Hudibras vanquish’d and protected by Trulla

see description below

A copy (cropped) of Hogarth’s fifth plate: Hudibras is sprawled on the ground with Trulla, a large country-woman, astride him fending off angry villagers, including a cobbler and a butcher who are wielding clubs; to the left, Ralpho is flanked by a man with a rope (mostly cropped from this image) and another who holds a sword.

  • Title: Hudibras vanquish’d and protected by Trulla [graphic] : P. 1. Cant: 3. l. 929.
  • Publication: [London] : [Robert Sayer], [between 1768 and 1794]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 H67 768B

Acquired January 2021

Morning

description below

An old woman, the prude, is standing near a crowd of people huddled around a bonfire in Covent Garden. She is crossing Covent Garden Piazza, disapproving of the amorous scenes outside the notorious Tom King’s Coffee House. The print shows the morning and is part of a series representing the progress of the day.

  • Printmaker: Cook, Thomas, approximately 1744-1818, printmaker.
  • Title: Morning [graphic] / designed by Wm. Hogarth ; engraved by T. Cook.
  • Publication: [London] : Published August the 1st, 1797, by G.G. & J. Robinson, Pater-noster Row, London, [1 August 1797]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 797.08.01.01++ Box 310

Acquired January 2021

He and his drunken companions raise a riot in Covent Garden

description below

“Plate from a pirated series of Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress, not based on one of the original prints: Covent Garden with St Paul’s church and the buildings at the north-western corner of the piazza; the Rake (here called Ramble) and drunken friends are accosting women passers-by and the watch has arrived to set about them with staves.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Bowles, Thomas, II, active 1712-1767, printmaker.
  • Title: He and his drunken companions raise a riot in Covent Garden [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [John Bowles], [1735]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 735.00.00.19+

Acquired January 2021

Noon

description below

A copy of the second print in William Hogarth’s series “Four Times of the Day”: Set outside St Giles’s-in-the-Fields. On the right an elegant crowd leaves the French Huguenot church; they are dressed in the height of French fashion. Two women kiss on the far right in the customary French way. They are contrasted with Londoners on the left. The two groups are separated by a gutter down the middle of the road; a dead cat lies in the gutter foreground. The Londoners stand outside a tavern with the sign of the Good Woman (one without a head); a woman and man in the second-storey window look surprised as the contents of her bowl are tossed out the window. In the foreground, left, under a sign with John the Baptist’s head on a platter and reading “Good Eating”, a black man embraces a servant girl and a small boy (evidently intended by his curly red hair to be identified as one of the Irish inhabitants of the area) cries because he has broken a pie-dish. A little girl squats as she eats the fallen pie off the ground. The clock in the steeple in the background reads 12:30.

  • Printmaker: Cook, Thomas, approximately 1744-1818, printmaker.
  • Title: Noon [graphic] / designed by Wm. Hogarth ; engraved by T. Cook.
  • Publication: [London] : Published October the 1st, 1797, by G.G. & J. Robinson, Pater-noster Row, London, [1 October 1797]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 797.10.01.03++ Box 310

Acquired January 2021

Die Entdeckung

description below

A German copy of Hogarth’s “The Discovery” (1743?): a scene in a bedoom where four gentlemen stand beside a curtained bed in which a black woman reclines; she reaches out to touch the chin of one of the men who has evidently just pulled back the curtain. The scene is thought to record a practical joke carried out on the lothario John Highmore by his friends: having arranged an assignation with an attractive young woman, they replaced her with a black prostitute. When he discovered the swap, on climbing into bed, they appeared from hiding. See Paulson.

  • Printmaker: Heintz, C. F., printmaker.
  • Title: Die Entdeckung [graphic] / lith. v. C. F. Heintz.
  • Publication: [Germany?] : [publisher not identified], [between 1833 and 1836]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 830.00.00.01 Box 140

Acquired January 2021

No effect

description below

A young gentlemen sits in a chair opposite three fashionable young ladies and their mother who are seated on a sofa. His wide grin suggests that he has amused himself with an anecdote, but the expressions on the ladies’ faces indcate that he has failed to amuse them. One of the young ladies looks down at the dog in her lap, another looks at her fan.

  • Title: No effect [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sepr. 1823 by J. Dickinson [illegible], [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.01

Acquired June 2020

Portrait of a woman in a large hat

description below

A portrait of a woman in the rondel frame; in profile, head and shoulders only, looking down and to the right, wearing an extravagant hat; possibly a performer.

 

  • Printmaker: Laurie, Robert, 1755-1836, printmaker.
  • Title: [Portrait of a woman in a large hat] [graphic] / Robt. Dighton pinxit ; R. Laurie fecit.
  • Publication: London : Printed for R. Sayer & J. Bennett, No. 53 Fleet Street, 26 Feby. 1778, as the act directs.

Catalog Record

778.02.26.01

Acquired May 2020

Hints towards a change of ministry

“Ten ladies, arranged in two rows, with numbers referring to notes etched beneath the design, their proposed offices etched above their heads. … ‘(1) First Lady of the Treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer.’ The ‘Duc – ss of Gor-n’ (Pitt’s friend), wearing a tartan drapery, sits at a writing-table. Facing her, with outstretched right arm, is ‘(2) President of the Council and Duc-ss of Ric-nd.’ ‘(3) Lady High Chancellor is the Coun-ss of Buc-s-e’, very short and fat, in wig and gown and holding the purse of the Great Seal. Facing her is ‘(4) Chamberlain’, who is ‘Margr-ne of Ans-h’, wearing a coronet and feathers, and holding a long wand of office. ‘(5) Mistress of the Horse’ holding a whip is ‘Lady Arc-r.’ ‘(6) First Lady of the Admiralty’ is ‘Mrs Jo-n’, with her arms folded, in profile to the right, as if playing the part of Priscilla Hoyden in ‘The Romp’, see British Museum Satires No. 6875, but wearing a naval cocked hat, emblem of her liaison with the Duke of Clarence, see British Museum Satires No. 9009. Facing her is ‘(7) Secretary of War & Capn of the Guards, La-y Wa-ce’ (sister of No. 1); she wears a military cocked hat and coat with epaulettes, her hands placed truculently on her hips. (Her friendship with Dumouriez is perhaps hinted at.) ‘(8) Mistress of the Buck Hounds’, is ‘March-ss of Sa-ry’, thin and weatherbeaten, holding two hounds on a leash, ‘(9) Ranger of Hyde Park’, is ‘La-y La-e’ (wife of Sir John Lade) wearing a riding-habit and holding a riding-switch. ‘(10) Post Mistress General and Inspector of Mis-sent Letters’ is ‘La-y Je-y’. She sits at a round table on which are many letters and appliances for opening and re-sealing them, including a spirit-lamp inscribed ‘Hot water’. She holds a lighted candle and peers through spectacles at a sealed letter.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Hints towards a change of ministry [graphic] : respectfully submitted to the consideration of the ladies of Great Britain.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Febry. 1st, 1797, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, corner of Sackville St. …, [1 February 1797]

Catalog Record 

797.02.01.02+

Acquired October 2019

 

A Welch peasantry

title page. Additional description below

A series of ten prints showing the Welsh men, women and children in a variety of settings, mostly in rural landscapes with trees and wooden fences.

  • Author: Taylor, T. (Thomas), active 1804.
  • Title: A Welch peasantry / sketched from life by T. Taylor.
  • Published: [London] : Pubd. May 1, 1804, by Laurie & Whittle, 53, Fleet Street, London, [1 May 1804]

Catalog Record 

724 804T

Acquired September 2018