Common place book 1811 : manuscript

description below

A commonplace book that collects a number of unusual entries on subjects as diverse as an example of a contradictory letter or letter of hatred; a description of an advertisement for a “Fantocini” puppet-show in Lewisham in 1812; the spread of venereal disease; paper money at the cape of good hope; guilt and shame; rapes of the Romans; divorce, etc. The book is indexed and many entries are identified with author, text and page number and it is reasonable to suppose that this a record of his use of books and readership. Following the commonplace section is a 10,000 word lecture of free-masonry and a section on the analysis of soil, stone and urine.

 

  • Author: Lance, E. J. (Edward Jarman)
  • Title: Common place book 1811 : manuscript / E.J. Lance.
  • Production: England, 1811-1856

Catalog Record

LWL Mss Vol. 255

Acquired June 2020

Tooke family album of unpublished correspondence

description below

Quarto album, with 29 autograph letters (three being fragments), c. 100 pages in total (some laid in loose); two commonplace manuscripts c. 35 and c. 62 pages; a large fragment of a play c. 90 pages (on rectos only), comprising most of(?) Act II, all of Acts III and IV and most of(?) Act V; and an unrecorded printed folio broadside advertising the sale by auction on 1 November 1820 of an ‘Estate in the Vale of Clwyd, Denbighshire’ (Elizabeth Tooke’s family property). The 29 letters are to and from various members of the family, with 14 being from the period the family spent in Russia.

 

  • Author: Tooke, William, 1744-1820.
  • Title: Tooke family album of unpublished correspondence and commonplace manuscripts : manuscript.
  • Production: St. Petersburg and London, bulk 1773-1811

Catalog Record

LWL Mss Vol. 254

Acquired March 2020

Journal of a tour in the year 1745

description below

An anonymous journal of a tour that begins on May 14th in Warrington, Lancashire and passes through Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Lincoln, Leicester, Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridge, Huntingdon, Northampton, Buckingham, Oxon, Berkshire, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Somerset, Gloucester, Worcester, Staffs, Salop and Cheshire, finishing on July 5th in Chester — a total of 703 miles.

 

  • Title: Journal of a tour in the year 1745 : manuscript.
  • Production: Liverpool?, England, circa 1745.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss Vol. 257

Acquired February 2020

Covetousness

description below

An illustrated manuscript leaf in an 18th-century hand. In the upper portion of the recto side is a large vignette of a man in traditional Jewish garb, seated at a table, weighing coins as they spill from two cornucopias, one to each side and held by a cherub whose faces are turned away; the table is covered with coins. The prose text below is captioned “Covetousness” and consists of seven lines beginning: “Every step that a man makes beyond a moderate & reasonable Provision, is taking so much from the worthiness of his own spirit. …” This quote is taken from an popular 18th-century British courtesy book that appeared in many editions but was first published in 1715.: The Gentleman’s Library, containing rules for conduct in all parts of life. The scribe writes using Gothic lettering in pen and brown ink and decorates the perimeter of the the text and image with billowing flourishes. Printed above in a ribbon banner is a saying from Horace, “certum voto pete finem”–“set a definite limit to your desire.” On the verso written in pencil by a contemporary hand : Mind the noblest, he the law of Kings The noble mind distinguishes perfection It aids & strengthens virtue where it meets her ‘Tis not to be sported with.

  • Artist: Castle, William, active 1785, artist.
  • Title: Covetousness : manuscript / Wm. Castle.
  • Production: England, 1785.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss File 152+

Acquired June 2020

Journal of a tour through France and Italy

page from journalHolograph diary of the author’s trip to France and Italy in a single hand describing the author’s Grand Tour two years after the end of the Napoleonic Wars : The hallmarks of a half pay British officer in the midst of a rather hopeless feeling peace. Clearly an admirer of classical architecture, he makes careful note of remaining classical elements in towns like Avignon and Lyon (“The town of Lyon is by no means handsome. The houses are much crowded and the streets narrow, and dirtier if possible than those of Paris”), and appears very much more affectionate towards what was there, rather than what is. He is nevertheless much struck by the wonders of Florence as he travels towards what his conspicuous classical education clearly regards as the ultimate destination: the city of Rome. In a rather pleasing exhibition of mingled scholarship and military professionalism, he spends a lot of time discussing the historical strategic qualities and shortfalls of many of his stopping points. The journal is erudite, vigorous and detailed.

  • Title: Journal of a tour through France and Italy / by an officer stationed with Wellington’s Army of Occupation at St. Pol, Pas de Calais : manuscript.
  • Production: France and Italy, 1817.

Catalog Record 

LWL Mss Vol. 251

Acquired October 2019

James Lucas’s tour to Paris in 1816

handwritten title pageHolograph diary transcribed by Charles Lucas from memorandum written by his cousin James Lucas during a tour to France in 1816.

  • Author: Lucas, James.
  • Title: James Lucas’s tour to Paris in 1816 : manuscript.
  • Production: France, 1816.

Catalog Record 

LWL Mss Vol. 249

Acquired October 2019

 

Letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn

see description belowA letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn, in a secretary’s hand, which conveys a sense of her isolation living in London after her separation from the Prince of Wales. The letter begins with her friendly thanks to Lady Abercorn for the “keepsake” or “talisman” which she sent onto Dr. Pimberton that she suspects would have decorated “the grand Mufti”. She continues with apologies for the need to decline her invitation to the seaside due to her mother’s (Princess Augusta) uncertain health and her “knowing so few people in England”. She talks of other mutual acquatiances who have visited her, the Aberdeens and Lady Maria Chaperone, and reports on Lady Maria’s recovery. Caroline writes of her pleasure in Walter Scott’s visits and a lively evening with Monk Lewis who told “ghost stories the whole evening” and how his embellishment of a story she told made it unrecognizable. She end with regards to her and her family “who have not yet forgotten me and my nonsense.”

  • Author: Caroline, Queen, consort of George IV, King of Great Britain, 1768-1821.
  • Title: Letter from Caroline of Brunswick to Lady Abercorn, 1810 May 3 : manuscript.
  • Production: London?, 1810 May 3.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss File 146

Acquired July 2019