Portrait of a woman in a large hat

description below

A portrait of a woman in the rondel frame; in profile, head and shoulders only, looking down and to the right, wearing an extravagant hat; possibly a performer.

 

  • Printmaker: Laurie, Robert, 1755-1836, printmaker.
  • Title: [Portrait of a woman in a large hat] [graphic] / Robt. Dighton pinxit ; R. Laurie fecit.
  • Publication: London : Printed for R. Sayer & J. Bennett, No. 53 Fleet Street, 26 Feby. 1778, as the act directs.

Catalog Record

778.02.26.01

Acquired May 2020

Monastery of St. Trone

description below

A watercolor sketch of two rotund monks in front of a entrance to monastery in a lane within gate and wall surround. One attends closely to a young lady with two baskets on her arms; the other reads, lounging on a bench with his one foot raised.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: Monastery of St. Trone [art original].
  • Production: [England], [early 19th century]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no. 15 Box D145

Acquired July 2020

Mr. John Bull in a quandary

description below

An unfinished sketch for the engraving which appeared in the November 1845 issue of “George Cruikshank’s Table-book,” illustrating a brief article on railroad speculation by the periodical’s editor, Gilbert Abbott a Beckett. John Bull is beset by lilliputian tormentors who are removing all his cash, clothing, and possessions, beneath clouds of steam and a clanging bell.

 

  • Artist: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, artist.
  • Title: Mr. John Bull in a quandary, or, The anticipated effects of the railway calls [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1845]

Catalog Record

Drawings C889 no. 8 Box D115

Acquired July 2020

Georgian playing cards

description below

A set of playing cards drawn by an unidentified artist, showing caricatured figures; each vignette incorporates the formation of hearts or diamonds into the scene. Some of the cards are numbered or annotated on the backs while others show drafts of other sketches. The set contains only the red suits and with cards numbered from one to ten in each, although some numbers are missing and there are multiples of other numbers. Illustrations are also duplicated while others appear not to have been finished. There are no cards with clubs and spades. A number of the cards center on Shakespearean themes, social history and street scenes (such as courtroom drama, musicians performing, a man in the stocks and, in a few, card playing itself). Some of the scenes depicted on these cards show the more ribald, drawing from Macbeth’s Weird Sisters, Twelfth Night, King John, and The Merry Wives of Windsor; several are annotated on the reverse with lines from the plays. Falstaff is featured on several cards. Many of the cards reflect the mores of the period and the contrast between ruling passions and rules of conduct. In one, two men cast judgment upon a pregnant woman. It is annotated on the reverse with a dialogue between a Constable and a Judge. In “Village School” a schoolteacher manages to simultaneously hold a book and pinch a child’s ear (nine of hearts). Other subjects include a game of chess (five of diamonds); drinking and smoking in a pub (seven of diamonds); and “Bunbury’s Country Club” in which the artist has kept elements from the print (published circa 1788) for the six of diamonds. On one card the artist depicts a game of whist (annotated on the reverse “Can you one?”) for the ten of diamonds.

 

  • Title: [Georgian playing cards] [art original].
  • Production: [England], ca. 1800-1820.

Catalog Record

Drawings Un58 G

Acquired February 2020

A man-trap

description below

“A fashionably-dressed young woman reclining to left on a garden bench, looking provocative; roses and a sign-post lettered ‘Spring Guns set here’ behind to right, and a tree behind to left.”–British Museum online

 

  • Title: A man-trap [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Carington Bowles, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London. Publish’d as the act directs, [between 1766 and 1789]

Catalog Record

766.00.00.69

Acquired May 2020

A view of St. Martin’s Court

description below

Watercolor drawing that provides a view from the back window of a house on the west side of St Martin’s Lane and shows the buildings running behind St Martin’s Lane. Identifiable on the right of the image is the building occupied by the bookseller John Noble, as Sandby has included his shop sign, a bust of Dryden, placed over his door and a trade sign advertising his circulating library. In the projecting bay-window to the right of the composition, a man can be seen at work.

 

  • Artist: Sandby, Thomas, 1723-1798, artist.
  • Title: [A view of St. Martin’s Court] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1765]

Catalog record

Drawings Sa51 no. 1 Box D150

Acquired July 2020

“Returning Justice lifts aloft her scale.”

description below

“An emblematical and composite scene, with a realistic background intended for Lake Como, with the Villa d’Este (right), decorated with dancing figures as in British Museum satires no. 14171. In the foreground the Queen, between Bergami and Wood, falls from the tilting summit of a breaking pillar, supported on insecure props. She falls to the left, with Bergami, whose arm is round her waist. Wood, who holds her left hand, falls to the right, weighed down by a block inscribed ‘Log’ chained to his ankle. A small figure of Justice holding scales descends through the air towards them. The pillar resolves itself into separate blocks on each of which is a letter: ‘M O B / I L I T Y’. A board resting on a ram’s head forms the tiny platform from which the trio are falling. The pillar rests on a slab inscribed ‘Adultery’. This is supported on the bewigged head of Brougham which is raised on three props: a massive broom, and two beams poised on a rectanglar cage in which sits a second and much smaller lawyer (Denman). The beams are respectively ‘Sham Addresses’ and ‘Hired Processions’ [see British Museum satires no. 14182]. These props are flanked by two ladders resting against the ‘Adultery’ slab, by which Bergami (see British Museum satires no. 14183) and Wood (see British Museum satires no. 13734) have reached the Queen. One (left) is inscribed ‘Brass’; from it dangle emblems of Bergami: a postilion’s boot, a whip, and a Maltese cross, see British Museum satires no. 13810. The other (right) is ‘Wood’; from it dangle a bottle, a pestle and mortar, and a porter’s knot. In the foreground (right) are thistles, emblem of ‘Thistle-Wood’, see British Museum satires no. 14146. On Lake Como sails (left) a one-masted vessel with a tent on its deck, the polacca, see British Museum satires no. 13818. Beyond its shores and on the extreme left are tiny buildings representing Jerusalem. A lake-side signpost, ‘To Jerusalem’, points in the same direction, and near it the Princess and Bergami ride side by side on asses (see British Museum satires no. 13918, &c.). On the right is a travelling-carriage, with two horses and a postilion; in it sit the same couple. On the door are the letters ‘C·B’. In the lake behind it the pair are seen bathing, two nude figures standing waist-deep, holding hands. Near them is an empty rowing-boat inscribed ‘Como’..”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: “Returning Justice lifts aloft her scale.” Pope [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., June 1st, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.06.01.07

Acquired March 2020

Carlo Khan dethron’d, or, Billy’s triumph

description belowOn the left, Charles Fox, dressed as an Oriental prince, lies on the ground having fallen off an elephant who has the face of Lord North; Fox’s dice and dice box are scattered on the pavement. In the speech bubble above his head: “Perdition, take thee for the chanse is thing.” To his right, William Pitt sits astride the elephant who stands at the entrance to the East India House, his face turned toward the viewer. Pitt offers in his left hand a “New India Bill” and holds three others under his arm and in his pocket: “Stamp […] act”, “Sup … lies”, and “Military Act …”. The building on the left has been extended to as far as Pitt’s back.

  • Title: Carlo Khan dethron’d, or, Billy’s triumph [graphic].
  • Edition: [State with elephant’s face turned towards viewer].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d as the act directs March 24th, 1784, by S. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, [24 March 1784]

Catalog Record

784.03.24.01.1

Acquired December 2019

Stock jobbers, or, Gazette extraordinary

description belowA crowd of rotund stock brokers sit and stand around a table and against a wall with a clock. The broker centered in the front reads from a copy of the Gazette Extraordinary while some of the others peer over his shoulders looking for news, many where glasses and one uses a glass to read the print on the page. To his left at the table is a broker holding bank stock in his right hand, and another broker knocking over a bottle of Madeira at the table.

  • Title: Stock jobbers, or, Gazette extraordinary [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published 29 April 1795 by Haines & Son, No. 19, Rolls Buildings, Fetter Lane, [29 April 1795]

Catalog Record 

795.04.29.01+

Acquired December 2019

Promis’d horrors of the French invasion

description below“French troops march with fixed bayonets up St. James’s Street, the houses receding in perspective to the gate of the Palace, which is blazing. In the foreground on the left and right are ‘White’s’ and ‘Brookes’s’. The former is being raided by French troops; the Opposition is in triumphant possession of the latter. “–British Museum online catalogue

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: Promis’d horrors of the French invasion, or, Forcible reasons for negociating a regicide peace [graphic] : vide, the authority of Edmund Burke / Js. Gy. d. & fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Octr. 20th, 1796, by H. Humphrey, New Bond Street, [20 October 1796]

Catalog Record 

796.10.20.01++ Impression 2

Acquired November 2019