Evening, or, The man of feeling

description belowThree men sit by a supper-table, a grandfather-clock behind them points to XI. The man on the left is having his jack-boots pulled off by a small boy; the boy stands astride his right leg pulling hard, his back to the man, who is scowling and pushes his other booted foot against the boy’s back; on the floor are a pair of spurs, a pair of slippers, and a boot-jack. A man (right) wearing a night-cap, but otherwise completely dressed and wearing spurred boots, leans one elbow on the table, his face contorted as if in pain, he holds his hand to his thigh. On the table beside him is a small packet inscribed “Diaculum”. In the centre, and on the farther side of the table, the third man leans both elbows on the table, his hair is tousled and his eyes are shut. A servant behind, yawning, is carrying off a square box, probably a wig-box, while a maidservant stands on the right, a candle in one hand, a warming-pan in the other, watching with amusement the efforts of the boy to pull off the boot. Three hats hang on the wall; a bottle, a plate, three wine-glasses, and a guttering candle, burnt down to the socket, stand on the table. See related image in the British Museum catalogue.

 

  • Title: Evening, or, The man of feeling [graphic] / design’d by W.H. Bunbury Esqr.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1818]

Catalog Record

816.00.00.81+

Acquired November 2020

Here we go up up up and there he goes down down downe

description below

A satire of the 1832 Reform Bill, with a see-saw with the Crown as the fulcrum. At the center is William IV, waving the Union flag; to the right is Lord Grey, seated on the lever, helping William balance with a scroll marked ‘Union’, with John Bull standing underneath, wedging the lever up with the ‘Reform Bill’; and to the right the Duke of Wellington tumbles backwards as the lever breaks under the weight of him and two huge scrolls marked ‘Anti Reform’.

 

  • Title: Here we go up up up and there he goes down down downe [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by O. Hodgson, 10 Cloth Fair, [ca. 1831]

Catalog Record

831.00.00.50

Acquired November 2020

Now that I have illustrated my three pints…

description below

“A fat bottle-nosed parson preaches from the upper story of a three-decker pulpit. Below him a lean curate sleeps, spectacles on forehead. A lank-haired rubicund clerk listens alertly. At the base of the design are the heads of a congregation, asleep, except for a flirting couple.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Now that I have illustrated my three pints, I shall proceed to draw some more ale!! [graphic] / J. ; W.H. fecit.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. May 12, 1823, by G. Humphrey, 24 St. James’s St. & 74 New Bond St., [12 May 1823]

Catalog Record

823.05.12.06

Acquired November 2020

Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper

description below

A stout man reclines on a chaise-longue; a small cup meets his lips, from which he drinks wine. Above this, a small tube from which cracked nuts descend. On the wall are two wheels and the mechanism which pours and decants the wine, and cracks the nuts.

 

  • Title: Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper, for the heats of summer [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.08+

Acquired November 2020

The six ologies

description below

description below

  • Printmaker: Stanley, Edward, 1779-1849, printmaker.
  • Title: The six ologies : viz. entomology, anthology, demonology, ornithology, craniology, apology.
  • Publication: [England] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1825]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 St787 825

Acquired November 2020

A Portugal catch for three voices

description below

“Three men sit, singing a catch, with a round table between them. A British officer (perhaps Cotton), wearing a cocked hat, sits in profile to the right, facing Dalrymple who sits (right) with tightly closed mouth, his hands on his knees. Between them, but with his chair from Dalrymple, sits a man in Spanish (here Portuguese) dress, wearing a feathered hat. The British officer sings: T’was You Sir-Hew – Twas Hew. that let the French Escape, That makes you look so blue Sir-Hew Sir Hew! He and the Portuguese (perhaps Freire) point minatory hands at Dalrymple, whose face is painted lead colour. On the wall are two pictures: (above the Portuguese) ‘A correct representation of the French Plunderers stopt in their progress by the Spanish Patriots.’ [at Baylen] and (above Dalrymple): ‘A Correct representation of the French Plunderers quitting Portugal for France – under a British Escort.’ In one a long train of wagons is stopped by armed men, in the other are ships in full sail. On the table are glasses and decanters of ‘Port and Calcavella’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A Portugal catch for three voices [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Octr. 1808 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [October 1808]

Catalog Record

808.10.00.04+

Acquired November 2020

The blessed effects of a united cabinet

description below

“George IV, seated on the throne, watches a display of jovial fraternization between John Bull and Pat, who dance, holding hands, each holding up a hat decorated respectively by rose and shamrock. A lanky garland of (thornless) roses and giant shamrocks drapes the crown on the back of the throne; one end is held up by Wellington (right), on the King’s left, the other by Peel on his right, so that the King is framed by it. J. B. is an obese and drink-blotched “cit”, with a snuff-box inscribed ‘Irish’ in his waistcoat pocket. Pat is a ragged Irish peasant, his bare legs swathed by twisted straw; his shillelagh lies on the ground; he looks with a broad but appraising grin at J. B., who sings: “Together reared together grown, Oh! let us now unite in one, Let friendship rivet the decree, Nor bigots sever Pat and Me!!!” Two discomfited ‘bigots’ depart on the left; one is a gouty parson using a crutch, with a ‘Petition against Concession’ hanging from his pocket, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15661, &c. The other is a Catholic bishop in robe and mitre. They say: ‘It’s time for us to be off.’ Above their heads flies a figure of Discord, her hair consisting of snakes which spit flame towards J. B. The King, with extended arm, says: ‘No more let Bigotry distract the Nation, Nor Priestcraft nurture lawless passion, Henceforth let rage and tumult cease, As brothers live and die in peace!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The blessed effects of a united cabinet, or, The glorious march of intellect [graphic] / T. Jones fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.17+

Acquired December 2020

The female agent

description below

“Heading to etched verses. Mrs. Clarke, seated on a dais, receives applicants for commissions who advance through a doorway (left). She sits on a drum, wearing a cocked hat and military sash over a white dress, and holds up a sword. A short fat soldier holds over her head a Union flag with the white horse of Hanover. Two soldiers stand at attention with fixed bayonets behind her, and a fat trumpeter blows his trumpet. Another Union flag, without the white horse, flies from the corner of the large dais. On the wall hangs a notice: ‘Half-pay Commissions at Half Price for Ready Money’. The applicants press forward in a bunch, headed by a fat and gouty ‘cit’ hobbling on two sticks, behind whom is a chimneysweep. The first of three verses: ‘Come all you brave Fellows who wish for Promotion. Wether Captain or Colonel or a General’s your notion. A Warehouse I keep for the sale of Commissions, And our Prices you’ll find will suit all conditions, You’ll be treated with Honor if you secrecy mark Sir For my Master is Noble and I am his Clarke Sir, You’ll be treated &c.’ The last lines: ‘But forget not the ready (Gold or Notes) for pray mark! My Master wants Money, & so does his Clarke. But forget not &c.’ The verses are bordered by spears which serve as posts for plump purses, symmetrically attached to them.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The female agent [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. March 1809 by Walker, No. 7 Cornhill, [March 1809]

Catalog Record

809.03.00.05+

Acquired June 2020

Mother Carey’s chickens

description below

“A stout and comely lady stands at the door of an ornamentally rustic cottage, shaking a cloth from which tiny officers leap out, holding money-bags. The cloth is inscribed in large letters ‘Pin Money instead of Allowance’. She says: “This is a profitable Plan of his and pays me a Devilish deal better than he can, besides the Patronage!!” Five elderly officers of normal size (right) watch their pigmy rivals with consternation. One looks through his glass, saying, “To waste ones health in unwholesome Climates an then fail of promotion because we cannot fee ****** or Army Agents Agents.!!” Another says: “Mother Careys Chickens by – then we shall have a storm indeed!” A third exclaims: “What to spend our lives in the service of our Country, and to be thus degraded by a parcel of Boys!!” He has a wooden leg and a patch over one eye. Another had lost his right arm, and the group seem hardly fit for active service. The ‘boys’ wear fashionable crescent-shaped cocked hats with plumes, the others old-fashioned hats with cockade, loop, and button. Over the door is inscribed in large letters ‘… mus Cottage’. It has the ornamental Gothic windows with leaded panes and thatched roof of fashionable rusticity. Beside it is a weeping willow. Below the title: ‘NB these Birds have lately been seen hovering about the Horse Guards’. Below the design: ‘a Storm Finch, or stormy petterel (the Mother Careys Chickens of the Sailors). Procellaria Pelagica of Linnœus. is seldom or never seen but in the great Ocean, and then when observed flying near a Ship, is the sure prognostication of a Storm, the analagy [sic] of effect has induced modern Naturalists to class these, with the Pelagica of Linnœus, tho differing in plumage’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Mother Carey’s chickens [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Novr. 1808 by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [November 1808]

Catalog Record

808.11.00.01+

Acquired June 2020

The grand coronation of Her Most Graceless Majesty C-r-l–e Columbina

description below

“A burlesque coronation of the Queen. She sits enthroned on a dais, raising her right foot with tipsy joviality. In her right hand as sceptre is a rod topped by a tiny cask which a naked Bacchus bestrides. The orb in her left hand is a decanter; on her head is a tilting punch-bowl. She watches her champion Wood (left) (acting the part of Dymoke, cf. British Museum Satires No. 14193), a grotesque figure in armour on a caparisoned ass (see British Museum Satires No. 14146). He has just thrown down the glove, pulling his braying mount on to its haunches, and looks up with a fatuous stare at the Queen. His helmet is topped by an owl from which clouds of smoke ascend (cf. British Museum Satires No. 14196). John Bull (right), a ‘cit’ wearing an ill-fitting wig and top-boots, stoops to pick up the glove, supporting himself by a cudgel inscribed My God My King a[nd my] Country. Between these two foreground figures stands a ragged newsboy holding his horn, the paper in his cap inscribed Brandy burgh [cf. British Museum Satires No. 14191] Gazette; slung from his shoulders is a large sheaf of his newspaper, Brandyburg Gazette Extraordinary–Baron B…..i to be Il Baron par Excellence–Ad- W – – d to be Earl Log [see British Museum Satires No. 14189]–Lady A H [Anne Hamilton] to be Spinster for Life–L. H – – d to be Marquis Doodle. Attendants are grouped round the Queen on the dais, which is under festooned curtains. These are (left to right): Denman and Brougham, in wig and gown, applauding and gesturing; two turbaned Turks; Bergami, handsome and complacent, at the Queen’s right hand. Slightly behind are a simian face, Lady Anne Hamilton wearing the feathered Scots cap of British Museum Satires No. 14175, and another woman, Italian in appearance (probably Countess Oldi). Behind the Queen’s chair on the right are two hooded figures, the more prominent, who holds a decanter, being Viscount Hood, the other perhaps Keppel Craven. Two naval officers must be Hownam and Flinn. On the canopy of the throne behind the Queen are her arms; the quarterings are wine-glasses, bottles, a tent (see British Museum Satires No. 13818), and a bath containing a tiny figure (see British Museum Satires No. 13819). The supporters are a satyr and a goat; the motto, Bergami and My Bottle [see British Museum Satires No. 14175]. On the extreme left, supported on Gothic arches, is a gallery crowded with ladies, as in Westminster Abbey at the Coronation. On a lower level, seen through the arches of the Abbey, is a dense proletarian crowd with banners, pikes, and caps of Liberty. The characters are indicated by inscriptions divided by vertical lines, as in British Museum Satires No. 14182, and centred by a cartouche. These are (left to right): Mobility in Attendance. The Champion of Absolute Wisdom [see British Museum Satires No. 13899] on his renowned Steed. The Keepers of her Majesty’s Conscience [her Counsel]. Her Majesty’s Lord Great Chamberlain Her Majesty’s Privy Counsellor Knight Commander of the Bath Chief Performer of the Canopy Service and Courier Extraordinary [Bergami]. Hooded Doodles in Waiting [Lord Hood and his companion]. Barons of the Bedposts. Performers of the Canopy Service [the naval officers]. In the cartouche: If any Person of what degree soever, high or low, shall deny or gainsay our Puppet C . r . l . . e Columbina [see British Museum Satires No. 14120] of Brandy-burgh House, of the United Kingdoms of Soberness and Chastity, Defender of the easy Virtues &c &c the Right of being Crowned with a crown Bowl of Imperial Punch, or that she should not enjoy the same, here is her Champion, who saith he doth not care a Drug, being ready in person to lay a bet that she is, and in this wager will venture his Eighteen Pence against a Shilling wherever, and whenever his Adversary may choose.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: The grand coronation of Her Most Graceless Majesty C-r-l–e Columbina, the first queen of all the radicals &c &c &c, July 19th, 1821 [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, August 6th, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.08.06.01+

Acquired March 2020