The blessed effects of a united cabinet

description below

“George IV, seated on the throne, watches a display of jovial fraternization between John Bull and Pat, who dance, holding hands, each holding up a hat decorated respectively by rose and shamrock. A lanky garland of (thornless) roses and giant shamrocks drapes the crown on the back of the throne; one end is held up by Wellington (right), on the King’s left, the other by Peel on his right, so that the King is framed by it. J. B. is an obese and drink-blotched “cit”, with a snuff-box inscribed ‘Irish’ in his waistcoat pocket. Pat is a ragged Irish peasant, his bare legs swathed by twisted straw; his shillelagh lies on the ground; he looks with a broad but appraising grin at J. B., who sings: “Together reared together grown, Oh! let us now unite in one, Let friendship rivet the decree, Nor bigots sever Pat and Me!!!” Two discomfited ‘bigots’ depart on the left; one is a gouty parson using a crutch, with a ‘Petition against Concession’ hanging from his pocket, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15661, &c. The other is a Catholic bishop in robe and mitre. They say: ‘It’s time for us to be off.’ Above their heads flies a figure of Discord, her hair consisting of snakes which spit flame towards J. B. The King, with extended arm, says: ‘No more let Bigotry distract the Nation, Nor Priestcraft nurture lawless passion, Henceforth let rage and tumult cease, As brothers live and die in peace!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The blessed effects of a united cabinet, or, The glorious march of intellect [graphic] / T. Jones fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.17+

Acquired December 2020

A political reflection

description below

“George IV as the ‘Great Babe’ lies asleep in his cradle rocked by Lady Conyngham, while Wellington, seated before a pier-glass, places the crown on his own head. The glass reflects the dark emaciated features of British Museum Satires No. 15520. The Duke wears uniform with boots and sword. On a table below the glass the sceptre and orb lie on a cushion. Lady Conyngham, with a towering coiffure as in British Museum Satires No. 15508, croons: Oh slumber my darling | The time may soon come | When thy rest may be broken | By Trumpet & Drum [the last three words in large letters]. The infant sucks a thumb; a gouty foot projects from the coverlet. On the floor is a line of toys: a sailing boat on wheels, a model of Buckingham Palace reconstructed by Nash as in British Museum Satires No. 15668, a giraffe (see British Museum Satires No. 15425), a Life Guard on a toy horse, a Foot-Guard, a dismantled or unfinished ship resting on a prostrate toy soldier. A napkin on a towel-horse (right) indicates a nursery.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A political reflection [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. February 1828]

Catalog Record

828.02.00.05+

Acquired June 2020

Lessons to a young prince, by an old statesman

title page

  • Author: Williams, David, 1738-1816, author.
  • Title: Lessons to a young prince, by an old statesman, on the present disposition in Europe to a general revolution … : with the addition of a lesson on the mode of studying and profiting by Reflections on the French revolution, by … Edmund Burke.
  • Edition: The third edition.
  • Publication: London : Printed for H. D. Simmons, Pater-noster Row, MDCCXC [1790]

Catalog Record

53 G294 W721

Acquired April 2020

The reconciliation

 

The reconciliation. Detailed description below

“The King steps forward to embrace the Prince of Wales, who throws himself into his father’s arms, saying, “against Heaven – and before thee, and am no more worthy——” (the words fade out). George III wears court dress, the Prince’s dress is tattered and dishevelled, his pocket hangs inside out, the garter at his knee – ‘Honi soit’ – is loose. Behind the King stands the Queen on the door-step, half-smiling, her arms outstretched. Two pleased princesses look over her shoulder. Just outside the door stand Pitt and Moira watching the reconciliation, Pitt with a benign expression, Moira more doubtfully; both wear footmen’s court-livery, of military cut; Moira wears jack-boots. Pitt holds a paper: ‘New Union Act Britains best Hope’, implying that he is the author of the ‘Union’. Moira holds Pitt’s arm. Beside the house (right) are a tree and a balustrade, against which grow a rose-bush and a thistle.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the Gillray print of which this is a copy.
“A close copy by Williams, with additions, apparently ante-dated … Behind the Prince Lord Dartmouth, Lord Chamberlain, stands full face, holding his wand, his gold key attached to his coat. Pitt and Moira turn their eyes slyly towards each other: both weep large burlesqued tears, as do the Queen and Dartmouth.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The reconciliation [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Novr. 18, 1804, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [18 November 1804]

Catalog Record 

804.11.18.01+

Acquired May 2019

The Princes disastar

The Princes disastar. Detailed description below

“The Prince of Wales falls from an overturning phaeton or curricle. He is about to fall on the prostrate body of Mrs. Fitzherbert (left), who lies on her back, her breasts exposed, in an attitude intended to be indecorous. She lies under a steep bank or rock beside a country road. The horse rears behind the Prince.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title: The Princes disastar [sic], or, A fall in Fitz [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by James Aitken, Little Russell Court, Drury Lane, [July 1788]

Catalog Record 

788.07.00.08+

Acquired April 2019

John Bull’s little darling

John Bull's little darling. Detailed description below.

“Queen Caroline, stout and raddled, with black ringlets, stands full-face and four-square, bending forward as if bowing, with a fixed stare from black beady eyes. She wears the feathered hat (caricatured) of the ‘trial’, and a fur-bordered pelisse. Under her right arm is a rolled document, ‘List of [Addresses’; in her left hand she awkwardly raises her skirts in order to bow. She stands on a grass plot in front of Brandenburgh House. Below the design: … ‘Lo! yonder she walketh in maiden sweetness, with innocence on her mind and modesty in her cheek.– Her hand seeketh employment; her foot delighteth not in gadding abroad.– She is cloathed with neatness; she is fed with temperance; humility and meekness are as a crown of glory circling her head.– Her breast is the mansion of goodness; and therefere [sic] she suspecteth no evil in others.– Decency is in all her words; in her answers are mildness and truth.– Submission and obedience are the lessons of her life; and peace and happiness are her rewards.– Before her steps walketh Prudence; and Virtue attendeth at her right hand. Her eye speaketh softness and love; but discretion with a sceptre sitteth on her brow.– The tongue of the licentious is dumb in her presence; the awe of her virtue keepeth him silent.– Happy Bartolomeo [Bergami]!!! he putteth his heart in her bosom, and receiveth Comfort.– Thus the prudence of her management is an honor to her husband, and he must hear her praise with silent delight.–!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: John Bull’s little darling [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Jany. 25, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.01.25.02

Acquired March 2019

The green bag, it’s contents & all it’s appendages

The green bag. Detailed description below.

“A hand, ‘Manus Populi’, extends into the design from the upper margin, holding a chain from which hangs a pair of scales. On one (right), close to the ground, sits the Queen, hands crossed on her breast, saying: “My innocence will support me & my Country will protect me– 10 Great Men against one unprotected Woman are fearful odds.” The other scale, high in the air, is completely filled by a green bag, see British Museum Satires No. 13735, from the mouth of which emerges the head of George IV, crowned. Attached to the beam, by a rope round his neck, hangs a military officer, holding a huge key; as a makeweight he dangles vainly against the left side of the King’s bag. Three men standing below pull at the scale, trying to drag it down: they are Sidmouth (left), a judge in back view (? Leach), and Castlereagh (right), who says: “We cannot do it, and I told you so at first, & if she opens her bagwe shall be stifled all of us.” The King looks down at them with a distressed expression, saying: “Pull you lubbers.””–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heeston, active 1820, printmaker.
  • Title: The green bag, it’s contents & all it’s appendages are insufficient to turn the scale of public opinion [graphic] / Heeston fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, July 11, 1820.

Catalog Record 

820.07.11.01+

Acquired April 2019

The modern genius of history at her toilet

The modern genius of history at her toilet

Caroline, wearing a chemise and high-strapped shoes, stands admiring herself in front of a full-length mirror. With her right hand she adjusts a feather in her elaborate headdress, which is adorned with the Prince of Wales’s feathers on the far side and several pointed feathers on the near side, two of which resemble horns; her left hand rests on her hip. Bergami stands behind her in astonished delight, his hands raised in the air; a garment hangs from his left arm, and several towels or pieces of clothing marked with the initials “B B” are strewn on the floor. A man and a woman peer in on the scene from an adjoining room, the man with a pleased look on his face and the woman with one of surprise. On the wall behind Bergami hangs an oval mirror, the decorative frame of which includes a figure of Cupid standing atop a goat while shooting an arrow. A book with “History” on its spine lies on its side in the left foregraound; a burning candle in its holder sits upon the book.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: The modern genius of history at her toilet [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., May 20, 1821.

Catalog record 

821.05.20.02

Acquired March 2019

A fishing party

A fishing party. detailed description below

“Pushed by Knighton and pulled by Lady Conyngham, George IV, more corpulent than in other prints, walks in an ornate circular stand or support on castors (as used for toddling children, cf. British Museum satires no. 7497) towards Virginia Water (right), his fishing-rod against his shoulder. He wears a hat with a wide curving brim inscribed á la Townsend [cf. British Museum satires no. 10293], double-breasted tail-coat, breeches, and pumps; his right arm rests on the ring of the stand, in his hand is a small book: Old Izack [Walton]. From the stand dangles an ornate reticule: Fish Bag; the base is decorated with two fat squatting mandarins. Lady Conyngham looks over her right shoulder at the King, puffing from her effort, but singing Rule Britannia; the crossbar at which she tugs is a sceptre. She wears an enormous ribbon-trimmed bonnet and décolletée dress; the hook from the King’s line has caught in her dress which strains across her vast posterior as she leans forward. Knighton wears a court-suit with bag-wig and sword. He pushes with both hands with great concentration, singing, Send him Victorious. In his coat-pocket are a clyster-pipe and a paper: Petition of the Unborn Babes. A signpost terminating in a realistic hand points To Virginia Water. There is a background of trees and water.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A fishing party [graphic] : what great enjoyments rise ‘from trivial things'”.
  • Edition: [Later state with scroll added to Knighton’s coat-tails].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. June 27th, 1827, by S.W. Fores, Pciadilly [sic], [27 June 1827]

Catalog Record 

827.06.27.01+

Acquired March 2019

Modern plays

Modern plays

Four scenes in one plate, each with a separate title; the subjects are Napoleon’s defeat in Russia, the Prince Regent, a domestic scenes, each characterised by a disaster, the first shows a man in a bedroom beside a coffin, dancing, and last, a man on the floor being beaten by his wife after upsetting the tea table (shown with two demons)

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern plays [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1815]

Catalog Record 

815.00.00.17+

Acquired October 2018