An exact representation of the depositing the body

The coffin of Queen Caroline on a cloth-covered platform over which pallbearers hold an elaborate black canopy is carried down the aisle of church, followed by a minister who lifts his right arm as if speaking from the text in his left hand. To the right stand young women who throw flowers from their baskets as the procession passes. On the right, with an organ behind, soldiers stand in attention holding torches.

  • Title: An exact representation of the depositing the body of her late Majesty Queen Caroline in the family vault at Brunswick, Augt. 24, 1821 [graphic] : with the Revd. J.W.G. Wolff delivering her funeral prayer amidst the tears and sobs of the company.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d by W.B. Walker, 4 Fox & Knot Court, Cow Lane, London, [not before 24 August 1821]

Catalog Record

821.08.24.02+ Framed

Acquired September 2019

Letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn

see description belowA letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn, in a secretary’s hand, which conveys a sense of her isolation living in London after her separation from the Prince of Wales. The letter begins with her friendly thanks to Lady Abercorn for the “keepsake” or “talisman” which she sent onto Dr. Pimberton that she suspects would have decorated “the grand Mufti”. She continues with apologies for the need to decline her invitation to the seaside due to her mother’s (Princess Augusta) uncertain health and her “knowing so few people in England”. She talks of other mutual acquatiances who have visited her, the Aberdeens and Lady Maria Chaperone, and reports on Lady Maria’s recovery. Caroline writes of her pleasure in Walter Scott’s visits and a lively evening with Monk Lewis who told “ghost stories the whole evening” and how his embellishment of a story she told made it unrecognizable. She end with regards to her and her family “who have not yet forgotten me and my nonsense.”

  • Author: Caroline, Queen, consort of George IV, King of Great Britain, 1768-1821.
  • Title: Letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn, 1810 May 3 : manuscript.
  • Production: London?, 1810 May 3.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss File 146

Acquired July 2019

Queen Carolines triumph on the defeat

see description belowQueen Caroline is seated in a carriage pulled by two white horses lead by a young page towards the right; she holds a walking-stick in her hand, sceptor-like over her shoulder and wears a fashionable hat and a small smile on her face as she looks out at the viewer. She is accompanied by two men in armor and wearing plummed helmets. The one on the far-side of the carriage holds a sign “The people and the Queens Guards”. Another sign in the background on the right reads “It is better to put your trust in the Lord than confidence in princes.” A crown is shown on the far right.

  • Title: Queen Carolines triumph on the defeat of the Bill of Pains and Penalties, Novr. 10, 1820 [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d by W.B. Walker, 4 Fox & Knot Court, Cow Lane, London, [not before 10 November 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.11.10.01 Framed

Acquired September 2019

Her Majesty Queen Caroline landing at Dover

Queen Caroline walks down a plank balanced between a jolly boat and the shore; she is assisted by her son-in-law Prince Leopald, dressed in black. A cheering crowd stands on the beach, waving their hats in the air, behind an officer who tips his hat at the Queen. Sailors push the boat onto the shingle while a ship called “Prince Leopold” (in reference to her son-in-law) is anchored in the distance.

  • Title: Her Majesty Queen Caroline landing at Dover, on the 5th of June, 1820, after an absence of 5 years, to demand her rights, dignities, & priveleges as Queen of England [graphic] : dedicated to the feelings of the British Nation, by W.B. Walker.
  • Publication: [London] : [W.B. Walker], [not before 5 June 1820]

Catalog Record

820.06.05.01+ Framed

Acquired September 2019

 

Justice

Justice. Detailed description below

“Justice stands on a small rocky plateau surrounded by waves. She holds up a pair of scales; on one scale (left) stands the Queen, noble and dignified, in royal robes, the crown at her feet. She far outweighs the other scale, on which is a huge green bag: ‘Ev[ide]nce a[gainst] [t]he [Que]en’; Castlereagh, Sidmouth, and Canning stand round it, with a serpent as pendant to the crown. The Queen holds out a scroll headed ‘Righ .. of .. Queen’ and an open book: ‘Liturgy’. Castlereagh holds out to her a scroll headed ‘50,000 pr An’; he says: “Another Bag (now almost ready) Will make the Balance firm & steady, And certain other pond’rous stuff Will make the Lady light enough.” Sidmouth flourishes a clyster-pipe (cf. British Museum Satires No. 9849). Canning stands behind the Bag on the extreme right; he says: “I wish to God that I was out Of this infernal mounting Scale, For plainly I percieve a rout, And that the Lady must prevail.” The Queen: “Vipers Go! I can’t endure you, You wrong me I assure you, Yet still I spurn the wrong, and view, With calmness all your Bag can do.” Below the title : ‘”Do thou inspire the stroke “With prevalence divine – as thine the wrong, “Vengeance and punishment to thee belong; “The injur’d state of Innocece [sic] restore, “Crush the bold insults of aspiring pow’r, “Shine like thy radiant source, and mak the world adore.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Justice [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1 August 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.08.01.01

Acquired May 2019

A bill to deprive Her Majesty…

see description below

  • Author: Hone, William, 1780-1842, author, publisher.
  • Title: bill to deprive Her Majesty Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of the title, prerogatives, rights, privileges, and pretensions of Queen Consort of this realm, and to dissolve the marriage between His Majesty and the said Queen.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed by W. Hone, Ludgate Hill, London, [1820]

Catalog Record 

File 53 C292 820b

Acquired May 2019

 

Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph

Cary Brunswick o' the Guelph. Detailed description below

“Heading to a broadside engraved in two columns. A stalwart Highland soldier, with plumed bonnet, stands outside an open doorway (left) crowded with cringing Italians. He lunges furiously towards them with clenched fist, saying: “Filthy brutes! i ‘ts for new boots, That a’ you Rogues are swearing at her”. The most prominent of the witnesses (cf. British Museum Satires No. 13762) are Majocchi (see British Museum Satires No. 13827) and Demont, see British Museum Satires No. 13856. Over the doorway: ‘Rogues Retreat’; at the corner of the building: ‘Cotton Garden’ [see British Museum Satires No. 13824]. Behind (right) is the Thames. The Highlander’s words are from the second verse of the song: ‘Air Tibby Fowler o’ the Glen’. The third of five verses: ‘Fie upon the filthy louns! There’s o’er mony swearing at her; Fifteen came frae German towns; There’s eight and fifty swearing at her; Swearing at her, mumbling at her, Tumbling at her, canna hit her; Tawdry louns! its for new gowns, The hizzies a’ are swearing at her.’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [September 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.09.00.01+

Acquired May 2019

Dido in despair

Dido in despair. Detailed description below

“A parody of British Museum Satires No. 9752, Gillray’s ‘Dido in Despair!’ The Queen takes the place of Lady Hamilton, in a similar pose but tearing her long black hair with more of rage and less of grief. She wears a bracelet on each arm, one inscribed ‘BB’ (for Bergami), the other ‘MW’ (for Wood). On the floor are gifts to the Queen. Her bare right foot rests on a large cake inscribed ‘MW’ on which are various emblems: a large crown, which she kicks over, busts of Wood, Bergami, Lieut. Hownam, and an unidentified person; also a goat, an ass, and a cat. This stands on a paper: ‘Mr Trifle’s Love to the Q[ueen]’. A huge round of beef is ticketed ‘With Mr Suets Love to the Q–n’; with this is a roll of ‘Cat’s Meat’. A model of a pair of stays enclosed in a glass case stands on two papers: ‘Glass-blower’s Delight’ and ‘O stay my love my Cary dear’. A pair of breeches of metal is ‘For Bat [Bergami] or Cat ad libitum from the Brazier[s]’. Caricatures lie near a pair of slippers inscribed ‘BB’; the uppermost is of Bergami drinking at a table between Wood and the Queen. A book is ‘Catalogue of Fancy Men’. The glass on the dressing-table is topped by a crescent; on it hang miniatures of Bergami and Wood (cf. No. 13858). The table is covered with decanters, one labelled ‘Brandy’ [see British Museum Satires No. 14175], glass, pill-box, and boxes of ‘Rouge’, ‘Brick dust’, and ‘Court Plaister’. The curtains of the bed are fringed with gold and hang from a pelmet. In place of Gillray’s open sash-window is a closed French window; outside is a landscape, with two asses, and a lake (Como) with a sailing-boat.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: Dido in despair [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., April 3rd, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.04.03.01

Acquired March 2019

Modesty!

Caroline and Bergami sit together in an opera-box

Caroline and Bergami sit together in an opera-box, frowning angrily at the occupants of the pit, all men, who look up at the box disapprovingly. Bergami holds a bottle labelled ‘Essence of Bergamot’ and wears a braided hussar uniform. Caroline is very décolletée, with loose black curls and a four-cornered headdress. The Arms of the Republic of Genoa are on the wall beside them with a harp and musical score below. The front of the box is decorated with two cupids holding a ribbon.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: Modesty! [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., June 7, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.06.07.02

Acquired March 2019

John Bull’s little darling

John Bull's little darling. Detailed description below.

“Queen Caroline, stout and raddled, with black ringlets, stands full-face and four-square, bending forward as if bowing, with a fixed stare from black beady eyes. She wears the feathered hat (caricatured) of the ‘trial’, and a fur-bordered pelisse. Under her right arm is a rolled document, ‘List of [Addresses’; in her left hand she awkwardly raises her skirts in order to bow. She stands on a grass plot in front of Brandenburgh House. Below the design: … ‘Lo! yonder she walketh in maiden sweetness, with innocence on her mind and modesty in her cheek.– Her hand seeketh employment; her foot delighteth not in gadding abroad.– She is cloathed with neatness; she is fed with temperance; humility and meekness are as a crown of glory circling her head.– Her breast is the mansion of goodness; and therefere [sic] she suspecteth no evil in others.– Decency is in all her words; in her answers are mildness and truth.– Submission and obedience are the lessons of her life; and peace and happiness are her rewards.– Before her steps walketh Prudence; and Virtue attendeth at her right hand. Her eye speaketh softness and love; but discretion with a sceptre sitteth on her brow.– The tongue of the licentious is dumb in her presence; the awe of her virtue keepeth him silent.– Happy Bartolomeo [Bergami]!!! he putteth his heart in her bosom, and receiveth Comfort.– Thus the prudence of her management is an honor to her husband, and he must hear her praise with silent delight.–!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: John Bull’s little darling [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Jany. 25, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.01.25.02

Acquired March 2019