A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having Scratched out of the Club’), or retire, having already done so. Fox and Sheridan wear enormous wigs, the former says, “Brother: Brother: we are all in the wrong” (showing that they are Peachum and Lockit [Like Newcastle and Fox in 1756 (British Museum Satires no. 3371), Burke and Sheridan in 1790 (British Museum Satires no. 7627), Burke and Fox in 1791 (British Museum Satires no. 7856).] in Gay’s ‘Beggar’s Opera’, II. ii). Before Fox is a list with names scored through. Sheridan grasps a bottle of ‘Sherry’. A couple advance together, in the act of hurling their large wigs at the pile; one says, “I will Scratch out my Name in hopes of getting in for the City” (probably Nathaniel Newnham, returned for the City 1784, but defeated in 1790, cf. British Museum Satires no. 7162). The other is perhaps Windham. The only one of the retiring wigless Whigs who is characterized is Burke. All say: “We have erased our Names for ever from the Club, when the Artful & Ambitious designs of a Faction are carried on under a Mask of Prudential Reform & when the leading Members are Notoriously known to Carry on a secret Correspondence with the Avowed Enemies of the Constitution they Affect to Support & Defend it is high time for all prudent & real friends to that Constitution to leave them to their Just Punishment, the Contemp of all true Friends to their King and Constitution.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleA scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern, or, A crack in the Wig Club [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. March 17, 1793, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly … , [17 March 1793]

Catalog Record 

793.03.17.01

Acquired June 2018

The man wot drives the sovereign

A satire on the Duke’s pressure on the King to accept Emancipation. Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect.

  • PrintmakerPhillips, John, fl. 1825-1831, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by E. King, Chancery-lane, April 1829.

Catalog Record

829.04.00.14+

Acquired June 2017

The man wot drives the sovereign

“Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect, in contrast with his rival, see British Museum Satires No. 15736.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. April 1829 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.15+

Acquired June 2017

The party wot drives the sovereign

Queen Adelaide, side-saddle on a horse with a man’s face, Lord Grey, using spurs and a riding crop to press him into the ‘Slough of Despond’, joining other politicians including Wellington. Grey says, ” Don’t drive so hard; you will worry me to death.” A signpost ‘To Reform’ points the other way. A group behind her cry, “Go it, Addy, push him on, don’t let him make any, without he first makes us.”

  • Creator: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, lithographer.
  • TitleThe party wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / HH [monogram].
  • Publication[London] : Published by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, 1832.

Catalog Record

832.00.00.49+

Acquired June 2017

The cad to the man wot drives the sovereign

“Peel stands directed to the left holding a dome-shaped wire cage containing rats; his left hand is on his hip. He wears a small battered hat, once a topper, a collar and stock, patched greatcoat with sheepskin collar and many pockets; loose boots to the calf. A document projects from his coat-tail pocket. Above his head: ‘I turns my hand to any thing now I ketches Rats like winking.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorHeath, William, 1795-1840.
  • TitleThe cad to the man wot drives the sovereign.
  • Published[London] : Pub. … by T. Mcfat, 26 Strawmarket [i.e. T. McLean, 26 Haymarket], April 1829.

Catalog Record

829.04.00.16+

Acquired June 2017

Boroughmongers’ attack on the British column

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The opponents of parliamentary reform, including Wellington and Peel, attempt to pull down a column topped by Lord John Russell, a portrait of William IV on the plinth. The “Explanation of the engraving”: This spirited sketch was originally designed by George Cruikshank. Esq., of Pentouville, London. The column in the centre is dedicated to the “King and Constitution,” on the base of which is a portrait of his present Majesty, William IV. On the top of the columnn [sic] stands Lord John Russell, holding in his hand the Mirror of Truth. On the left of the pillar the Duke of Wellington, Sir R. Peel, and others are attempting with cords, axes, &c. to overturn the column; while on on [sic] the right, Lord Chancellor Brougham and Earl Grey stand in a calm and dignfied position, smiling at the futile attempts of the Boroughmongers to overturn the People’s Rights. On the same side Lord Althorp is seen bearing a banner, representing the future prosperity of England, and the Attorney General (Sir Thomas Denman) is supporting the Flag of Victory.

  • TitleBoroughmongers’ attack on the British column [graphic].
  • Publication[Birmingham, England : Printed by R. Heppel, 113 Coleshill-Street, Birmingham …, ca. 1830]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

830.00.00.159++

Acquired July 2016

Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians

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The citizens of Alexandria, Virginia, are ridiculed in this scene for their lack of serious resistance against the British seizure of the city in 1814. At left two frightened gentlemen kneel with hands folded, pleading, “Pray Mr. Bull don’t be too hard with us — You know we were always friendly, even in the time of our Embargo!” In the center stands a bull in English seaman’s clothes, holding out a long list of “Terms of Capitulation” to the Alexandrians. He says, “I must have all your Flour — All your Tobacco — All your Provisions — All your Ships — All your Merchandize — every thing except your Porter and Perry — keep them out of my sight, I’ve had enough of them already.” His allusion is to American Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry and Captain David Porter. At right, a soldier and sailor carry off spirits, saying: “Push on Jack, the yankeys are not all so Cowardly as these Fellows here — let’s make the best of our time.” and “Huzza boys!!! More Rum more Tobacco!” American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1814-3

  • PrintmakerCharles, William, 1776-1820, artist, publisher.
  • TitleJohnny Bull and the Alexandrians [graphic] / Wm. Charles sc.
  • PublishedPhila. [Philadelphia] : Pubd. and sold wholesale by Wm. Charles, [ca. 21 October 1814]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

814.10.21.01+

Acquired November 2015

A great stream from a petty fountain

Click for larger image

A torrent of taxes gushes from the mouth of Lord Henry Petty, chancellor of the exchequer, emptying into the “Unfathomable Sea of Taxation” in which John Bull is drowning in full view of greedy cormorants representing members of the Grenville ministry which was formed after the death of William Pitt.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, fl. 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A great stream from a petty fountain, or, John Bull swamped in the flood of new-taxes [graphic] : cormorants fishing in the stream.
  • Published: [London : Pubd. May 1806, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, 1806].

Catalog Record  & Digital Collection

806.05.00.09+

Acquired December 2004

Publick credit

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE: Publick credit

Public credit is depicted as a vigorous young gentleman, nobly-dressed in a Senator’s gown, holding a merchant’s account book whose cover is printed with the motto “solutus omni faenore” signifying true credit free from interest. The griffin below signifies safe custody. In the background figures representing Popery, Rebellion, and Slander, all of which seem to threaten Publick Credit are thwarted as is the fox, an emblem of cunning and deceit. Both the text below describing the image and the image above are enclosed in two separate scroll-formed frames; in the center of the scroll at the top is a mask and a dagger. Probably a response to Robert Walpole’s Some considerations concerning the publick funds.

  • Artist: Bickham, George, 1706?-1771.
  • Title: Publick credit [graphic] / G. Bickham invt. et sculp.
  • Published: [London : G. Bickham], May’s Buildings, Covent Garden, October [ the] 18, 1745.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Acquired October 2011.