Out of court

description below

“Lady Conyngham chases Eldon from the royal precincts; she threatens him with the sceptre and a clenched fist, saying, Je le veut [sic]. She is décolletée, much bejewelled, and displays an elephantine leg and tiny foot. Close behind her stands Knighton, a pen behind his ear, his arm raised; he has just flung a massive gold inkpot decorated with the Royal Arms; ink falls on Eldon’s head. He says: take that, & that, & that, le Roy le veut. ‘Roy’ is scored through. Canning stands behind impassively, hand on hip, holding up a cross, and saying In hoc Signo vinces [Constantine’s miraculous vision: cf. British Museum Satires No. 15385]. The building behind is ornate and Gothic, more elaborate than the actual Cottage. The King’s head (out of scale with the building) is framed in a small casement window; with an equivocal expression he looks towards Eldon, saying, Necessitas non habet leges. Eldon has dropped the Mace and the Purse of the Great Seal; he says: Had I served my God with half the Zeal I have served my King, he would not have suffered me to be turned out for supporting his Cause.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, printmaker.
  • Title: Out of court [graphic] : auspicium melioris devi / H.H. fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. April 21, 1827, by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, [21 April 1827]

Catalog Record

827.04.21.01

Acquired July 2021

Reynard caught at last

description below

In an outdoor setting, Lord North and Edmund Burke look down at Charles Fox who stands knee-deep in a hole in the ground. All are in mourning clothes. Fox expresses fear of remaining in “this terrible Pitt” forever. An angry North, stamping his foot, expresses disillusionment in their coalition, while a quiet Burke decides to disassociate himself from Fox.

  • Title: Reynard caught at last, or, The [fox running away with a goose in its mouth] in a pitt [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d by E. Hedges, No. 92 Cornhill, March 19th 1784.

Catalog Record

784.03.19.01 Impression 3

Acquired July 2021

The Pantheon macaroni

description below

“A group of three half length figures. Two ladies of meretricious appearance seated at a tea-table, a man with a large Macaroni club of hair is handing one of them a cup of tea. One holds a fan and looks coyly towards the man, the other leans over her shoulder.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The Pantheon macaroni [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, No. 53 Fleet Street, [ca. 1772]

Catalog Record

772.00.00.55

Acquired July 2021

The Norfolk method of improving the breed

description below

“Thomas Coke of Norfolk leads his bride through a pastoral landscape; he prances gaily along hat in hand, turning to look at her, and singing, Oh the Days when I was Young; in his left hand is a book: Coke upon Littleton [see British Museum Satires No. 14423]. She takes his left arm, holding back the gauze veil that floats from a bonnet trimmed with flowers and towering feathers. Her tight-waisted pelisse has a deep crimson border. She is gravely demure, but sings: Of all the Gay Lads that Dance on the Green, Old Tommys the Lad for Me. He looks younger than 67, she older than 18. Behind them (right) is a country church, before them a signpost pointing To the Breeding Park and To the Nursery. An old ram branded C approaches a sheep; a French greyhound prances towards a decrepit and shaggy dog.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The Norfolk method of improving the breed [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 26th, 1822, by S.W. Fores, 41 Picadilly [sic], [26 March 1822]

Catalog Record

822.03.26.01+

Acquired May 2021

The slough of despond

description below

“Wardle, in back view in civilian dress, walks off with Mrs. Clarke seated on his right shoulder; a paper, ‘C. Wardle’, projects from his pocket. She looks back to point derisively down at the Duke of York who is falling into a watery swamp. She says: “There goes his —— Honor!!” He shakes his fist at the couple. Beside him are his cocked hat and a broken sword inscribed ‘from Holland’. Wardle walks uphill towards the temple of ‘Truth’; a (naked) figure holds out draperies. In the swamp is a board: ‘A Caution’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The slough of despond [graphic] / etchd. by I Spy I.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [ca. March 1809]

Catalog Record

809.03.00.06+

Acquired May 2021

 

Contrasted opinions respecting the new emperor

description below

“Two tiers of single English figures expressing appropriate opinions about the coronation of Napoleon.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Contrasted opinions respecting the new emperor [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. July 16th, 1804, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [16 July 1804]

Catalog Record

804.07.16.03+

Acquired November 2020

Putting his foot in it

description below

“A Portuguese soldier and a British soldier, facing each other, co-operatively seize Ferdinand VII, who is putting his left foot across a line dividing Spain (right) from Portugal. Each holds a musket without bayonet. The Englishman’s right hand is on Ferdinand’s shoulder; the Portuguese clutches one of the King’s ass’s ears. Ferdinand wears a crown, a long cloak, and a spiky ruff. A French officer on the extreme right makes off to the right, shocked and alarmed; he looks over his shoulder, exclaiming, Sacré dieu! le pauvre bete est attrappée.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Putting his foot in it [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, 1826.

Catalog Record

826.00.00.90+

Acquired May 2021

An eclipse

description below

“The irradiated head of George IV in profile to the left, is almost covered by the darkly shaded head of Wellington, which is almost full-face, but glaring to the right with fierce yet apprehensive melancholy. From this darkened mask slants down and to the right a broadening shadow which passes across a terrestrial globe at the base of the design, covering an island inscribed ‘England’, but leaving ‘Ireland’ (right) unobscured. The rays from the King’s head, only a few of which are covered by the shadow, extend to the margins and illuminate the edge of a border of dark cloud.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Phillips, John, active 1825-1831, printmaker.
  • Title: An eclipse [graphic] : lately discoverd in the Georgium Sidus, and quite unexpected by any of the astronomers / A. Sharpshooter fec.
  • Publication: London : Pub. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, 1829.

Catalog Record

829.06.00.02+

Acquired November 2020

A comfortable thing to be king of Greece

description below

“Prince Leopold sits enthroned, flanked by his new subjects; he wears uniform with a crown, and sits on a two-tiered circular dais in a chair of state, the seat of which is covered with giant thorns. Punctured and frightened, he grasps the arms of his chair with crisped fingers; his toes are drawn back, touching the ground, and he looks towards a savage-looking Greek (right) who kneels before him with a long knife held behind his back. A similar ruffian kneels on the left; others approach menacingly from the left, one smoking a long pipe and grasping a knife. They wear Greek costume with embroidered jackets and full white breeches. On the right are long-robed ecclesiastics, headed by a bearded patriarch with a cross in one hand, a knife in the other.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A comfortable thing to be king of Greece [graphic] / W. Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 6, 1830 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [6 March 1830]

Catalog Record

830.03.06.01+

Acquired November 2020

The head ranger and his fallow deer

description below

“George IV, dressed as a sportsman, in a broad-brimmed hat, jacket with many pockets, and gaiters above the knee, walks in Windsor Park beside a deer with a woman’s head and wearing a collar inscribed ‘Chester’. He puts his arm round her neck, and says, staring at her amorously, ‘”I’ll build you my Dear [altered to] deer a neat Cottage close by, | Where We can retreat unobserved, on the sly, | So be not afraid of the old Cunning Doe, | Whose stale selfish Tricks are become quite So-so.’ They are under a tree; bushes screen them from the Cottage (left), just below Windsor Castle on its steep hill.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The head ranger and his fallow deer [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [1829]

Catalog Record

829.00.00.114+

Acquired November 2020