A devil rolled in snow

description below

A grotesque racist caricature of a buxom black woman in a white dress decorated with flowers and a bonnet with ribbons, grinning at the viewer and saying ‘Don’t you think you Fancy me now Massa’. Probably inspired by the “High Life in Philadelphia” series by Edward Williams Clay between 1828 and 1830 mocking supposed racial differences and modeled after George and Robert Cruikshank’s Life in London.

  • Title: devil rolled in snow [graphic] / [image of a hand] fecit.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1830?]

Catalog Record

830.00.00.163

Acquired February 2022

High life at five in the morning

description below

Print shows an interior view of a room; a duke has arrived home drunk at 5 a.m. (as shown on the longcase clock beside the door) accompanied by two attendants and watchman only to find his bedchamber occupied by another man. Through the open curtains around the bed can be seen a bare-breasted duchess. On the floor near the bed is an open book, “Memoirs of a woman of pleasure” (a reference to John Cleland’s Fanny Hill …) beside the chamber pot. As the duke with sword drawn, staggers forward, his rival climbs through a window in the background, leaving his clothes behind on a chair. A monkey dashes onto the table near the window on the heels of the husband’s rival but pulls down the tablecloth causing the items on the table to be strewn across the floor in the foreground; a book opened to pages “Chastity in the nobility a farce. Dedicated to their Graces the Duke & Dutchess xxx”, breaking a broken mirror, and sending the bottles and jars onto the floor. The bottles have labels “Viper drops” and “Surfeit water” and the jar is labeled “Lip salve”.

  • Title: High life at five in the morning [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, May 1st, 1769.

Catalog Record

769.05.01.01+

Acquired February 2022

Townsend the umpire of love

description below

“Townsend, the Bow Street Officer, holding up his constable’s staff, chases a man away from a country house, a corner of which appears on the right. A third man, Wellesley-Pole, shelters behind the constable, stretching out his arms towards his fleeing rival; he turns his head to listen to a pretty young woman who stands on a small iron balcony immediately behind him, with an open sash-window behind her. She says: “Risk not thy Precious life my Love in bold encounter with that dareing Scott.” He answers: “no no my dear I’ll shelter me behind the arm of Justice, & hunt him from his Scent by one of the most famous Bull Dogs in the Kingdom, & teach him never never to Dare to woo the [sic] from my Longing Arms Oh thou Golden Angel.” A paper inscribed ‘Scot’ projects from the fugitive’s pocket. Townsend says: “I’ll teach you worsted working rascall to dare to set up in opposition to the Irish Secretary D-n your Impudence.” A signpost points (left) to ‘Norwhich’ and (right) ‘To Chippenham’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Townsend the umpire of love, or, The Poled Scott hunted off after a long struggle [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Jan. 7, 1812, by S.W. Fores, 50 Picadilli [sic], [7 January 1812]

Catalog Record

812.01.07.01

Acquired February 2022

The progress of the Empress Josephine

description below

“A sequence of eight libellous representations arranged in two rows, each with a caption. (1) She is stout, homely, and rather truculent as ‘A Planters Daughter.’ (2) As a clumsy and bejewelled parvenue she is ‘A French Countess’. (3) In weeds she holds a handkerchief to one eye: ‘A Widow.’ (4) Elegantly dressed, she holds out heavily shackled wrists: ‘A Prisoner’. (5) Similarly dressed, she raises a forefinger and holds a fan before one eye: ‘A Loose Fish.’ (6) She dances, Maenad-like, snapping thumb and forefinger, as ‘Barras’s Mistress’ [see British Museum Satires No. 10369]. (7) She wears a military tunic and plumed helmet, and holds a riding-switch as ‘A Generals Lady.’ (8) Walking in profile to the left. holding out a sceptre and wearing a jewelled gown and a crown, she is fat and vulgar as ‘An Empress’ [see British Museum Satires No. 10362].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The progress of the Empress Josephine [graphic] / Woodward delt. ; C.W. scult.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 20th, 1808, by Thos. Tegg, 111 Cheapside, [20 April 1808]

Catalog Record

808.04.20.01

Acquired August 2021

Les satyres de Guillaume Hogarth

title page

First edition after Hogarth’s death includes: “Marriage à la mode” (1745); “A Harlot’s Progress” (1731), “Gin Lane” and “Beer Lane” (1751) and “Before and After” (with titles in English and French).
“A Harlot’s Progress” printed with decorative frames on both sides.

  • Author: Hogarth, William, 1697-1764, printmaker.
  • Title: Les satyres de Guillaume Hogarth : oeuvre moral et comique en LXIX sujets.
  • Publication: A Londres : Chez Robert Sayer, marchand de cartes et d’estampes dans Fleet-Street, No. 53, MDCCLXVIII [1768]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 H67 768C

Acquired August 2020

Spectators at a print-shop

description below

“Satire; an extravagantly dressed woman catches a fashionable man by the arm as she points with her fan at a mezzotint droll in a print-shop window; a small dog looks up at her; an old gentleman with a stick standing on the right, stares at the prints and is surprised by a man with a warrant for his arrest.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Smith, John Raphael, 1752-1812, printmaker.
  • Title: Spectators at a print-shop in St. Paul’s Church Yard [graphic].
  • Edition: [State with plate no.].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Carington Bowles, at his map & print warehouse, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London, published as the act directs […] [not before 25 June 1774]

Catalog Record

774.06.25.01

Acquired November 2021

A representation of the present state of France

description below

“Napoleon, pushing an officer before him through a pillared doorway, looks back to speak to a monk and a sansculotte, shackled together, who drag a car in which is an imperial crown. They hold a large scroll inscribed: ‘Most religious Sovereign – the benefactor of the church – the patron of liberty – the scourge of tyrants, and the defender of our most holy religion; may you long fill the Imperial Chair, and diffuse over a free and happy people all the blessings of your auspicious government.’ Demons fly round a tricolour flag which floats from the car. Napoleon holds out a scroll headed: ‘Address, &c. &c. &c. The Legions of France congratu – ‘, saying, “This token of your gratitude, my dear subjects will ever stimulate me to protect your liberties – to promote your happiness – and to preserve my empire from the ravages of war, tyranny and oppression.” The officer, with a cynical smile, says: “Patron of Liberty – Defender of our most holy Religion – free and happy People – Ha! ha! ha! – What may we not expect? – Has he not got them under excellent subjection?” On the left is Napoleon’s ‘Secret Chamber’: a table is covered with maps and plans; a large map, partly unrolled, shows Europe from ‘[En]gland to [Tur]key’, including the ‘Black Sea’; another map shows ‘Suez’ and the ‘Red Sea’. A demon under the table holds up a large pile of papers: ‘Plans against England’; on the floor are similar piles: ‘Religion’ and ‘Treaties’. There are also ‘Plans against Germany and Turkey’, and a paper: ‘Mem. the chance of the conquest of England is worth the sacrifice of one third of the people of France. Item. As Charlemaine not only conquered Italy, but the whole of Germany, and left the Imperial dignity hereditary in the Sovereigns of France, it is indispensably necessary to obtain possession of Germany, in order to support the dignity of the Gallic empire.’ On the wall are three pictures: ‘Sacking of Rome’, ‘Dissolution of the National Assembly’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9426, &c], and ‘View of Cairo’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9358, &c.]. Below the design: ‘Explanation. The two figures bringing the Imperial crown . . . represent . . . the bitter Enemies of Aristocracy, and the staunch Supporters of the late Monarchial Government, tackled to the National Machine, and reduced to the most abject State of Slavery by the Influence of the Military, whose congratulatory Address Bonaparte has received at the Hand of an Officer, and is introducing him into his Secret Chamber to receive Instructions. The Demons hovering over the Imperial Crown denote Five Years of Destruction; during which Period Bonaparte will overrun and ravage the greater Part of the Continent of Europe, be the Means of nearly depopulating Turkey, and finally be slain with the Sword, be cast out as an abominable Branch, and be left as Dung to rot on the Face of the Earth.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: A representation of the present state of France [graphic].
  • Publication:[London] : Published by L. Mayer, as the act directs, August 13, 1804.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Bryer, printer, Bridge Street, Blackfriars

Catalog Record

804.08.13.01+

Acquired May 2021

 

Ladder of matrimony

description below

A semi-comic gift card showing the eight stages of matrimony: Possession, Rumination, Alteration, Irritation, Disputation, Desperation, Detestation, and Separation. Each stage is described with four lines of verse and with vignette scenes of a husband and wife.

  • Title: [Ladder of matrimony] [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published by R. Miller, Lambeth, [1830s]

Catalog Record

File 66 830 L154

Acquired October 2021

A sharp bite

description below

Three gentleman sit in a row boat fishing. As the man on the right tumbles off his chair into the river as waves hit their small boat, he accidently hooks his companion in the nose. A third man (left) looks on in horror as the man in the middle cries out in pain. Their dog has also fallen in the river from where he looks on the scene.

  • Title: sharp bite [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [1824?]

Catalog Record

824.00.00.12 Impression 2

Acquired July 2020

A scene on the frontiers…

description below

A scene on the frontier of the United States: a Native American (left) is shown scalping a dead British soldier. Another British soldier who has already been scalped is shown on the left edge of the design. In the center a second Native American, from whose rifle hangs a sign “Reward for 16 … scalps” and in whose knife initials “G.R.” have been etched, is shown handing a scalp to an obese British soldier (right). The speech balloon above the soldier ‘s head reads: “Bring me the scalps and the King our master will reward you”; from his pocket a strip of paper “Secret service money”. In the background, Native Americans and British soldiers dance around a fire.

  • Printmaker: G. L. (Draughtsman of Port de Québec), printmaker.
  • Title: A scene on the frontiers as practiced by the humane British and their worthy allies! [graphic] / L.G.
  • Publication: [United States] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1813]

Catalog Record

813.00.00.25+

Acquired August 2021