her off!–Trot her out!! let us see her foine legs’. A civilian standing behind the lady (left) laughs: ‘Ha! Ha! Ha! So this is one of the extra polite Dandies of the Tenth‘. Two fellow officers stand beside the first. One says: ‘No! Tenth don’t daunce!!’ [cf. British Museum satires no. 14643A]. The other inspects the lady through an eyeglass, saying, ‘Zounds, Dam-me!’ DRAWING ROOM. The lady of the ball-room stands beside another; both are young and pretty and in ball-dress. The officer (right) bows from the waist, pointing the left toe, left hand on hip and holding up an eye-glass. He is without pelisse and sword. The second lady, holding up a fan, says: ‘Sir this is the Lady you desired me to Trot up to you.’ The lady in question also bends from the waist, pointing a toe, inspecting the officer through an eye-glass. She holds a lighted candle, saying, ‘No–Wont do! Trot him out!!–Trot him out!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, printmaker.
  • Title: Arrogance (or nonchalance) of the Tenth retorted [graphic] / R. Cruikshank fecit.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1824 by J. Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, [April 1824]

Catalog Record 

824.04.00.02+

Acquired August 2019

 

Political billiards

Political billiards. Detailed description below

“European sovereigns (wearing crowns) and others, watch a game of billiards between the Tsar, the principal figure, and the Sultan.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Political billiards [graphic] / William Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Sep. 30, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [30 September 1829]

Catalog Record

820.09.30.01+

Acquired April 2019

The egg, or, The memoirs of Gregory Giddy, Esq.

The egg title page

Fictitious memoir.

  • Title: The egg, or, The memoirs of Gregory Giddy, Esq. : with the lucubrations of Messrs. Francis Flimsy, Frederic Florid, and Ben Bombast … Also the Memoirs of a Right Honourable Puppy, or, The Bon Ton display’d … / conceived by a Celebrated Hen, and laid before the public by a Famous Cock-feeder.
  • Published: London : Printed for S. Smith, in Pater-Noster-Row, and sold by all other booksellers in town and country, [1772]

Catalog Record 

53 Eg29 772

Acquired April 2019

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

group of people dancing

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others of the set: one man and two ladies on the left and one lady and two men on the right dance rigidly erect, and watch the central pair with hauteur; the men are dandies, the women slim and fashionable. The duchess has a swirling paradise-plume in her towering loops of hair, above tossing ringlets.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, May 1829.

Catalog Record 

829.05.00.08+

Acquired October 2018

A kiss at the congress

Louis XVIII, grotesquely obese (left), and the Tsar kiss, their lips touching

“Louis XVIII, grotesquely obese (left), and the Tsar kiss, their lips touching. Louis, whose head is much the larger, grasps the back of Alexander’s head; the Tsar bends from the waist to reach beyond the King’s paunch. Louis, with the gouty legs and old-fashioned gold-embroidered coat and waistcoat of English caricature, wears the order of the Saint Esprit. The Tsar, in uniform, has the high pinched waist and bulging breast of the dandy (cf. British Museum Satires No. 13029) with enormous cavalry boots to the thigh, huge epaulets, and a sash, but no sword. He says: “My Dear Legitimate Brother (tho I believe I call Boney the same) I am happy to serve you tho your cursed Country Men almost destroyed my country–” Louis answers: “Ma Chere [sic] Ami, I am so rejoiced at your Brotherly Kindness in putting off our payment & takeing off your Troops that I could Devour you.” The embrace is watched by two Frenchmen on the left, and on the right by the King of Prussia, the Emperor of Austria, and a young man (? Napoleon’s son). Frederick William wears dandified uniform like that of the Tsar but with long trousers; he supports a large sword hanging from a belt, and holds a huge cocked hat; he watches the embrace with distaste, saying, “I am obliged to follow the Leaders at Present.” Francis I says: “I must agree for the moment but I have a Grandson.” One Frenchman wears uniform with top-boots; he says: “De Legitimate francais be too much for John Bull de manoeuvre by Gar ve want de Time & we show dem vat ve intend.” His companion, an elderly man wearing a court suit with a powdered wig (Richelieu attended the Conference on behalf of France) says delightedly: “Ah-ha he do him vid Compliments & den we do them out of the Money.” Behind them is a row of melancholy knock-kneed Grenadiers.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A kiss at the congress [graphic] : a legitimate embrace at Aix la Chapelle between Alexander the Great and Louis the Large, & others of the dramatis persona.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Nov. 18, 1818, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilli [sic] & 114 Oxford Street, [18 November 1818]

Catalog Record 

818.11.18.01+

Acquired October 2018