Protestant descendency

<img alt ... />

“An ancient Gothic church in the middle distance stands on a grassy hill inscribed ‘Protestant Ascendency’; under the hill (left) is a cave, ‘Cave of Catholic Ascendency’, in which are barrels of ‘Gun . Pow[der]’. A fat bare-footed friar walks away from the cave towards the picture-plane, carrying a lighted candle, and slyly laying a train of powder on the road to the cave. Standing round the church is a crowd of country people, listening to a parson who holds out to them a ‘Petition to Parliament’. They are unconscious, not only that the ground beneath them is mined, but that men (right) are tugging at a rope looped round the steeple, which is about to crash. The rope-pullers are in the foreground (right); at the extreme end is Wellington with his back to the church, straining hard. Next is Peel, wearing an orange waistcoat (cf. British Museum Satires No. 15690) badly stained by the rope; Brougham, a broom-girl dressed as in British Museum Satires No. 14769, is next, with Mackintosh in Highland costume beside him. In front of them is Burdett, very tall and thin, holding up his hat and shouting ‘Down with it–never mind the People’ [see British Museum Satires No. 16058]. In front is O’Connell, in wig and gown, shouting, ‘By St Patrick I’ve got the Rope over at Last.’ Behind these principals are more men, tugging at a second rope. On a green field topping a cliff behind the church-breakers is Eldon wearing a smock and guiding a plough; he turns to shout to the petitioners by the church, who will be crushed by the falling tower: ‘Look to your selves People.’ Along the horizon (left) is a Papist procession with lighted tapers, the Host, crosses, a grotesque Pope, and figures under a canopy. It approaches St. Paul’s whose dome rises above the sky-line. On the extreme right is the Monument (see British Museum satires no. 15688, &c.) in flames.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Protestant descendency [graphic] : a pull at the Church / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 19, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [19 March 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.03.19.01+

Acquired October 2018

Irish M.P.’s

Irish M.P.'s. Detailed description below.

An Irish schoolmaster-priest, sits in a chair taking a pinch of snuff from an open snuff box as he catechizes a dwarfish Irish peasant, ragged and barelegged, who answers with a sly grin: ‘O’C — for O’Connell thats right–now Pat what does MP stand for eh?’ Answer: ‘Mealy Potato’. On the table to the right is a crucifix used to prop open a book. Cf. British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Irish M.P.’s [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.112+

Acquired October 2018

Knock and ye shall enter

<img alt ... />

“An archaic iron-studded door, with posts and lintel of solid but ancient oak, represents the door of the ‘COMMONS’ [inscription on lintel]. Above: ‘”They of Rome are enter’d in our Counsels Sh.’ [‘Coriolanus’, I. ii]. An old-clothes’ man stands at the door in profile to the left gazing up at the inscription; he raises the knocker, a ring in the mouth of an angry lion’s head. He is bearded, with an ultra-Jewish profile, and has three hats piled on his own, the topmost being a flaunting feminine erection. He wears a ragged and patched gaberdine, old-fashioned buckled shoes, and carries across his shoulder a large bag, from a hole in which projects a pig’s foot (a pig in his poke). On his back is an open box of trinkets, containing watches. Close behind him stands a turbaned Turk, watching him with eager anxiety. The Jew: ‘Come I sha–Open the door vill ye–I vants to come in–and heres a shentlemans a friend of mines–vants to come in too–dont be afeard–I dont vant a sheat for nothing–I can pay for it So help me Got.’ Three men (safely inside) look down at the applicants from a small open window beside the door (right): a dissenter, holding his hat, and characterized by lank hair and plebeian features (resembling Liston as Maw-Worm, cf. British Museum Satires No. 16943); a Jesuit wearing a biretta, and putting a thumb to his nose, and a fat elderly monk; the last two frown. The left door-post (somewhat cracked) is inscribed: ‘OAK Suppose to be sound Put up 1688 only latly discovered to be full of Skakes[?peare].'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Knock and ye shall enter [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Eq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [ca. June 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.06.00.01+

Acquired October 2018

The man wot drives the sovereign

“Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect, in contrast with his rival, see British Museum Satires No. 15736.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. April 1829 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.15+

Acquired June 2017

The man wot drives the sovereign

Wellington stands full-length in profile to the left, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip in his left hand. His (gloved) right hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect. The speech-balloon above his head reads, “While I hold the Reins (your Honnor) I’ll drive against all Opposition!!!”

  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by J.L. Marks, Artillery St., Bishopsgate, London, [ca. April 1829?]

Catalog Record 

829.04.00.13

Acquired June 2017

The cad to the man wot drives the sovereign

“Peel stands directed to the left holding a dome-shaped wire cage containing rats; his left hand is on his hip. He wears a small battered hat, once a topper, a collar and stock, patched greatcoat with sheepskin collar and many pockets; loose boots to the calf. A document projects from his coat-tail pocket. Above his head: ‘I turns my hand to any thing now I ketches Rats like winking.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorHeath, William, 1795-1840.
  • TitleThe cad to the man wot drives the sovereign.
  • Published[London] : Pub. … by T. Mcfat, 26 Strawmarket [i.e. T. McLean, 26 Haymarket], April 1829.

Catalog Record

829.04.00.16+

Acquired June 2017

Soliciting a vote

“Satire on politicians; an elegant candidate removes his hat to a portly countryman who rebuffs his approach, mindful of the candidate’s vote in favour of the Roman Catholic Relief.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerNewton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker, artist.
  • TitleSoliciting a vote [graphic] / Rd. Newton del. et sc.
  • Publication[London : Pub. by T. Tegg, June 20, 1807.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

807.06.20.01+

Acquired November 2016

 

John Bulls belly and its members

lwlpr32391 (683x1024)

“John Bull, grossly obese, sits in an armchair directed to the right, smoking and holding a goblet inscribed ‘For the Belly’ in his left hand. His paunch overweights his legs; from below it projects a bunch of four big seals, shaped like mitres, two inscribed ‘Dublin’ and ‘Armagh’. These dangle against his left leg which is bare except for a tattered green cloth and rests on straw. On the other leg, which has gouty misshapen toes, are a neat stocking and shoe. From the left foot rise the words: ‘Arrah, now Mr Belly don’t be after thinking I’m satisfied–if all the rest are, Och! bother your talk, about dispersing the good things you receive sure none of them come towards me lower than your watch chain: have’nt I been neglected, Och, its withering I am–& tho’ some of your bowels yearn over me & say I might be cured, don’t part of your hard heart wish me Cut down to the bare bone–but Oh, honey if you get into a row, won’t you do better with two stout legs than only one of them–.’ John stares down towards the bare toe, which is only just in his range of vision; his words are in the cloud of smoke issuing from his pipe: ‘Never mind my poor little limb,–as to the belly Clothed in scarlet & fine lawn I smoke its selfishness, & as its head & Governor will see you righted.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Seymour, Robert, 1798-1836, printmaker.
  • TitleJohn Bulls belly and its members [graphic] / Esop fecit.
  • PublishedLondon : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, 1829.

Catalog Record

829.00.00.109

Acquired January 2015