The cradle hymn

description below

“Heading to a broadside printed in two columns. The King, a bloated and whiskered infant, sleeps in a cradle, rocked by Sidmouth (right), a lean old woman wearing a cap and bag-wig, who sits in a rocking-chair, his clyster-pipe (cf. British Museum Satires No. 9849) on the ground. The cradle is surmounted by a pagoda with bells, and ornamented by two large crocodiles, representing the Chinese dragons of the Pavilion, cf. British Museum Satires No. 12749. On it are also a sun, with a fool’s cap in its disk, between crescent moons. Round the cradle lie toys: soldiers, mounted lancers, &c., on wheels, a cannon, a sceptre, a crown with a toy windmill stuck in it. With these are papers: ‘Divorce’; ‘Protocal’ [sic]; ‘Send her to Hell’. The infant holds a coral and bells and a corkscrew. Castlereagh sits over the fire warming a napkin. Canning (see British Museum Satires No. 13737) walks off to the left, disgustedly carrying the pan of a commode decorated with a crown and ‘G.R.’ On the chimneypiece are pap-boat, bottle of ‘Dolby’s Carminative, &c’. (Dolby was a radical bookseller, ‘Dalby’s carminative’ a well-known remedy for infants). A large ‘Green Bag’ hangs on the wall. In a doorway behind Sidmouth, inscribed ‘French Dolls’, stand two young women, in evening dress, stiff and impassive.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, printmaker.
  • Title: The cradle hymn [graphic] : new version / I.R. Cruikshank fecit.
  • Publication: [London] : Published by T. Dolby, 299, Strand, and 34, Wardour Street, Soho, [ca. July 1820]

Catalog Record

820.07.00.01

Acquired November 2021

A merry Christmas & a happy new year in London

description below

A pedestrian struggles through deep slushy snow, facing driving snow, with a broken umbrella, the spokes projecting through the cover. He clutches at his cloak and hat; he wears gaiters to the knee with socks over them, and overshoes. Cape and comforter stream behind him. In the background are two buildings. Other figures also struggling through the snow are faintly etched in the distance.

  • Title: merry Christmas & a happy new year in London [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [not before 1825]

Catalog Record

825.00.00.127

Acquired February 2022

Tight lacing

description below

An elderly lady with towering coiffure topped with feathers and ribbons holds tightly to the post of a canopy bed, as her equally old and ugly maid, bracing a foot on the lady’s cork rump, tightens her stays

  • Title: Tight lacing [graphic] / RS [monogram] ; J.H.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 5 Marh. 1777 by W. Humphrey, Gerrard Street, Soho …, [5 March 1777]

Catalog Record

777.03.05.01.1

Acquired July 2021

A picture of futurity

description below

Grey stands in the center pulling back a curtain on the large painting (right) addressing the three men (probably Peel, Cumberland, and Wellington) who look on in amazement. Grey says, “Gentlemen this is a fine color’d picture representing Futurity. The idea of which was concieved [sic] by an injured people and painted by a new and promising artist. Reform.” Reading from the left Peel looks at himself in the painting seated in a chair at a loom, “Why if there a’nt me at a spinning Jenny.” Cumberland, hat flying off, looking at himself depicted in the painting on his backside, “And me dying on a dunghill.” And Wellington closest to the painting that depicts him as a wounded soldier holding a broom and begging with his cap in hand, observes “And me begging.” In the painting is a tower with the British and French flags the former with the year 1814, referencing the Wellington’s successful campaign to end the Peninsular War.

  • Printmaker: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: A picture of futurity [graphic] / C.J. Grant, d. & sc.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by G. Tregear, Cheapside, May 1831.

Catalog Record

831.05.00.02+

Acquired March 2022

The extinguisher, or, Putting out the great law-luminary

description below

“Eldon’s head rests on a candle-end which is in an elaborate candle-stick of gold plate, standing on the ground. Wellington (left), in uniform, reaches up to cover it with a huge extinguisher inscribed ‘Catholic Bill Majority 168’; he says: ‘Thus I obscure you, ne’er to shine again.’ Eldon looks to the left, registering intensive melancholy; rays from his head, obstructed on the left by the extinguisher, strike against the profile of George IV, whose head, shoulder, and paunch project from the right margin, leaning towards the candle. The King says ‘Poor Old Bags!’ (Cf. British Museum Satires No. 12883.)”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The extinguisher, or, Putting out the great law-luminary [graphic] / T.J. fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Picadilly [sic], [April? 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.18+

Acquired January 2022

Symmetry

description below

Two men stand on the sidewalk under a street lamp, one of whom is a dustman with a pipe sticking out of his cap who asks the other, a large tradesman in an apron about his emaciated, muzzled dog. The dialogue below the title reads: I say Joe, what makes you Muzzle Brutus? Vy he’s such a beggar for grub, he’d spile his shape in 5 minnits if it was off, and he only got sight of a butcher’s shop

  • Title: Symmetry [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Tregear, 123 Cheapside, London, [not after 1833]

Catalog Record

833.00.00.17+

Acquired February 2022

The old times

description below

Outside a rustic building with a sign “Old Farmer […]ck House”, a farmer with a large belly, smoking a pipe, leans against a table loaded with bags with ‘500’ written on them. Above the table on the fence is a sign “Quarter Day”.

  • Printmaker: Lynch, James Henry, -1868, printmaker.
  • Title: The old times [graphic] / J.H. Lynch fct.
  • Publication: [London] : Published by J. Royle, 27, King Street, Holborn, London, [1826]

Catalog Record

826.00.00.91+

Acquired February 2022

An attempt to exhibit the leading events of the Queen’s life

description below

“Broadside; the text in five columns: small cuts I-X on the left and right, each with an eight-line verse below it; cuts XI and XII above and below the three centre columns. Cut I. The Queen’s arrival in England, and Marriage. The Prince leads her ashore from a small boat. Cut II. Taking farewell of Charlotte [1814]. Mother and daughter weep, turning from each other; the Princess approaches a ship’s boat, Cut III. Her Return–Landing at Dover [June 1820]. She is rowed to shore by two sailors. Cut IV. Her Trial in the House of Lords. A simplified but recognizable view. Cut V. Her Acquittal. She drives in an open carriage past Carlton House. Cut VI. Procession to St. Paul’s. A similar carriage scene with St. Paul’s in the background. Cut VII. The Highlanders’ Address. Highlanders in a carriage with banners (cf. British Museum Satires No. 13934). Cut VIII. Refused Admittance into the Abbey. She gestures at the partly closed door between a sentry and the rejecting doorkeeper. Cut IX. Death-Bed of the Queen. The bed surrounded by weeping mourners. Cut X. Embarkation of Her Body at Harwich. The coffin is swung by tackle into a ship’s boat. Cut XI. The Queen’s Funeral Procession at Brunswick. The coffin, with crown and royal arms, is borne towards a church door (right) where girls scatter flowers. Cut XII. Queen Caroline’s Tomb. Britannia weeps, and her Lion registers anger, beside the tomb of Caroline The Injured Queen of England, topped by a large urn on which is her bust portrait. The text includes the funeral prayer, ‘A Dirge’ and ‘An Elegy . . .’ (28 11.): 11. 7-10: ‘A seperation hardly to be borne, Her only Daughter from her arms was torn! And next discarded–driven from her home, An unprotected Wanderer to roam!’ The verses below Cut XII end: ‘For the King shall be Judg’d with the poor of the earth, And, perhaps the poor man will be greater than he. Until that great day we leave Caroline’s wrongs, Meantime, may, “Repentance” her foes o’ertake; O grant it kind POWER, to whom alone it belongs’ AMEN. Here an end of this Hist’ry we make.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: An attempt to exhibit the leading events of the Queen’s life in cuts and verse.
  • Edition: Twelfth edition.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed and sold wholesale and retail by J. Catnatch, 2, Monmouth Court, 7 Dials, [December 1821]

Catalog Record

File 53 C292 821A++

Acquired November 2021

A devil rolled in snow

description below

A grotesque racist caricature of a buxom black woman in a white dress decorated with flowers and a bonnet with ribbons, grinning at the viewer and saying ‘Don’t you think you Fancy me now Massa’. Probably inspired by the “High Life in Philadelphia” series by Edward Williams Clay between 1828 and 1830 mocking supposed racial differences and modeled after George and Robert Cruikshank’s Life in London.

  • Title: devil rolled in snow [graphic] / [image of a hand] fecit.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1830?]

Catalog Record

830.00.00.163

Acquired February 2022

High life at five in the morning

description below

Print shows an interior view of a room; a duke has arrived home drunk at 5 a.m. (as shown on the longcase clock beside the door) accompanied by two attendants and watchman only to find his bedchamber occupied by another man. Through the open curtains around the bed can be seen a bare-breasted duchess. On the floor near the bed is an open book, “Memoirs of a woman of pleasure” (a reference to John Cleland’s Fanny Hill …) beside the chamber pot. As the duke with sword drawn, staggers forward, his rival climbs through a window in the background, leaving his clothes behind on a chair. A monkey dashes onto the table near the window on the heels of the husband’s rival but pulls down the tablecloth causing the items on the table to be strewn across the floor in the foreground; a book opened to pages “Chastity in the nobility a farce. Dedicated to their Graces the Duke & Dutchess xxx”, breaking a broken mirror, and sending the bottles and jars onto the floor. The bottles have labels “Viper drops” and “Surfeit water” and the jar is labeled “Lip salve”.

  • Title: High life at five in the morning [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, May 1st, 1769.

Catalog Record

769.05.01.01+

Acquired February 2022