An eclipse

description below

“The irradiated head of George IV in profile to the left, is almost covered by the darkly shaded head of Wellington, which is almost full-face, but glaring to the right with fierce yet apprehensive melancholy. From this darkened mask slants down and to the right a broadening shadow which passes across a terrestrial globe at the base of the design, covering an island inscribed ‘England’, but leaving ‘Ireland’ (right) unobscured. The rays from the King’s head, only a few of which are covered by the shadow, extend to the margins and illuminate the edge of a border of dark cloud.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Phillips, John, active 1825-1831, printmaker.
  • Title: An eclipse [graphic] : lately discoverd in the Georgium Sidus, and quite unexpected by any of the astronomers / A. Sharpshooter fec.
  • Publication: London : Pub. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, 1829.

Catalog Record

829.06.00.02+

Acquired November 2020

The old proprietors advice

description below

“Prince Leopold (right), in uniform, puts his head through a glassless aperture in a window in the door of his ‘Grecian Establish[ment]–Co[burg]’, to look intently at a fat Turk who stands in profile to the right, elaborately dressed and holding a long pipe with smoking bowl. The door, partly cut off by the right margin, is flanked by a Corinthian pillar and set in a wall on which are placards: ‘This . Shop!!! will shortly open under entire new Management–Vivant [sic] Rex’; a Union Jack poster (partly covered); the Russian eagle, and a fleur-de-lis, the two last inscribed ‘Loan’. The Turk: ‘What have you taken the Shop? well if you take my advice you will not give Your Customers too much Credit for I can tell you they are a queer set to deal with by the bye they nearly ruined me–and mind that you look sharp after your Shopmen’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The old proprietors advice [graphic] / William Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. April 10, 1830, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [10 April 1830]

Catalog Record

830.04.10.01+

Acquired November 2020

A comfortable thing to be king of Greece

description below

“Prince Leopold sits enthroned, flanked by his new subjects; he wears uniform with a crown, and sits on a two-tiered circular dais in a chair of state, the seat of which is covered with giant thorns. Punctured and frightened, he grasps the arms of his chair with crisped fingers; his toes are drawn back, touching the ground, and he looks towards a savage-looking Greek (right) who kneels before him with a long knife held behind his back. A similar ruffian kneels on the left; others approach menacingly from the left, one smoking a long pipe and grasping a knife. They wear Greek costume with embroidered jackets and full white breeches. On the right are long-robed ecclesiastics, headed by a bearded patriarch with a cross in one hand, a knife in the other.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A comfortable thing to be king of Greece [graphic] / W. Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 6, 1830 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [6 March 1830]

Catalog Record

830.03.06.01+

Acquired November 2020

The head ranger and his fallow deer

description below

“George IV, dressed as a sportsman, in a broad-brimmed hat, jacket with many pockets, and gaiters above the knee, walks in Windsor Park beside a deer with a woman’s head and wearing a collar inscribed ‘Chester’. He puts his arm round her neck, and says, staring at her amorously, ‘”I’ll build you my Dear [altered to] deer a neat Cottage close by, | Where We can retreat unobserved, on the sly, | So be not afraid of the old Cunning Doe, | Whose stale selfish Tricks are become quite So-so.’ They are under a tree; bushes screen them from the Cottage (left), just below Windsor Castle on its steep hill.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Jones, Thomas Howell, active 1823-1848, printmaker.
  • Title: The head ranger and his fallow deer [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. 1829 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [1829]

Catalog Record

829.00.00.114+

Acquired November 2020

A general view of the city of Oxford

description below

A view of the city of Oxford from a distance with a horse and cows grazing in the foreground on either side of a stream. In middle distance there is a large manor with outbuildings.

  • Printmaker: Green, John, active 1746-1776, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: A general view of the city of Oxford [graphic] = Vue générale de la ville d’Oxford / I. Green delin. et sculp.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, map & printseller, at No. 53 in Fleet Street, as the act directs, 10 August 1773.

Catalog Record

773.08.10.02+

Acquired May 2021

A general view of the city of Oxford

view of the city of Oxford

A view of the city of Oxford from a distance with a horse and cows grazing in the foreground on either side of a stream. In middle distance there is a large manor with outbuildings

  • Printmaker: Green, John, active 1746-1776, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: A general view of the city of Oxford [graphic] = Vue générale de la ville d’Oxford / I. Green delin. et sculp.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Robt. Sayer, map & printseller, at No. 53 in Fleet Street, as the act directs, 10 August 1773.

Catalog Record

773.08.10.02+

Acquired May 2021

A Christmas box

description below

“A front elevation of a theatre-box crammed with delighted children fills the design. In the front row are a lady and four little girls. In the middle sits the father, one small boy on his knee, an arm round another child. Eight more children fill the box. Behind them a lady chooses fruit from an old woman’s basket. Two men stand behind. Over the front of the box hangs a playbill: During the Xmas Holidays–Pantomime of Harliquin–Clown by Mr G [Grimaldi].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: A Christmas box [graphic] / S.K. invt. ; G. Ck. fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Decr. 26th, 1826, by S. Knights, Sweetings [A]lley, Royal Exchange, [26 December 1826]

Catalog Record

826.12.26.01

Acquired November 2020

The triumph of truth, or, The ghost of Diogenes

description below

“Diogenes stands in the House of Commons between the two front benches; both arms are thrown out towards Burdett with a dramatic gesture; in one hand is his lantern, illuminating the patriot at close range; small clouds at his feet indicate that he is a ghost. He turns his head to look steadily at three members on the front Ministerial bench (left), saying: “An Honest Man is the noblest work of God” [Pope, ‘Essay on Man’, quoted by Burns, cf. British Museum Satires No. 11562]. The three culprits (unrecognizable) register shame and terror, their hair standing on end. Burdett stands by the front bench (right) on which is his hat, displaying to the frightened Ministers (one intended for Perceval) a document headed ‘Magna Charta–Pro Rege, lege, grege’ [see British Museum Satires No. 11547]. Except for one member on the front bench, those behind Burdett stand, five being depicted, three of whom wave their hats. All the occupants of the gallery wave still more emphatically. In the background and on the left is the Speaker’s Chair; the diminutive Abbot, author of the famous Warrant, see British Museum Satires No. 11545, &c., holds up a hand in astonished alarm. Burdett was in the Tower during May, see British Museum Satires No. 11558. ‘Hair on end’ is an allusion to Lethbridge, see British Museum Satires No. 11538.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The triumph of truth, or, The ghost of Diogenes, more hair on end [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. May 1810 by T. Tegg, 111 Cheapside, [May 1810]

Catalog Record

810.05.00.01+

Acquired March 2021

A phantasmagoria, or, A review of old times

see description below

“A magician stands full face with uplifted sabre held over the heads of two figures from the past whom he has called up, and who stand within a magic circle. He displays them to their modern descendants, a tall stout Frenchman plainly dressed, wearing cocked hat and military boots, who stands with his arm on the shoulder of a thin, wretched, shambling, Englishman, small, ugly, and foppish, his hand thrust through an empty pocket. The magician has a beard, but features, cocked hat, consular dress, and sabre indicate Napoleon. He asks: “Are you satisfied Gentlemen?” The apparitions (left) are a grossly obese Englishman in old-fashioned dress, a cane hanging from his right wrist, and an ugly, tall, cadaverous, and foppish Frenchman holding a snuffbox. They say, respectively: “Is that my Grandson Jack? what a skeleton!!!”; “Ah mon Cousin, vat you eat de Beef & Plum Pudding!!” Their surprised successors exclaim: “Bless me! why I am a mere Stump of a man to him!!! and viable my Cousin look like de Frog & John Bull look like de Ox but Grace a Dieu times are Changed!!” Beside the magician are symbols of his art: a globe, a crocodile, a scroll, a skull. Within the circle and beside the French apparition is a frog.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: A phantasmagoria, or, A review of old times [graphic] / I. Ck.
  • Publication: London : Pub. by T. Williamson, N. 20 Strand, London, March 9th, 1803.

Catalog Record

803.03.09.01+

Acquired March 2021

Views of London

description below

A writing sheet, illustrated with ten views of London that border a central blank area.

  • Title: Views of London [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published April 4, 1814, by R. Harrild, 20 Great Eastcheap, [4 April 1814]

Catalog Record

814.04.04.01+

Acquired December 2020