Thomas Sutton commonplace book

manuscript notebook

A commonplace book kept by Thomas Sutton starting on 5 November 1819 in which he records anecdotes, quotations, epigrams, drinking toasts, many directly related to his home Nottingham and indicate the pride he feels in its history and people. He begins with a passage from John Blackner’s “The history of Nottingham” (1815) extolling the virtue of Nottingham men with a passage recounting an episode during the Glorious Revolution of 1688, followed by several passages from a range of sources in praise of Nottingham and its men, prominent political figures — Lord Grafton, Lord Dundas, Thomas Paine — and stories of local personalities. Nottingham ale warrants several pages of discourse. He provides a lengthy account of a canal boat accident, which is illustrated with a line-drawn plan followed by an extract from Christian Ignatiyus Latrobe’s Journal of a visit to South Africa in 1815 and 1816 about the destruction done by wolves at Groenekloof and the attempt of the missionaries and the native people to hunt them down and a confrontation with a tiger. Also included are copies of four letters sent by his uncle Charles Peck relating to his volunteering for an expedition to the Congo with Major Peddie, his trip along the River Gambia to Senegal, and a letter from Sierra Leone announcing his uncle’s death with a discussion of the money due him from the expedition. The remaining bulk of the volume contains excerpts from The Nottingham Review, toasts, poems by Pope, Thomas Paine, Robert Burns, Thomas Moore; comical stories as well as political events including the death of King George III. He provides a detailed, alphabetic list of the towns, boroughs, and remarkable villages in England and Wales. He relates a story about a wager laid by Colly Cibber and Pope; a woman named Jenny Hickling of Nottingham, bedridden for 61 years and other stories that piqued his attention. His interest in Africa continues in 1823 when he copies several pages from Campbell’s Travels in Africa.

  • Author: Sutton, Thomas, author.
  • Title: Thomas Sutton commonplace book : manuscript.
  • Production: Nottingham, England, 1819-1826.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss vol. 266

Acquired July 2021

Album of watercolors of the countryside around Weston Sands House

description below

An album of watercolors assembled by the gentleman farmer and amateur artist John Tomes showing views of his manor house Weston Sands House and the surrounding countryside. Tomes recorded his estate from many angles and in all seasons as well as picturesque spots in the neighbouring countryside, including several views of the River Avon which bordered his estate. Also included are a series of watercolors taken on a trip to the Isle of Wight. There is also a view of Windsor Castle (?) across the Thames and many watercolors of medieval ruins, abbeys, and castles. Tomes also copied a number of Turner prints from the ‘Liber Studiorum’ (published 1807-1819) and his ‘Picturesque views on the Southern Coast’ (published 1814-1826).

  • Artist: Tomes, John, 1791-1863, artist.
  • Title: [Album of watercolors of the countryside around Weston Sands House] [art original].
  • Production: [Warwickshire, England], [ca. 1818-1850]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 T656 818

Acquired April 2021

Arrival of the flotilla of Admiral Howe

description belowUnsigned; attributed to Rowlandson.
Inscribed on verso: Names of the Ships taken by Lord Howe on 1st of June 1794, and brought into Portsmouth Harbour; Sans Pareille 84 Guns, L’America 74, Limpetue 84, Northumberland 84, Achille 76, La Vengeur 74.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: [Arrival of the flotilla of Admiral Howe into Portsmouth Harbour on 1 June 1794] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [1794]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no. 17 Box 2

Acquired August 2020

Four naive watercolors depicting scenes…

see description belowFour sketches depicting scenes from accounts published in periodicals of the early 1820s, including The Mirror of Literature, Amusement and Instruction, volume I, 1822-23. The drawing ‘Janvier About to Kill the Indian Who had Relieved His Hunger’ illustrates the tale of Charles Janvier, which was was first published in John Long’s Voyages and Travels of an Indian Interpreter and Trader, 1791. The Mirror published an abridged version in November 1822. Janvier and two other servants had been sent by their master, Mr. Fulton, to catch supplies of meat and fish. Saved from hunger by a passing native Canadian who gives them food, Janvier kills and eats the stranger, a fate he later inflicts on one of his fellow servants. Volume I of The Mirror also recounts the story of the ‘Rescue of the Emperor Basilius Maredo’, the final sketch in this volume. The Emperor, snagged by a stag whilst hunting, is saved by the sword of a servant who is subsequently sentenced to death for drawing his sword in the presence of the Emperor. The tale of the first sketch, ‘Sultan Mahamoud punishing a Ravisher’, is told in Knapp and Baldwin’s Newgate Calendar, 1824. The final sketch, ‘A Miser Distracted’, appears to be a depiction of Aesop’s fable ‘The Miser and his Gold’, in which a miser concentrates all his wealth into one lump of gold which he buries before it is stolen from him.

 

  • Title: [Four naive watercolors depicting scenes from accounts published in periodicals of the early 1820s] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1823]

Catalog Record

75 A2 823

Acquired July 2020

Count Ugolino and his children in the dungeon

man with children in prison cellA scene from Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’ showing Count Ugolino della Gherardesca, Count of Donoratico (c. 1220-1289), an Italian nobleman, politician and naval commander and his sons and grandchildren imprisoned in a dungeon. After Reynolds.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: [Count Ugolino and his children in the dungeon] [art original] / T. Rowlandson.
  • Production: [England], [not before 1773]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no. 18 Box D205

Acquired August 2020

The Ram’s Head Inn

men in a tavern

A scene in a tavern with a pair of inebriated men sitting on a bench in front of fireplace, smoking pipes and drinking from tankards, a dog at their feet. Another man from the next booth leans over the wall to engage them in conversation which they seem not to enjoy. In the next booth (right) a group of four men play cards while a fifth looks on.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: [The Ram’s Head Inn] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1785]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no.16 Box 2

Acquired August 2020

Monastery of St. Trone

description below

A watercolor sketch of two rotund monks in front of a entrance to monastery in a lane within gate and wall surround. One attends closely to a young lady with two baskets on her arms; the other reads, lounging on a bench with his one foot raised.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: Monastery of St. Trone [art original].
  • Production: [England], [early 19th century]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no. 15 Box D145

Acquired July 2020

Mr. John Bull in a quandary

description below

An unfinished sketch for the engraving which appeared in the November 1845 issue of “George Cruikshank’s Table-book,” illustrating a brief article on railroad speculation by the periodical’s editor, Gilbert Abbott a Beckett. John Bull is beset by lilliputian tormentors who are removing all his cash, clothing, and possessions, beneath clouds of steam and a clanging bell.

 

  • Artist: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, artist.
  • Title: Mr. John Bull in a quandary, or, The anticipated effects of the railway calls [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1845]

Catalog Record

Drawings C889 no. 8 Box D115

Acquired July 2020

Georgian playing cards

description below

A set of playing cards drawn by an unidentified artist, showing caricatured figures; each vignette incorporates the formation of hearts or diamonds into the scene. Some of the cards are numbered or annotated on the backs while others show drafts of other sketches. The set contains only the red suits and with cards numbered from one to ten in each, although some numbers are missing and there are multiples of other numbers. Illustrations are also duplicated while others appear not to have been finished. There are no cards with clubs and spades. A number of the cards center on Shakespearean themes, social history and street scenes (such as courtroom drama, musicians performing, a man in the stocks and, in a few, card playing itself). Some of the scenes depicted on these cards show the more ribald, drawing from Macbeth’s Weird Sisters, Twelfth Night, King John, and The Merry Wives of Windsor; several are annotated on the reverse with lines from the plays. Falstaff is featured on several cards. Many of the cards reflect the mores of the period and the contrast between ruling passions and rules of conduct. In one, two men cast judgment upon a pregnant woman. It is annotated on the reverse with a dialogue between a Constable and a Judge. In “Village School” a schoolteacher manages to simultaneously hold a book and pinch a child’s ear (nine of hearts). Other subjects include a game of chess (five of diamonds); drinking and smoking in a pub (seven of diamonds); and “Bunbury’s Country Club” in which the artist has kept elements from the print (published circa 1788) for the six of diamonds. On one card the artist depicts a game of whist (annotated on the reverse “Can you one?”) for the ten of diamonds.

 

  • Title: [Georgian playing cards] [art original].
  • Production: [England], ca. 1800-1820.

Catalog Record

Drawings Un58 G

Acquired February 2020

The itinerant chancellor

description belowA copy of the caricature of the British Statesman and High Lord Chancellor Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778-1868), that appeared in the center of an print that was published on 1 October 1834 in Every body’s album & caricature magazine, no. 19. He is depicted as a very thin traveller wearing a Scottish tam over his wig and using a broom as a walking stick; his shoe is worn through. He carries a wooden post labelled “Scratching post”, a box stamped “Containing the freedoms of all the Scotch towns” and a bag with the words “Broken victuals the leavings of the Edinburgh blow out”. Around his waist is another bag, “Oat meal”. Above the image framed in lines in gold ink: “I flatter myself I’ve made a tolerable good job by my “Starring it” with Old Grey in the North! Sold all my numbers of the Penny Magazine, and well puff’d it through every town I went. Made little less than one hundred speeches about, I forget now, Received some score of Burgesses, Freedoms, and Invitations to as many dinners, where I blew my own trumpet & obtained plenty of orders from our Usefull Knowledge Society! Now, woe to the unstamn’d when I get home! I must have a good scrub at my skin presently; I reckon I have got a taste of the fiddle through my itch for travelling!

  • Creator: M., M. S., artist.
  • Title: The itinerant chancellor [art original] / M.S.M. pinxt. March 39.
  • Production: [England], [March 1839]

Catalog Record

Drawings M999 no. 1 Box D205

Acquired December 2019