Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste César André Timothée..

description below

Portrait of d’Eon, nearly half-length, in profile to the left; wearing the full military garb of a Captain of the Dragoons, including epaulets and medals; in an oval.

  • Printmaker: Le Beau, Pierre Adrien, 1748- printmaker.
  • Title: Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste César André Timothée, Déon de Beaumont, née à Tonnerre en 1728 [graphic] : a été Avocat au Parlement, Censeur Royal, Capitaine de Dragons, Chevalier de St. Louis, Ministre Plenipotentiaire de France a la Cour d’Angleterre / Desrais del. ; Le Beau sc.
  • Publication: A Paris : Chez Esnauts et Rapilly rue St. Jacques à la Ville de Coutances, A.P.D.R., [1780s?]

Catalog Record

Portraits D418 no. 1

Acquired February 2024

Summer amusement at Farmer G-‘s near Windsor

description below

“The interior of a dairy: George III (left), in shirt-sleeves, is churning; the Queen, dressed as a farmer’s wife, sits in the window counting the coins which the Princess Royal pours on to the table. The Princess has a basket on her arm and is dressed like a country-girl. The Queen says, “Bless me, Child, you have made a very bad market! Good Heavens is it possible the people can be so unreasonable these plentiful times to expect six eggs for a groat! You shall tramp to London next market day.” The King adds, “A very bad market girl, indeed, a very bad market girl – Limy shall go next” (cf. British Museum Satires No. 6947). Behind the King are shelves with bowls of cream, a furtive cat drinks from one of them. Above them, three milk-scores are chalked on the wall, headed, ‘Cartwheel’s score’, ‘The Widow Waggonrut’, and ‘Mrs Towser’. On the ground (left) is a pile of cheeses. Outside the wide doorway (right) Pitt, elegantly dressed, is milking a cow with a fastidious air; he sings: “I made war with Kate, a buxom Northern Lass: But such my cruel fate – ” Thurlow, wearing a smock, stands with his back to Pitt, cracking a whip; he says, “She bid you kiss her A——! Damn the Whip I’ll never learn the right smack of a Carter.””–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Newton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker.
  • Title: Summer amusement at Farmer G-‘s near Windsor [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. August 9, 1791, by W. Holland, No. 50 Oxford Street, [9 August 1791]

Catalog Record

791.08.09.01+

Acquired September 2023

Diamond cut diamond, or, A whimsical information

description below

“The Lord Mayor sits (right) in profile to the left in a chair of state facing a city officer in a long gown holding a wand who leads in a file of five amused ‘cits’, three men and two women. The officer says: “Here are a number of People brought before your Honor, by your Honor’s Order, for not keeping the pavement clean before their Houses in Frosty Weather – according to the Act of Parliament for that purpose; but the worst of all is – here is a Worthy Alderman, lays information, that the pavement before your Honor’s Door is as much neglected as any of the rest – and moreover says that he himself had a fall there in the late Frost, which shook him so much, that he has been unable to digest Turtle or Venison ever since – A material injury to one of the Body Corporate.” The alderman, who heads the file, clasps an enormous paunch. The Mayor answers, proffering a coin: “Well, Well, if that is the case, take my five Shillings, and say no more about the Business.” The Mayor wears spectacles and a chain of office; he has not the plebeian appearance of the alderman and his companions. (Charles Price was Lord Mayor 1802-3.)”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Roberts, P. (Piercy), active 1785-1824, printmaker, publisher.
  • Title: Diamond cut diamond, or, A whimsical information [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etch’d by Roberts.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by P. Roberts, 28 Middle Row, Holborn, [1803?]

Catalog Record

803.00.00.53+

Acquired February 2024

Peepers in Bond Street, or, The cause of the lounge!!

description below

“Two pretty women leave a shop (left) to enter a coach whose back is towards the spectator. The foremost (? Duchess of Rutland), raising her petticoats high, puts a foot on the step. She is followed by (?) Lady Jersey, who crosses a step laid across a barred area or cellar, also raising her petticoats. A little girl (left) stands in the doorway. The legs of the ladies are eagerly inspected by male loungers. One man crouches at the back of the coach to peep through a quizzing-glass. The roadway on the right of the coach is crowded. Men with telescopes are indicated in the windows of the houses (right). Other spectators stand in the cellar or area looking upwards through the bars. The cover of a coal-hole in the pavement is pushed aside to show a profile. …”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1764-1811, printmaker.
  • Title: Peepers in Bond Street, or, The cause of the lounge!! [graphic] / I.C.
  • Publication: London : Pub. April 17st [sic], 1793, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly …, [17 April 1793]

Catalog Record

793.04.17.01+

Acquired December 2023

The coronation of the Empress of the Nairs

description below

Lady Hertford reclines in an ornate bath, into which water gushes from the jaws of a monster which decorates the pedestal of a Venus. The bath is raised on a triple dais and backed by the pillars and canopy which frame the Venus forming the centre of the design. The Regent, in royal robes, ascends the steps of the dais, poised on his toes like a ballet-dancer, and places a crownlike marquis’s coronet on the head of Lady Hertford who leans towards him, her enormous breasts appearing over the edge of the bath. She says: “I proclaim the Freedom of the Sex & the Supremacy of Love.” Lord Hertford, who bestrides the pedestal, looks down delightedly from behind the statue of Venus. He has horns, and holds his Chamberlain’s staff. The water pours from the bath through the nostrils of a bull’s head with which it is ornamented, and falls in a triple cascade into a circular basin in the centre foreground. On each side of the statue of Venus and flanking the dais is a statue in a niche: ‘Aspasia’ (left) and ‘Messalina’ (right); both are disrobing. Near the fountain (right) a hideous hag, naked to the waist, crouches before a tall brazier in which she burns a ‘Mantle of Modesty’. The building appears to be circular, an arc of the wall forming a background on each side of the centre-piece. On this are tablets inscribed respectively ‘Hic Jacet Perdita’ [Mary Robinson, the Prince’s first mistress, see No. 5767, &c.]; ‘Hic Jacet Armstead’ [Mrs. Fox, who had been the Prince’s mistress, cf. No. 10589]; ‘Hic J[acet] Vauxhall Bess’ [Elizabeth Billington, see British Museum Satires No. 9970; her mother sang at Vauxhall, see British Museum Satires No. 6853]. In the foreground on the extreme right a buxom young woman puts her arms round the Duke of Cumberland, saying, “I’ll go to Cumberland”; he walks off with her, to the fury of an admiral just behind the lady who clutches his sword and is seemingly her husband. Cumberland wears hussar uniform with a shako and fur-bordered dolman, with a star and a large sabre. A meretricious-looking young woman (? Mrs. Carey) puts her arms round the Duke of York, saying, “And I to York.” The Duke, who wears uniform with a cocked hat and no sword, looks down quizzically at her. Behind him a tall thin officer in hussar uniform bends towards Princess Charlotte, taking her hand; he says: “Sure & I’ll go to Wales.” She runs eagerly towards him. As a pendant to these figures, Grenadiers stand at attention on the left, holding bayoneted muskets; they have huge noses, and smile at a buxom lady wearing spurred boots who addresses them with outstretched arm, saying, “And you for Buckinghamshire.” At her feet is an open book: ‘Slawkenberges Chapr on Noses’ [from Sterne’s Slawkenbergius, imaginary author of a Rabelaisian fantasy in ‘Tristram Shandy’]. They have a standard with the word ‘Buckin …’ on it. Behind the Prince (left) stands Tom Moore, looking up at the coronation; he holds an open book: ‘Little Poems / Ballad . . .’ He says: “I’ll give you one Little Song More [see British Museum Satires No. 12082].” Behind him stands Mrs. Jordan, placing a chamber-pot on the head of the Duke of Clarence, who wears admiral’s uniform with trousers.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: The coronation of the Empress of the Nairs [graphic] / G. Cruikshank sculpt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. September 1st, 1812, by W.N. Jones, No. 5 Newgate St., [1 September 1812]

Catalog Record

812.09.01.01++

Acquired September 2023

Refreshment at St. James’s

description below

Elegant and affluent customers enjoy ices in a grand room in London’s fashionable St. James’s. The female server behind the counter is elegantly dressed and looks with ease out of the window. A finely dressed gentleman leans against the counter at right, spooning ice cream into his mouth from a glass he holds in his left hand; his hat, gloves, and stick are carefully arranged on a chair next him. Two women are seated at the left side of the counter, one holding an ice cream glass and spoon. A classical fireplace on the right has additional glasses arranged upon it. A great craze in 18th-century Britain, amongst the wealthy, was ice cream. Establishments such as The Pineapple on Berkeley Square (close by St James’s), owned by Domenico Negri, offered “All Sorts of Ice, Fruits & Creams” (see the elaborate trade card in the British Museum). This print was intended as a companion piece to “Refreshment at St. Giles’s” which, in contrast, shows two women and a man being served gin by a female proprietor from a makeshift and run-down bar.

  • Printmaker: Stubbs, George Townly, -1815?, printmaker.
  • Title: Refreshment at St. James’s [graphic] / Chas. Ansell delt. ; Geo. Townly Stubbs sculpt.
  • Publication: [London] : [G.T. Stubbs], [approximately June 1789]

Catalog Record

789.06.00.01+

Acquired September 2023

New drop scene, or, A managerial puff!!

description below

A man stands in a room holding a caduceus decorated comic mask, saying ”When I do stare, see how the subjects quacke’.” He is surrounded with bills and a bag of coins on the table, both suggesting corruption. At sign hanging from the table reads “Alexandrian Memorial, A loss is no benefit. No committee.” Below on the floor, another discarded scroll reads “Rejected with prejudice.” At his foot is an animal (a fox?) holding a sign “Designs [ca]refully copied, civilly returned, and he carries in his hand a piece of paper “I perceive the trick & will avoid the cheat. Na-th.” Behind him hangs a sign, “The exact-u-trick is safe or 22d Sept.” On the wall is a picture of the facade of a theater. Probably a satire on an unidentified theater manager.

  • Title: New drop scene, or, A managerial puff!! – Cunning Isaac! [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [approximately 1810?]

Catalog Record

810.00.00.85

Acquired September 2023

The OP spectacles

description below

“The full face of Clifford, based on a fashionably swathed neck-cloth and high coat-collar, fills the design. The mouth is open as if shouting. The eyes and part of the cheeks are covered by circles representing huge spectacles. Each contains a symmetrical view of Covent Garden Theatre seen from the stage, showing pit, three tiers of boxes, and the centre of the two galleries (the ‘pigeon-holes’ not appearing), all crowded. The views differ only in the performers on the stage, two actors on the right (one clearly Kemble, probably as Macbeth), and on the left two actors and a file of soldiers. Superimposed on the middle of each circular design is a large ‘O’ (left) and ‘P’ (right). Round the broad rims of the spectacles: (left) ‘Old House Old Prices & No Private Boxes’ and (right) ‘Old House Old Prices & No Pigeon Holes’. On the bridge across the nose: ‘N.P.B.’ (No Private Boxes, see British Museum Satires No. 11421).”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1764-1811, printmaker.
  • Title: The OP spectacles [graphic] / Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by T. Tegg, 111 Cheapside, Novr. 17, 1809.

Catalog Record

809.11.17.01

Acquired December 2023

The city sheep shearing

description below

“Three men shear four rams with human faces and long spiral horns. The first (left), still unshorn, has the bottle-nose and drink-blotched face of Curtis; a large bell hangs from his neck; he bleats B A A A A A A. His shearer says: Come along you Blubber–alias Bell Weather S’Blood what a Cur ’tis; in his pocket is a paper: Quintus Curtius. He is Quin, who took an active part against Flower. The second, Councillor Waithman (a draper), holds Flower, the Mayor, labelled The Flower of the Flock, who is almost shaved; he says: Egad I have Cut them preelly [sic] close; his shears, like those of Quin, are inscribed Vox Popula [sic]. The third, Alderman Harvey Combe, uses a comb. He holds Alderman Price and says to Waithman: Ne’er Wait man I have Combed them well–. Price says: N’o Blubber Sperm fetches the best Price. Beside him is another ram (Shaw), completely shorn and dejected; it says: Pshaw I can never Stand upright in the presence of a great Mon but always Keep Booing, booing [cf. British Museum Satires No. 11306].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1764-1811, printmaker.
  • Title: The city sheep shearing [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, April 12th, 1809.

Catalog Record

809.04.12.01

Acquired September 2023

The Catholic sovereign safety-coach

description below

“Apparently an imitation (better drawn) of British Museum Satires No. 15716. Wellington drives (left to right) four galloping horses, each with a human head. The leaders are Lyndhurst (piebald) and Scarlett (black), both wearing legal wigs; the wheelers Brougham, also in his wig, and Burdett. He flicks his lash over the leaders, saying, ‘Kim up Motley–keep together odd Rat [Lyndhurst] ye–or I’ll lay it into ye!!’ The King’s (pleased) face is seen through the coach window; he says: ‘I say Arthur, you are the Man Wot can make’m go, if you like!!’ The guard is Lady Conyngham: she stands up, blowing her horn. She wears a guard’s greatcoat and satchel over her dress and holds a blunderbuss. The coach is the ‘Windsor Castle’; ‘Wellington & Co.’; ‘G R 1829’. It has just passed and overturned a two-wheeled ass-cart, the ass falling on its head, the driver, Eldon, sprawling on the ground. In the cart, which is inscribed ‘John Eldon Rubbish Carter’ [see British Museum Satires No. 15700, &c], are big bundles of ‘Anti-Catholic Petetions’ [see British Museum Satires No. 15661, &c.]. Standing behind and below the guard’s dickey is Peel as ‘cad’, or conductor; he thumbs his nose at Eldon, saying, ‘There’s a Guard for the Sovereign eh!!!’ Windsor Castle is on the extreme left; on the extreme right is a signpost pointing (left) to ‘Windsor’ and (right) ‘To London’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The Catholic sovereign safety-coach [graphic] : a new start from the castle Windsor – a regular out and outer / T.J. fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [April? 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.19+

Acquired September 2023