The restive Pegasus, or, The dramatic author foiled

description below

pencil sketch of a man on a horse
“A man in ragged but quasi-fashionable dress rides (right to left) an ass through a river which flows past a steep mountain. The animal jibs, with ears set back; the rider raises a whip in each hand. He wears, and uses, three pairs of spurs, and attached to his shoulders and to the ass is a monstrous pile of bladders inscribed respectively ‘Repartee’, ‘Nonsensical Verses’, ‘Catastrophe’, ‘Sentiment’, ‘Blasphemies’, ‘Puns’, ‘Duels’, ‘Double Entendres’, ‘Metaphors’, ‘Ghosts’, ‘Melting Speeches’, ‘Squibs’, ‘Dialogue’, ‘Daggers Poisons’.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the print engraved after this drawing.
A rough pencil sketch of the same design but lacking much of the detail on the verso.
  • Creator: Grinagain, Giles, artist.
  • Title: The restive Pegasus, or, The dramatic author foiled in his endeavor to ascend Parnassus [art original].
  • Production: [England], [1802]

Catalog Record

Drawings G867 no. 1 Box D205

Acquired September 2023

A buz in a box, or, The poet in a pet

description below

“A corner of the stage at Drury Lane slants diagonally from left to right, showing part of the orchestra and pit (right) with part of two stage-boxes on the extreme right. The stage manager, Raymond, stands addressing the clamorous audience, while on the left a young man with ass’s ears sits on a donkey which flourishes its heels so that they strike the lowered stage-curtain. The donkey brays “Ih ho Ih ho Ih ho,” its hind-quarter is branded ‘My Pegasus Buz’. Its rider recites: “Nor ever here your smiles would be represt, “Knew you the rival flames that fires our breast, “Flame, Fire and Flame!–sad–woe Neddy! Ladies and Gentlemen, My Papa’s Pegasus is so full of fire and spirit that very few are capable of mounting him. for my self I never spoke but once & that was– Unce logos but if you will give me leave to get on with my Papas Monologue I am positive you will pronounce it the prettiest piece of poetry produced for the purpose.” Raymond says: “Ladies and Gentlemen, it was never the intention of the Proprietors to introduce Assess [sic] on these boards but as you seem entertained with their braying if it [is] your wish, we will procure some trainers from the other House as we are really ignorant in the management of thes [sic] Animals.” Greeted by derisive cheers from the audience, Dr. Busby, also with ass’s ears, leans from the upper stage-box, saying, “Ladies and Gentlemen, only hear My Son speak my Monologue written by myself the only one fit to be heard the committee are as ignorant of good Poetry a[s] I am of true criticism. I am a great writer reviews my sons works very clever indeed–writes my own life–well worth reading–my Life of Lucius Otrigger will astonish you now pray hear my Son speak my Monologue!–.” A man behind him shouts: “Bravo! Go on! Go, on,” and one in the crowded lower box applauds: “Bravo Apollo go on Go . . .” In the foreground a man in the pit shouts pointing to the ass: “Why don’t you come down and get up behind don’t you see he wants ballast.” Six others address the son: “When you have done there–set those Epigrams to Music young Apollo!”; “Off Off Off Off”; “he will be off presently if Neddy kicks so!”; “Go on Go on”; “Speak out you should have brought your Voice with you”; “hear him hear him.” The orchestra is empty of performers, but the music scores are headed ‘The Judgement of Midas’ [O’Keefe’s play]. Three large papers lie on the stage inscribed respectively: [1] ‘A Lord [Byron] and a Doctor once started for Fame Which for the best Poet should pass The Lord was cried up on account of his name The Doctor cried down for an Ass–‘ [2] ‘Doctor Buz he assures us on Drury new Stage No Horses or Elephants, there should engage But pray Doctor Buz, how comes it to pass, That you your own self should produce there an Ass’ [3] ‘Old Buz against Quadrupeds, war did wage, And swore on Drury’s board’s such Mum’ry ne’er should pass But forcing his own Pegasus on Drurys stage The Critic Audience christen’d Buz an Ass.’ Behind Raymond is the lower part of the verd-antique pillar which flanked the curtain, and on the right the large ornate lamp, of quasi-Egyptian design in which three hawk-headed monsters support an inverted tripod, the base of a ring of lamp-jets.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A buz in a box, or, The poet in a pet [graphic] : with a chip of the block, mounted on Papa’s Pegasus.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Octr. 21, 1812, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [21 October 1812]

Catalog Record

812.10.21.01+

Acquired July 2023

Do you want any brick-dust

description below

“A pretty young maidservant stands on a doorstep (right) while a man, Irish in appearance, gazes insinuatingly into her face as he fills her bowl with brick-dust from a jar. He has an ass which stands patiently, a double sack pannier-wise across his back and a second jar or measure standing on the sack. The profile of a shrewish old woman looks through the door at the couple, who are intent on each other. A dog barks at the girl. Behind is a street, the nearer houses tall the farther ones lower and gabled. At the doorway opposite a woman appears to be giving food to a poor woman and child. A man and woman lean from the attic windows of adjacent houses to converse. A little chimney-sweep emerges from a chimney, waving his brush.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Merke, Henri, printmaker.
  • Title: Do you want any brick-dust [graphic] / Rowlandson delin. ; Merke sculp.
  • Publication: London : Pub. Feb. 20, 1799, at R. Ackermann’s, 101 Strand, [20 February 1799]

Catalog Record

799.02.20.03+

Acquired April 2023

Arise, and take the young child

description below

“The Holy Family resting during the Flight into Egypt; St Joseph standing beside the donkey, drawing his cloak around him, the Virgin laying the infant Jesus on a rock, holding the edge of His garment in right hand, gesturing with the other, two cherubs standing together and watching to left.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Walker, James, approximately 1748-approximately 1822, printmaker, publisher.
  • Title: Vostavʺ poimi otrocha i materʹ ego, i bi︠e︡zhi vo Egipetʺ [graphic] = Arise, and take the young child, and his mother, and flee into Egypt / painted by Murillo ; Jas. Walker Engrr. to her I.M. and memr. of the Impl. Acady. of Arts St. Petersburg fecit.
    Воставъ поими отроча и матерь его, и бѣжи во Египетъ [graphic] = Arise, and take the young child, and his mother, and flee into Egypt / painted by Murillo ; Jas. Walker Engrr. to her I.M. and memr. of the Impl. Acady. of Arts St. Petersburg fecit.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d Jany. 1, 1792, as the act directs by Jas. Walker; St. Petersburg : W. Hodges, Queen Street, May Fair and R. Blamire, Strand, London, [1 January 1792]

Catalog Record

792.01.01.01++

Acquired April 2022

A tenth rejected, or, The dandyfied coxcomb in a bandbox

description below

“A farmyard scene, with a corner of the house on the left. A grossly fat and carbuncled parson on a quest for tithes encounters the farmer’s wife, who runs towards him proffering an open bandbox, with a dangling lid inscribed 10th. A miniature hussar, very dandified in shako and pelisse, stands in it, superciliously inspecting the parson through an eye-glass. The woman, who is plump and well-dressed, wearing apron and bonnet, says: Seeing your Reverence comeing for your Tithes, I have brought you a Tenth. The parson, who holds a large book, Tithe list, and has a chicken in his capacious pocket, answers with a scowl and gesture of refusal: Take it back! take it back! good Woman; I never tithe Monkeys. The little hussar says: Eh! eh! what does that there fellow say? An amused yokel with a pitchfork leans over a gate (left). A cock crows on a dunghill, an ass brays. Corn-sheaves stand in a distant field.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: tenth rejected, or, The dandyfied coxcomb in a bandbox [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 10th April 1824 by John Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, [10 April 1824]

Catalog Record

824.04.10.01+

Acquired January 2022

A North-ern ass

description below

“Satire on the election for County Durham, 14 April 1784: Sir Thomas Clavering and Sir John Upton, one headless, holding a caption labelled ‘The Irish Faction for ever’ and carrying the other, who has no feet, on his back, who says ‘I serv’d you as long as I could stand’ and carries captions lavelled ‘Coal owners Bill’ and ‘A command in India’; both seated on an ass facing left, which brays ‘Thus I go to Parliament and am not the first Ass that has farted for preferment, but this is dirty work and hard Labour’ and which has a collar labelled ‘I speak for my Master / Populus me sibilat at plaudo ipse domi’ and strips at the saddle labelled ‘Curse all Pitts / But a Coal-Pitt’; with the ass’ droppings falling on a crest with the motto ‘Diem Perdidi’; a mitre, crozier and sword and label ‘At rest’ on the ground in the centre, playing cards and papers labelled ‘Turnpike Speech / Election Speech’ to left; a milestone to right labelled ‘From Durham / T: C / J: E / 14 April 1784’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Hutchinson, W., active 1773-1784, printmaker.
  • Title: A North-ern ass [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1784]

Catalog Record

784.00.00.80

Acquired November 2020

The great general frightened by Don Key

description below

Wellington takes a flying stride from a braying ass (right) with tail erect and its feet firmly planted. His hair rises, his top-hat falls off, and he looks behind him to say: ‘Oh save me, save, Bob, run tell the King!’ The donkey (Key) brays ‘fe . fa . fum’. It wears a heavy chain and is draped by a furred livery gown marked with the City Arms.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, printmaker.
  • Title: The great general frightened by Don Key [graphic] / H. Heath fe.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 1830 by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [November 1830]

Catalog Record

830.11.00.02+

Acquired March 2020

Sutton

description belowA coach pulling up to the Post Station, the Cock Inn at left, on route to Brighton. The coach is pulling into the court yard, about to pass under a wooden gate bearing the inn’s sign, while another coach stands at the inn door. People look down from the second story windows. A man waits at the mile marker in front of another building at right. In the foreground to left, a man with a wooden leg carries a small child on his back as he leads a donkey that carries a woman and two children, one of whom appears to be nursing, the other in a basket that hangs over the donkey. Their dog follows behind.

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: Sutton [graphic] / drawn by Rowlandson ; tinted by Alken.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d June 1, 1790, by Messrs. Robinson’s, Paternoster Row, [1 June 1790]

Catalog Record 

790.06.01.02+

Acquired December 2019

Sporting characters

Detailed description below
On recto, two men walk to the left in a wood with guns. The man behind (right) holds his gun by the barrel pointed towards his companion’s posterior; he wears colored spectacles, a top hat, and is smoking a cigar. The man in front (left) looks back towards his companion as he holds his rifle by the butt, the barrel pointed over his shoulder at his companion’s face. The lines below: “I never likes to go out with a man as don’t carry his gun like a sportsman.” “Not I. I’m always wery particular.!”

On verso, a pencil drawing of two men (dustmen?) conversing as one points to the donkey that he holds by the reins.

Catalog Record 

Drawings H43 no. 1 Box D125

Acquired February 2019

The restive Pegasus…

“A man in ragged but quasi-fashionable dress rides (right to left) an ass through a river which flows past a steep mountain. The animal jibs, with ears set back; the rider raises a whip in each hand. He wears, and uses, three pairs of spurs, and attached to his shoulders and to the ass is a monstrous pile of bladders inscribed respectively ‘Repartee’, ‘Nonsensical Verses’, ‘Catastrophe’, ‘Sentiment’, ‘Blasphemies’, ‘Puns’, ‘Duels’, ‘Double Entendres’, ‘Metaphors’, ‘Ghosts’, ‘Melting Speeches’, ‘Squibs’, ‘Dialogue’, ‘Daggers Poisons’.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of a later state.

  • Printmaker: Grinagain, Giles, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: The restive Pegasus, or, The dramatic author foiled in his attempt to ascend Parnassus [graphic] / Giles Grinagain in. et f.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. July 25, 1802, by S. Howitt, Panton Street, [25 July 1802]

Catalog Record 

802.07.25.01

Acquired November 2017