Consultation of physicians

description below

A group portrait of various doctors and quacks, including Mrs Mapp, Dr. Joshua Ward and John Taylor. A version of the print also published with lettering “The company of undertakers”. The three named quacks occupy the top, twelve other ‘doctors’ are situated in the lower half; most of them have gold canes held up to their noses, one is dipping his finger into a urinal while another holds it.

 

  • Title: Consultation of physicians [graphic] / Wm. Hogarth invt.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Bowles & Carver, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London, [ca. 1817]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 817.00.00.24

Acquired January 2021

Long faces at Smithfield

description below

Discontent among British merchants and farmers who had enjoyed high prices for their domestic produce during the Revolutionary Wars.

 

  • Printmaker: Roberts, Piercy, active 1791-1805, printmaker.
  • Title: Long faces at Smithfield. Peace, long faces at the corn-exchange [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etchd. by Roberts.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by P. Roberts, 28 Middle-row, Holborn, [1802]

Catalog record

802.00.00.34+

Acquired September 2020

French volunteers marching to the conquest of Great Britain

description below

“A mounted officer with drawn sabre heads a procession of ‘Volunteers’ linked by a chain to his horse and to each other. The horse is a well-bred animal with handsome trappings, but the rider is lean and has torn breeches. He is followed by a file of three whose necks are attached to the horse and whose hands or arms are pinioned. All are miserable wretches, barelegged and ragged; the last, less abject, has sabots and takes snuff. He is chained to the neck of a donkey on whose back is a pannier containing three despairing conscripts. To the animal’s tail is tied a low truck on which a moribund shackled man lies on his back, his knees drawn up. To the truck is chained, in a stooping position, a man whose hands are tied behind his back, his nails being long talons. Birds, scenting carrion, fly towards the procession. Below the design: ‘Dedicated (by an Eye Witness) to the Volunteers of Great Britain’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: French volunteers marching to the conquest of Great Britain [graphic] / C.L.S.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Octr. 25th, 1803, by H. Humphrey, 27 St. Jamess [sic] Street, [25 October 1803]

Catalog Record

803.10.25.01++

Acquired March 2020

O’ the roast beef of old England…

description below

Engraving of William Hogarth’s 1748 painting ‘O the Roast Beef of Old England’ (London, Tate Britain), which he had himself published as a print. The scene is set at the Gate of Calais (after the painting in the Tate Gallery) with a fat monk prodding a large sirloin of beef carried by a cook, on either side are two French soldiers, one of whom spills his bowl of thin soup as he gazes in amazement at the beef; on the left, three market women with crosses hanging from their necks admire a skate in a basket of fish; on the right, two ragged men carry a large pot of soup while another drinks from a bowl, and a Scottish soldier cowers beneath an archway; in the middle distance, to left, Hogarth himself is seen sketching at the moment when a soldier’s hand takes him by the shoulder; beyond, through the gate, is a religious procession.

 

  • Title: O’ the roast beef of old England &c. [graphic] / painted by W. Hogarth.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, No. 53 Fleet Street, [not before 1766]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 766.00.00.03+ Box 200

Acquired March 2020

A hint to duellists

description below

“A court scene. The judge, Bayley (right), addresses the apprehensive prisoner at the bar, Wellington (left): ‘”If a party, wilfully & intentionally does an act likely in its results to produce death, & death actually ensues, the act so done by him is done with what the Law calls “malice afore thought” & the party is guilty of murder!”‘ The jury, in a raised box, Counsel seated in the well of the court, and a shorthand-writer standing on the extreme left, stare at judge or prisoner. The heads of spectators fill the space under the jury-box.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Doyle, John, 1797-1868, printmaker.
  • Title: A hint to duellists [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by Thomas McLean, 26 Haymarket, April 13th, 1830.

Catalog Record

830.04.13.01+

Acquired June 2020

A coronation stool, of repentance

description below

“The Queen sits in profile to the right on a huge crown, her left foot on a footstool. She partly hides her face and an ambiguous grimace behind a fan inscribed C; in her right hand is a handkerchief. She is fat, very décolletée, and bejewelled, with monstrous ostrich feathers in her hair.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: A coronation stool, of repentance [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James St., July 19, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.07.19.07

Acquired March 2020

A broad hint

description below

Lyndhurst in Chancellor’s wig and gown, stands between Wellington (left, standing beside a writing table) and Brougham (right, also in a wig and gown), who face each other in profile. Lyndhurst looks at Wellington while gesturing with his left arm at Brougham who steps toward him. In a speech balloon, Lyndhurst says: My honourable & learned Friend wishes to Enroll himself amoung Your Graces political friends.

 

  • Printmaker: Doyle, John, 1797-1868, printmaker.
  • Title: A broad hint [graphic] / HB.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by S. Gans, 15 Southampton St., Strand, [ca. July 1829]
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by C. Ingrey, 310 Strand

Catalog Record

829.07.00.04+

Acquired June 2020

The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford

description below

“A satire on the approaching election for the Chancellorship of Oxford University. Grenville, dressed as a cardinal, heads a small procession towards the Devil, who wears a robe on which is a large cross, and holds the bland mask with which he has been hiding his face. Grenville, bowing low, and deferentially holding his large hat, holds out a paper: Catholic Petition for the vacant Chancellorship with a Plan for Erecting a New Popish Sanhedrim on the ruins of old Alma-Mater, The Devil says: Well done my Children! This is all the Convocation I would have; in his left hand is a pitchfork. The Marquis of Buckingham, dressed as a Jesuit, stands behind him, one hand on his shoulder, the other holding his barbed tail. Beside him is Canning (unrecognizable) wearing a Jesuit’s biretta. Beside the Devil is a greyhound with the head of Grey, its collar inscribed Popish Gray Hound. Immediately behind Grenville walks the Pope, wearing his tiara, and holding his cross; he holds up Grenville’s robe on which is a large cross. Napoleon crouches behind the Pope, holding on to his robes and hiding under his mantle. He wears a crown, with uniform and spurred boots; his hand is on the hilt of his sword. Behind walk together Temple, enormously fat and dressed as a monk, and his brother, Lord George Grenville, similarly dressed. The former carries the Host, the latter a lighted candle. In the background rows of bishops and clergymen face the procession. Bishops in the front row, humbly sweeping the ground with their mitres, bow low, each clasping a Mass Book, while those behind cheer with raised mortar-board, hand, or Mass Book. On five of the books are the names of bishoprics: York [Vernon], St Asaph [Cleaver], London [Randolph], Oxford [Moss], Norwich [Bathurst]. Above the design (and the bishops): Golgotha, i.e: the place of Skulls.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford by the Cardinal Broad-bottom [graphic] / Js. Gillray fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Publishd. by H. Humphrey, 27 St. James Street, London, Decr. 1st, 1809.

Catalog Record 

809.12.01.04+

Acquired January 2020

A city taylor’s wife dressing for the Pantheon

description below

A fashionably dressed woman sitting behind a table is taking a necklace out of a box. She looks with disdain at her enraged husband in old-fashioned clothes and a nightcap, sitting next to her, his fists clenched and despair on his face. In his lap lies a pair of breeches he is sewing; above on the wall of their meagre abode hangs a small stag’s head with antlers.

  • Printmaker: Wilson, James, approximately 1735-approximately 1786, printmaker.
  • Title: A city taylor’s wife dressing for the Pantheon [graphic] / Martin pinxt. ; Wilson sculp.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d 5th Feby. 1772 by Heny. Parker at No. 82 in Cornhill, London, [5 February 1772]

Catalog Record

772.02.05.02.1+

January 2020