The faith of treaties exemplified

description below

“A huge bull, snorting fire, rushes with lowered head towards a French fort (left) from which cannon-balls descend upon him. Beneath the fort sansculottes on one knee fire at the bull while standing French soldiers, correctly dressed, also fire. On the fortress stand Frenchmen, firing and waving their hats; they shout: “Vive la republic, Blood & plunder, no Quarter to John Bull!” A huge tricolour flag has a staff surmounted by a skull. To the bull’s back is strapped a bundle inscribed ‘Debt Debt’. One horn has been shot off and lies on the ground. To his left hind leg is chained a heavy weight inscribed ‘Subsidies’. Nevertheless, he cries: “Now my brave Allies let us all stand firm together & make a bold push, & I’ll be Answerable for the Event.” But behind him (right) his allies have all turned their backs and are departing in directions indicated by signposts. A fat Dutchman smoking a pipe goes ‘To Amsterdam’, saying, “I care not who beats, I’ll join the Strongest Party”. Frederick William II (father-in-law of the Duke of York) walks off ‘To Berlin’, saying, “I’ve fingerd the Cash from both Sides, & will now employ it to Secure the Partition of Poland”; “Negociate with Robertspierre privately & then – Damn Relationship!!!” Next, a Spanish don, Charles IV, goes ‘To Madrid’, saying, “Whats the Bourbon Family to me when they Impede my Interest. Hush!! I am now treating for a Separate peace with that Blackguard Roberspere to Secure my own Crown – I must enlarge the Powers of the Inquisition”. On the extreme right Francis II and Mack in a two-wheeled gig, on which is the Habsburg eagle, are driving off ‘To Vienna’. The Emperor says: “Well Mack we have made a Glorious Campaign of it; of what use are the Low Countries without they continue to fill my Coffers? As for John Bull, let him settle the business as he can he loves to be meddling”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: The faith of treaties exemplified, or, John Bulls last effort to oblige his false friends [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. July 17, 1794, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, [17 July 1794]

Catalog Record

794.07.17.01+

Acquired January 2021

A scene in the honey moon, or, Conjugal felicity

description below

“The Duke (left) and Duchess of St. Albans stand facing each other; the little Duke staggering under an ornamental basket which supports a side of bacon, inscribed Best Wiltshire. The Duchess holds on her shoulder a cutter in which are seated six oarsmen with oars held erect, and a helmsman. The Duke is dressed as Grand Falconer (see British Museum Satires No. 15596) and wears a hood with bells indicating both a fool’s cap and the hood and bells of falconry. Two speeches float from his head: [1] “In love connubial, formed to live and last, This gift records a blissful twelvemonth past We claim, then boldly claim the flitch Dunmow First of the blest, who keep the marriag Vow”. [2] I thought the flitch to small a present on this auspicious day so I have brought the Gammon with it Love. The Duchess answers: Thanks for your Bacon Duke well have you Saved it – and in return accept of this small Testimony of my affection. She wears Court dress, coronet, and feathers. The boatmen wear yellow and green liveries, and on the prow is a falcon’s head; the back of the seat in the stern is decorated with a falcon perched on a melon resting on a heap of sovereigns. In the foreground are spectators: on the left the Dukes of Cumberland (wearing his hat) and Sussex stand together with Prince Leopold behind them; on the right is Sir Francis Burdett (son-in-law of Coutts), very thin, surprised, and displeased. In the background are other spectators, their heads concealed by the boat, and on the right a group of singers, some in Tyrolean costume, with (?) Braham and Miss Stephens; they sing: a boat a boat.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A scene in the honey moon, or, Conjugal felicity [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [1828?]

Catalog Record

828.00.00.115+

Acquire June 2020

A game at chess

description below“Bonaparte (left) and Cornwallis play chess. Bonaparte, not caricatured, alert and military, wearing his large plumed cocked hat, leans forward, pointing to his move; his left arm lies on the table and in his left hand is his sheathed sabre. He says: “Check to your King, remember it is not the first time, and I think a very few Manœuvres more will completely convince you that I am better acquainted with the Game I am playing than you are aware of.” Cornwallis, plump and civilian despite his regimentals and profession, sits without a hat, scratching his head apprehensively. He says: “Curse it I shall lose this Game; You are too much for me.” He wears his ribbon and star, ‘Honi soit’ on his garter. The chairs are symbolical: that of Bonaparte has ormolu laurel wreaths, the legs are formed of fasces and axes; that of Cornwallis, with plain oval back, suggests an English drawing-room.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Author: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A game at chess [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Jany. 9th, 1802, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [9 January 1802]

Catalog Record

802.01.09.01+

Acquired September 2020

The peace soup shop

description below

“John Bull sits full face holding a bowl of soup, between Addington, the cook, and the protesting Windham on the extreme right. On the left Pitt sits in profile to the left before an enormous kitchen fire, over which hangs a giant cauldron; he blows the fire with bellows, saying, ‘I dont know how it is – but I manage this Soup business rather awkwardly – I suppose it is from being so much used to the stewing and Broiling line.’ Addington, who wears the Speaker’s wig with apron and over-sleeves, and holds a long ladle, says: ‘Though I say it that made it – you never tasted better soup in your life’. Windham (right) stands in profile to the left his knees flexed, saying, ‘O’ Mr Bull – Mr Bull – if you have any regard for your Constitution – dont touch it – the Cayen of Jacobinism flavours every spoonful – and the Fire that boil it I consider as a Funeral Pile for all your well wishes – do Johnny take some of my Cheese-parings – they are very wholesome, and easy of Digestion.’ John says, his eyes turned towards Addington, his spoon raised to his mouth: ‘I don’t mind what he says – my Hearty I say it’s very good Soup – and a d——d deal better [word erased] than your Gin. I should like a little more bread for all that, and it would be quite as well – if it did not taste so strong of the Ceylon pepper.'”British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Roberts, Piercy, active 1791-1805, printmaker.
  • Title: The peace soup shop [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etch’d by Roberts.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [ca. March 1802]

Catalog Record 

802.03.00.04+

Acquired September 2020

Britannia correcting an unruly boy

description below

“Britannia, tall and powerful, holds Napoleon across her knee, and raises a birch rod to thrash his bleeding posterior. She wears Roman draperies, with corslet and plumed helmet. The rod is tied with a ribbon inscribed: ‘United Kingdoms’. She says: “There take that and that and that, and be carefull not to provoke my Anger more.” He exclaims: “oh forgive me this time and I never will do so again, oh dear! oh dear! you’ll entirely spoil the Honors of the Sitting.” Beside Britannia (left) are her spear and sword; beside Napoleon (right) his huge cocked hat and sabre. The scene is by the sea (left), with a fleet of retreating vessels flying the tricolour flag. On the right is a cliff on which a small British lion lies on a scroll inscribed: ‘Qui uti scit ei bona’ [good things to him who knows how to use them].”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Britannia correcting an unruly boy [graphic] / T. West delt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. June 13th, 1803, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [13 June 1803]

Catalog Record

803.06.13.01+

Acquired January 2021

Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador

description below

“Napoleon (right) stands between two Russians; one (left) he strikes on the chin with his fist, saying, “There Sir take that, and tel your Master, I’ll thras every one who dares to speak to me I’ll thrash all the World D -me I’ll, I’ll I,’ll be King of the Universe.” The injured Russian stares, saying, “Why this is club Law; this is the Argument of force indeed the little Gentleman is Dêrangé.” Behind Napoleon (right) an officer in fur cloak and hussar’s cap watches with indignation, saying, “The Monarch I represent, will return this insult with becoming dignity.” On the left John Bull, jovial and grossly fat, and wearing top-boots, puts his arm across the shoulders of a pugilist, and points to Napoleon, saying, “There my Boy is an Ambassador who will treat with you in your own way, but I say be as gentle with him as you can.” The good-looking brawny pugilist, who is stripped to the waist, clenches his fists, saying, “what! is it that little Whipper snapper I am to set too with why I think the first round will settle his hash.” [An early use of this phrase which disproves Partridge, ‘Slang Dict., tracing it in England to 1825, and in U.S.A. to 1807, suggesting that the English may have learnt it in the war of 1812. It was clearly current in England by 1803] Bonaparte is small and youthful, caricatured chiefly by the disproportionate size of cocked hat and sabre.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Author: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador to the Grand Consul [graphic] / Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, London, June 16, 1803.

Catalog Record

803.06.16.02+

Acquired January 2021

Apparition du globe aerostatique de Mr. Blanchard

description belowA scene in rural France: A farmer holding onto a plow drawn by a team of oxen, shepherds with their sheep, and a man fishing in a stream, all look up in astonishment at the air balloon overhead. This print references the third flight of Jean-Pierre Blanchard, his second with American John Jeffries and the first flight over the English Channel.

 

  • Printmaker: Bonvallet, L. (Louis), approximately 1748-1818, printmaker.
  • Title: Apparition du globe aerostatique de Mr. Blanchard, entre Calais et Boulogne parti de Douvres le 7 de Janvier 1785 à 1 heure 1/2 [graphic] / dessiné par Desrais ; gravé́ par L. Bonvalet.
  • Publication: A Paris : Chez Basset rue St. Jacques au coin de celle des Mathurins, [1785]

Catalog Record

785.01.00.01+

Acquired January 2021

The frontispiece and its explanation

frontispieceA copy of the Hogarth’s Frontispiece and its explanation for Samuel Butler’s poem Hudibras with the title engraved above the image and the text below in a single sentence below. Plate one is an emblematic scene with an oval portrait of Samuel Butler mounted on a pedestal on which is carved a relief showing a satyr whipping figures of Rebellion, Hypocrisy and Ignorance dressed as puritans, while he drives a chariot drawn by Hudibras and Ralpho; in the foreground, on the left, a satyr holds up a volume of Butler’s poem as a guide for the carver (a boy dressed only in an apron), and on the right a young satyr holds up a mirror to a figure of Britannia.

 

  • Title: The frontispiece and its explanation [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed and sold by Robt. Sayer, map & printseller at No. 53 in Fleet Street, [between 1760 and 1777?]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 H67 768B

Acquired January 2021

Dramatic effect, or, The death of Genl. Duroc

description below

“The interior of a tent. Duroc, in his shirt, lies supported by a soldier on a wooden bed, while Napoleon (right) holds his right hand, turning away (to the right) and covering his face with his left hand. An officer stands solicitously beside the Emperor, supporting his left elbow. Another officer stands (left) behind the head of the low bed. On the extreme left a soldier bends over a table compounding medicaments. Duroc’s coat and sword lie on a camp-stool, beside his hat and boots. A glimpse of the distant camp is seen on the extreme right, where a Mameluke stands by the tent holding Napoleon’s horse. Duroc is addressing the Emperor, with his left arm extended. Their words are etched below the title: “Duroc, “My whole life has been consecrated to your service, nor do I regret its loss, but for the use it still might have been of to your Buonaparte, “Duroc!” there is a life to come; it is there you are going to wait for me, and where we shall one day meet again!” Duroc, “Yes Sire! but that will not be these thirty years, when you will have triumphed over your enimies [sic], and realised all the hopes of your country, I have lived an honest man: I have nothing to reproach myself with, ah! Sire! go away this sight gives you pain–Be, “Farewell then my friend”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Dramatic effect, or, The death of Genl. Duroc [graphic] : vide French Bulletin.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. June 9th, 1813, by Wm. Holland, No. 11 Cockspur Street, [9 June 1813]

Catalog Record

813.06.09.01

Acquired November 2020