A harlots progress. Plate VI

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 6 of A harlot’s progress: A dilapidated room with Moll Hackabout’s friends, mostly prostitutes, gathered around her open coffin, several of them weeping; one young woman stands with her back to the scene as she gazes at herself in the mirror. On the right, a clergyman spills his brandy as he surreptitiously gropes beneath a woman’s skirt; Moll’s serving woman, standing at the coffin with a wine bottle and glass in hand scowls at the pair. Under the window and to the left, the undertaker flirts with a pretty young prostitute who picks a handkerchief from his pocket. In the foreground Moll’s small son plays with a spinning top. Sprigs of yew (rosemary?) decorate her coffin; a plate of yew rests on the floor at the parson’s feet, another spring at her son’s feet.

  • Title: A harlots progress. Plate VI [graphic] : Her funeral properly attended = Pompe de ses funérailles / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.14+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

 

A harlot’s progress. Plate II

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 2 of A harlot’s progress: Mary Hackabout (left), now a harlot and mistress of a wealthy London Jew, exposes her breast and kicks over a tea table to divert his attention from the presence of her younger lover who hides behind the door of the room with her maid servant. A monkey and young black servant boy in a feathered turban look on the scene with frighten expressions. The mask and mirror in the lower left corner and the paintings of scenes from the Old Testament (Jonah IV.8 and 2 Samuel VI.1-5) hanging on the wall further amplify the artist’s moral message.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate II [graphic] : In high keeping by a Jew = Un juif l’entretien somptueusement / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.10+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

A harlot’s progress. Plate I

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 1 of A harlot’s progress: A scene outside the Bell Inn: a country girl, Moll Hackabout, having just arrived on the York Wagon (seen on the right), meets an extravagantly dressed bawd (Mother Needham); a clergyman on horseback fails to notice the encounter, but a lecherous old gentleman (Colonel Charteris) eyes the girl with anticipation. In the lower left the girl’s initials “H.M.” (M[ary?] Hackabout, initials reversed on this copy) are on her portmanteau, next to which is a basket with a goose with a note around its neck, “For my Loving Cosen in Tems Stret in London”, presumably the person who has failed to meet her. In the background a woman hangs out her laundry on a balcony. A clergyman on horseback fails to notice the encounter as his horse feeds on hay next to the wagon. In the back of the wagon, four other country girls sit holding onto a rail.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate I [graphic] : Innocence betrayed, or The journey to London = L’innocence trahie, ou, Le voyage de Londres / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.09+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

He marries a rich old widow

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 5 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 136): Tom and a wealthy old woman are being married in the dilapidated church of St. Marylebone. The bride has only one eye and growths on her forehead; the IHS on the wall behind her serve as a mock halo. In contrast the old woman is attended by a beautiful young woman who has already caught Tom’s eye. In the background on the left, the elderly pew opener pushes Sarah Young, carrying Tom’s child in her arms, and Sarah’s mother; she shakes her keys in their faces to prevent them from entering the church to stop the marriage. Two dogs in the lower left of the image mirror the courtship of Tom and his bride; the courted dog has only one eye. The clergyman is assisted at the altar by a clerk, and a charity-boy kneels at the bride’s feet offering a hassock. The Poor Box on the left is covered with a cobweb; there is a crack down the center of the slab with the Commandments on the wall behind the clergyman.

  • Title: He marries a rich old widow [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.05+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Clerical anecdotes, and Parson’s comic songster

title page

  • Author: Rodger, Alexander, 1784-1846, author.
  • Title: Clerical anecdotes, and Parson’s comic songster : containing Advice to the priest-ridden / by Alexander Rodger, a Glasgow weaver. Also, A joiner’s bill.
  • Publication: Edinburgh : Printed and published by W. and H. Robinson, 11, Greenside Street, [not before 1842]

Catalog Record

763 R691 841

Acquired November 2019

 

Vicar returning from duty

A fat parson riding (right to left) on a small horse arrives at the high iron gate of his house, which is seen in the background. He points arrogantly to a groom in livery, who stands (left) holding another horse whose front half appears on the left. The groom raises his hat. A butler stands in front of the gate. In the distance among trees (right) is a church spire.

  • Title: Vicar returning from duty [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record 

812.00.00.103

Acquired September 2019

Christmass boxes

A satire, divided into quarters, with four small scenes of different episodes of persons trying to collect their Christmas boxes. In the first square in the upper left, a plump supplicant in an apron holds out his hat to a scowling-faced man with a kerchief tied over his hat and a walking stick under his arm as they meet in a road outside a building with a lamp. Behind him on the wall is a sign posted “Miser’. In response to the request, the miser says “Give you a Christmass box. Curse you don’t I pay you for your meat.” On the top row, right, a thin man (a grave digger?) with a pipe in his mouth, bows to an obese clergyman, with a fat dog at his heel, as they stand in the graveyard of a church. The gravedigger asks, “Most worthy Parson give me a Christmass box.” The Parson replies, “Give you a halter you rascal. What should I give you a Christmass box for.” In the lower left, clergyman shakes his walking stick at a surprised man who is carrying a large box on his back and secured with a strap over his forehead. The clergyman says to the laborer, “If you ever ask me for a Christmass box again, I’ll physic you to death.” They are standing in front of building with a lantern and sign that reads “Gargle Apothycary.” The fourth square, lower right, shows old, hag-faced woman with a hat and muff standing in a parlor as she slaps the face of an astonished footman. She tells him, “Take that you saucy rascal for a Xmass box!” He replies, “What’s that for. I did not want a box on the ear, not I.”

  • PrintmakerNewton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker, artist.
  • TitleChristmass boxes [graphic] / drawn & etchd. by Rd. Newton.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, 50 Oxford St., Decemr. 25, 1794.

Catalog Record 

794.12.25.02+

Acquired May 2017

Sir Harry Trelawny diary

Sir Harry Trewlawny’s diary with the first entry dated 1785 August 17 and the last September 2nd all in a single hand. A wonderfully chatty diary in which he talks about farming matters, the crops that are being harvested, maintaining the shoreline property, as well as the management of his current holdings, acquisition of land and leases, including the potential purchase of Bochym Manor, on The Lizard. He reports on meetings with tenants and relays friendly gossip about his circle of acquaintances. He also discusses the candidates for several curacies under his control and the ministers in his neighborhood.

  • AuthorTrelawny, Harry, Sir, 1756-1834.
  • TitleManuscript diary, circa 1785.
  • ProductionLondon, 1785.

Catalog Record 

LWL Mss Vol. 237

Acquired July 2017

The historians

A lady (Mrs. Catherine Macaulay) with an aquiline profile sits at a table opposite a clergy man (Dr. Wilson) as she writes with a quill pen. The walls are lined with full bookshelves separated in the middle by a fireplace with a mantelpiece on which sits a bust of “Alfred rex”. Both figures wear the same enormous hair as in British Museum no. 5441.

  • PrintmakerDarly, Mattina, printmaker.
  • TitleThe historians [graphic] / Mattina Darly sculp.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. May 1, 1777, by MDarly, 39 Strand, [1 May 1777]

Catalog Record 

777.05.01.08

Acquired April 2018

The grounds

Satire on Robert Walpole, showing the grounds for the Motion to remove him from office.

  • TitleThe grounds [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, March 7, 1741.

Catalog Record

741.03.07.02.3+

Acquired March 2017