The great general frightened by Don Key

description below

Wellington takes a flying stride from a braying ass (right) with tail erect and its feet firmly planted. His hair rises, his top-hat falls off, and he looks behind him to say: ‘Oh save me, save, Bob, run tell the King!’ The donkey (Key) brays ‘fe . fa . fum’. It wears a heavy chain and is draped by a furred livery gown marked with the City Arms.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, printmaker.
  • Title: The great general frightened by Don Key [graphic] / H. Heath fe.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 1830 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [November 1830]

Catalog Record

830.11.00.02+

Acquired March 2020

Truth, justice, and gratitude

description below

A satire on the legal case between two purveyor’s of medical ointments Felix Albinolo and Thomas Holloway in the form of a dialogue between Mr. Bull, Mr. Murphy, Mr. Sawney; with an image with a cartouche “Albinolo’s, or, The St. Come et St. Damien (brothers & physicians.) Ointment, 23 Earl Street, Blackfriars, London.” decorated with an eye (all-seeing?) at the top, snakes on the side, and a lion at the bottom.

 

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker.
  • Title: Truth, justice, and gratitude [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [B.D. Cousins], [31 August 1839]

Catalog Record

839.08.31.01

November 2020

A political reflection

description below

“George IV as the ‘Great Babe’ lies asleep in his cradle rocked by Lady Conyngham, while Wellington, seated before a pier-glass, places the crown on his own head. The glass reflects the dark emaciated features of British Museum Satires No. 15520. The Duke wears uniform with boots and sword. On a table below the glass the sceptre and orb lie on a cushion. Lady Conyngham, with a towering coiffure as in British Museum Satires No. 15508, croons: Oh slumber my darling | The time may soon come | When thy rest may be broken | By Trumpet & Drum [the last three words in large letters]. The infant sucks a thumb; a gouty foot projects from the coverlet. On the floor is a line of toys: a sailing boat on wheels, a model of Buckingham Palace reconstructed by Nash as in British Museum Satires No. 15668, a giraffe (see British Museum Satires No. 15425), a Life Guard on a toy horse, a Foot-Guard, a dismantled or unfinished ship resting on a prostrate toy soldier. A napkin on a towel-horse (right) indicates a nursery.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A political reflection [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. February 1828]

Catalog Record

828.02.00.05+

Acquired June 2020

Loose principles

description below

“Fox rises from a close-stool; Sheridan (left) is about to apply a syringe, inscribed ‘R——ts [Regent’s] Clyster’, to his rectum. Burke (right), wearing a Jesuit’s biretta (cf. British Museum Satires No. 6026), gropes in the close-stool, holding in his left hand its lid, inscribed ‘Not searching from Precedents but Consequences’ (a characteristic dictum); he says, “To Ordure – Ordure” (Burke was often called to order for his speeches on the Regency, cf. British Museum Satires No. 7499, &c). Fox says, “Exegi Monumentum cere perennias, or the finishing Stroke” (perhaps an allusion to the revolution Pillar, see British Museum Satires No. 7396). In his hand is a paper inscribed ‘Magna Charta Non Posteris sed Posterioribus’; his posterior is inscribed ‘Patriotic Bum’ and ‘Vox Populi’. He stands on a paper inscribed ‘Resolutions of P——l——t.’ Sheridan is ‘Principal Promoter of loose Principles’; under his right foot is an open book: ‘Congreve Plays School for Scandal’, probably implying plagiarism by Sheridan (cf. Moore, ‘Life of Sheridan’, p. 180, where resemblances between ‘The School for Scandal’ and ‘The Double Dealer’ are noted). The background is a library wall: a book-case containing folio volumes in some disorder is flanked by scowling busts of ‘Wat Tyler’ and ‘Jack Kade’. The books are inscribed: ‘The Laws of Pharaoh’ (Faro, cf. British Museum Satires No. 5972), ‘Political Prints’, ‘Life of Oliver Cromwell’ (cf. British Museum Satires No. 6380, &c), ‘Cataline’ (cf. British Museum Satires No. 6784), ‘Memoirs of Sam House’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker.
  • Title: Loose principles [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Jany. 21, 1789, by S. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, [21 January 1789]

Catalog Record

789.01.21.01+

Acquired May 2020

Le plan de campagne de 1806

description below

A French satire on the British administration, who are gathered around a table with bottles and glasses (two of which are toppled over) and a battle plan (’Plan de Berlin’) drawn on the tablecloth. In1806, French forces under Napoleon occupied Prussia, pursued the remnants of the shattered Prussian Army, and captured Berlin.

 

  • Title: Le plan de campagne de 1806, ou, Les deliberations des politiques anglais sur la guere [graphic].
  • Publication: A Paris : Chez Martinet, [1806]

Catalog Record

806.00.00.54+

Acquired May 2020

Concert of cats

description below

A group of cats look at book opened to a musical score, on the right and images of mice on the left. Some of the cats are singing while one plays a trumpet; one of the cats wears spectacles. In the foreground are a violin and loose sheets of music. The book is propped against a birdhouse from which emerges a mouse; a cloth has been draped over the birdhouse.

  • Title: [Concert of cats] [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [not before July 1817?]

Catalog Record

817.07.00.02

Acquired April 2020

A capital joke

description belowA group of gentlemen seated at an oval table, with glasses full of wine, laugh uproariously at a joke as they look down at the dog at the foot of the table.

 

  • Title: A capital joke [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sept. 1823 by J. Dickinson, 114 New Bond St., [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.02

Acquired June 2020

No effect

description below

A young gentlemen sits in a chair opposite three fashionable young ladies and their mother who are seated on a sofa. His wide grin suggests that he has amused himself with an anecdote, but the expressions on the ladies’ faces indcate that he has failed to amuse them. One of the young ladies looks down at the dog in her lap, another looks at her fan.

  • Title: No effect [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sepr. 1823 by J. Dickinson [illegible], [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.01

Acquired June 2020

A man-trap

description below

“A fashionably-dressed young woman reclining to left on a garden bench, looking provocative; roses and a sign-post lettered ‘Spring Guns set here’ behind to right, and a tree behind to left.”–British Museum online

 

  • Title: A man-trap [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Carington Bowles, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London. Publish’d as the act directs, [between 1766 and 1789]

Catalog Record

766.00.00.69

Acquired May 2020

“Returning Justice lifts aloft her scale.”

description below

“An emblematical and composite scene, with a realistic background intended for Lake Como, with the Villa d’Este (right), decorated with dancing figures as in British Museum satires no. 14171. In the foreground the Queen, between Bergami and Wood, falls from the tilting summit of a breaking pillar, supported on insecure props. She falls to the left, with Bergami, whose arm is round her waist. Wood, who holds her left hand, falls to the right, weighed down by a block inscribed ‘Log’ chained to his ankle. A small figure of Justice holding scales descends through the air towards them. The pillar resolves itself into separate blocks on each of which is a letter: ‘M O B / I L I T Y’. A board resting on a ram’s head forms the tiny platform from which the trio are falling. The pillar rests on a slab inscribed ‘Adultery’. This is supported on the bewigged head of Brougham which is raised on three props: a massive broom, and two beams poised on a rectanglar cage in which sits a second and much smaller lawyer (Denman). The beams are respectively ‘Sham Addresses’ and ‘Hired Processions’ [see British Museum satires no. 14182]. These props are flanked by two ladders resting against the ‘Adultery’ slab, by which Bergami (see British Museum satires no. 14183) and Wood (see British Museum satires no. 13734) have reached the Queen. One (left) is inscribed ‘Brass’; from it dangle emblems of Bergami: a postilion’s boot, a whip, and a Maltese cross, see British Museum satires no. 13810. The other (right) is ‘Wood’; from it dangle a bottle, a pestle and mortar, and a porter’s knot. In the foreground (right) are thistles, emblem of ‘Thistle-Wood’, see British Museum satires no. 14146. On Lake Como sails (left) a one-masted vessel with a tent on its deck, the polacca, see British Museum satires no. 13818. Beyond its shores and on the extreme left are tiny buildings representing Jerusalem. A lake-side signpost, ‘To Jerusalem’, points in the same direction, and near it the Princess and Bergami ride side by side on asses (see British Museum satires no. 13918, &c.). On the right is a travelling-carriage, with two horses and a postilion; in it sit the same couple. On the door are the letters ‘C·B’. In the lake behind it the pair are seen bathing, two nude figures standing waist-deep, holding hands. Near them is an empty rowing-boat inscribed ‘Como’..”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: “Returning Justice lifts aloft her scale.” Pope [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., June 1st, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.06.01.07

Acquired March 2020