Pure loyalty

description below

A man stands beside a public water pump holding the ladle that is chained to the pump. Looking straight at the viewer, he toasts the King with water from the ladle. Below the image are the words “Pure loyalty. Here’s a health to the King God bless him.”

  • Title: Pure loyalty [graphic] : here’s a health to the King God bless him / J.W.G.
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Tregear, 123 Cheapside, London, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Dean & Munday’s Lithoy., Threadneedle St.

Catalog Record

830.00.00.168

Acquired August 2023

All among the Hottentots – capering a shore

description below

King William IV dressed as a sailor dances in the centre of a semicircle of ministers who have black bodies and are partially draped. Among the ministers are Peel and Scarlett on the left, Lyndhurst and Wellington on the right both of whom wear nose-rings. Scarlett encircles Ellenborough, who, with Sugden, is behind the King. Their tribal dance celebration alludes to the relief that the ministers must have felt to be able to retain their positions with the new reign. William IV was a popular King and a stark contrast to George IV and was liable to wild bursts of passion as is suggested here. He and the Duke of Wellington (then prime minister) got on very well, hence the retainment of his ministers. He is dressed in sailor garb in reference to his years in the navy. The tribal dress of the ministers refers to the far-flung shores that William visited.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: All among the Hottentots – capering a shore [graphic] / W. Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. July 19, 1830, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [19 July 1830]

Catalog Record

830.07.19.01+

Acquired May 2023

Gazette Extraordinary! A glorious action!

printed text

A satire, using a naval metaphor, on the trial of Queen Caroline. ‘Dispatches have this day received, announcing a glorious and desperate action, which was fought off St. Stephen’s Bay, in which the vessels engaged were the Carolina, Captain Wood, the other parts of the division were brought into action by Lieutenant Browham and Dingman. The Caslteair, a 74, was commanded by the gallant Loverpool, Elden, and Sid. …’

  • Title: Gazette Extraordinary! A glorious action! Between the Carolina, a true blue frigate; and the Castleair, a first rate man of war.
  • Publication: [England] : [publisher not identified], [1820]

Catalog Record

File 53 C292 820Ga

Acquired July 2023

Political cartoons relating to reform in Great Britain and the United States

description below

A series of crude (and in some cases explicitly racist) lithographed cards numbered 1-16, with scenes relating to political reform on both sides of the Atlantic. On British side, they cover the reforms to the franchise made by the 1832 Reform Act, poking fun at ‘poor distress’d turn’d out Boroughmongers’ (No. 1), the rural squirearchy (No. 7), Taxes (No. 9), the established Church (No. 10) and Irishmen (no. 12), among others. United States political issues are shown in the second card which reuses – with added racist slurs – the design of Edward Williams Clay (1799-1857) entitled ‘Hurrah! hurrah for Genl. Jackson!!’ under the caption ‘Life in Philadelphia’. Cards nos. 4 and 7, with yet more overt racism, use references to American segregationism to caricature British political positions.

  • Title: [Political cartoons relating to reform in Great Britain and the United States] [graphic].
  • Publication: [York, England] : W.F. Wodson, lith., Pavement, York, [approximately 1832]

Catalog Record

724 832 P769

Acquired July 2023

A buz in a box, or, The poet in a pet

description below

“A corner of the stage at Drury Lane slants diagonally from left to right, showing part of the orchestra and pit (right) with part of two stage-boxes on the extreme right. The stage manager, Raymond, stands addressing the clamorous audience, while on the left a young man with ass’s ears sits on a donkey which flourishes its heels so that they strike the lowered stage-curtain. The donkey brays “Ih ho Ih ho Ih ho,” its hind-quarter is branded ‘My Pegasus Buz’. Its rider recites: “Nor ever here your smiles would be represt, “Knew you the rival flames that fires our breast, “Flame, Fire and Flame!–sad–woe Neddy! Ladies and Gentlemen, My Papa’s Pegasus is so full of fire and spirit that very few are capable of mounting him. for my self I never spoke but once & that was– Unce logos but if you will give me leave to get on with my Papas Monologue I am positive you will pronounce it the prettiest piece of poetry produced for the purpose.” Raymond says: “Ladies and Gentlemen, it was never the intention of the Proprietors to introduce Assess [sic] on these boards but as you seem entertained with their braying if it [is] your wish, we will procure some trainers from the other House as we are really ignorant in the management of thes [sic] Animals.” Greeted by derisive cheers from the audience, Dr. Busby, also with ass’s ears, leans from the upper stage-box, saying, “Ladies and Gentlemen, only hear My Son speak my Monologue written by myself the only one fit to be heard the committee are as ignorant of good Poetry a[s] I am of true criticism. I am a great writer reviews my sons works very clever indeed–writes my own life–well worth reading–my Life of Lucius Otrigger will astonish you now pray hear my Son speak my Monologue!–.” A man behind him shouts: “Bravo! Go on! Go, on,” and one in the crowded lower box applauds: “Bravo Apollo go on Go . . .” In the foreground a man in the pit shouts pointing to the ass: “Why don’t you come down and get up behind don’t you see he wants ballast.” Six others address the son: “When you have done there–set those Epigrams to Music young Apollo!”; “Off Off Off Off”; “he will be off presently if Neddy kicks so!”; “Go on Go on”; “Speak out you should have brought your Voice with you”; “hear him hear him.” The orchestra is empty of performers, but the music scores are headed ‘The Judgement of Midas’ [O’Keefe’s play]. Three large papers lie on the stage inscribed respectively: [1] ‘A Lord [Byron] and a Doctor once started for Fame Which for the best Poet should pass The Lord was cried up on account of his name The Doctor cried down for an Ass–‘ [2] ‘Doctor Buz he assures us on Drury new Stage No Horses or Elephants, there should engage But pray Doctor Buz, how comes it to pass, That you your own self should produce there an Ass’ [3] ‘Old Buz against Quadrupeds, war did wage, And swore on Drury’s board’s such Mum’ry ne’er should pass But forcing his own Pegasus on Drurys stage The Critic Audience christen’d Buz an Ass.’ Behind Raymond is the lower part of the verd-antique pillar which flanked the curtain, and on the right the large ornate lamp, of quasi-Egyptian design in which three hawk-headed monsters support an inverted tripod, the base of a ring of lamp-jets.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A buz in a box, or, The poet in a pet [graphic] : with a chip of the block, mounted on Papa’s Pegasus.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Octr. 21, 1812, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [21 October 1812]

Catalog Record

812.10.21.01+

Acquired July 2023

Do you want any brick-dust

description below

“A pretty young maidservant stands on a doorstep (right) while a man, Irish in appearance, gazes insinuatingly into her face as he fills her bowl with brick-dust from a jar. He has an ass which stands patiently, a double sack pannier-wise across his back and a second jar or measure standing on the sack. The profile of a shrewish old woman looks through the door at the couple, who are intent on each other. A dog barks at the girl. Behind is a street, the nearer houses tall the farther ones lower and gabled. At the doorway opposite a woman appears to be giving food to a poor woman and child. A man and woman lean from the attic windows of adjacent houses to converse. A little chimney-sweep emerges from a chimney, waving his brush.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Merke, Henri, printmaker.
  • Title: Do you want any brick-dust [graphic] / Rowlandson delin. ; Merke sculp.
  • Publication: London : Pub. Feb. 20, 1799, at R. Ackermann’s, 101 Strand, [20 February 1799]

Catalog Record

799.02.20.03+

Acquired April 2023

Human nature is fond of novelty

description below

An old officer in uniform with a wrinkled face and carbuncles looks lustfully at a pretty young woman as they walk together on a path, his hand grasping hers.

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: Human nature is fond of novelty – Pliny [art original].
  • Production: [England], [late 18th century?]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no. 24 Box D146

Acquired June 2023

Changing horses at Clermont

description below

A single-horse carriage is stopped in front of a rustic inn or roadhouse, with two caricatured Frenchmen (one a postillion wearing enormous boots) engaged in changing out the horse. An occupant of the carriage hands money out the window to a peasant woman holding an infant and accompanied by a young boy; two other shabbily dressed figures are nearby next to a tree, one of them playing a makeshift drum. In the doorway of the building stands a young woman, and to the left a man under an archway stands with arms crossed; both watch the scene unfold. In the background a postilion rides away on horseback, whip extended into the air.

  • Artist: Byron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, artist.
  • Title: [Changing horses at Clermont] [art original] / F.G. Byron.
  • Production: [France], [1790]

Catalog Record

Drawer Drawings B995 no. 1

Acquired June 2023

A free born Englishman!!!

description below

A man in ragged clothes stands facing right, hunched forward under the weight of a basket of ‘Rents’ and ‘Taxes’ strapped to his back. His legs are shackled, his mouth is closed by a padlock, and his hands are tied behind him. Image enclosed within a circle.

  • Printmaker: Spence, William, -1797, printmaker.
  • Title: free born Englishman!!! [graphic] : The glory of civilized life & the envy of Indian nations! / W. Spence 1796.
  • Publication: [London] : Publishd. by T. Spence, Turn Stile, Holborn, [1796]

Catalog Record

796.00.00.61

Acquired April 2023

The consequence of invasion, or, The hero’s reward

description below

“A very fat and jovial volunteer, dressed as a light horseman, holds ln his left hand a pole on which is the head of Napoleon in profile to the right. and wearing a huge cocked hat decorated with plumes, tricolour cockade, gold lace, and tassels. The hand that holds the pole holds also, by the hair, a bunch of bleeding heads which form a grisly garland round it. In his right hand is his sabre. He is surrounded by women; two embrace him, others hasten up; he swaggers with raised left leg, saying, “There you rouges, there! there’s the Boney Part – twenty more killed them!! twenty more killed them too!! I have destroyed half the Army with this same Toledo.” The women say, respectively: “Bless the Warrior that saved our Virgin charms”; “take care I’ll smother him with Kisses”; “Oh! what frightful Heads how ravishing they look, – they would have used us ill I am sure”; “ha ha, thats, that great man little Boney, how glum he looks.” An elderly spinster exclaims: “ah bless him he has saved us from Death and Vileation.” A handsome woman turns to a tall young man in civilian dress on the extreme left, saying, “There you Poltroon look how that noble Hero’s Caressed!” He turns away, saying, “Ods Niggins I wish I had been a Soldier too then the Girls would have run after me – but I never could bear the smell of Gun powder”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The consequence of invasion, or, The hero’s reward [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. August 1st, 1803, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [1 August 1803]

Catalog Record

803.08.01.01+

Acquired April 2023