Evening

description below

The third print in the series “Four Times of the Day” is set at Sadler’s Wells. “A dyer and his wife walking with their dog beside the New River; the wife holds a fan with a design of Aphrodite and Adonis, the husband carries a small child, a somewhat older boy stands behind them in tears because his sister is demanding the gingerbread figure he holds; behind them is a young woman holding a shoe and a cow being milked by another woman; to the right is a tavern with the sign of Sir Hugh Middleton’s Head, two women and a man are in the tavern garden, other figures are visible through the window, and a grape vine is climbing up towards the roof.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cook, Thomas, approximately 1744-1818, printmaker.
  • Title: Evening [graphic] / designed by Wm. Hogarth ; engraved by T. Cook.
  • Publication: [London] : Published December the 1st, 1797, by G.G. & J. Robinson, Pater-noster Row, London, [1 December 1797]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 797.12.01.01++ Box 310

Acquired January 2021

Going to court he’s arrested at St. James’s Gate

description below

“Piracy of plate IV of Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress with considerable differences: a scene in St James’s Street with the Rake (here named Ramble) emerging from a sedan-chair to be arrested for debt; figures in the foreground include a Welshman, probably the creditor, honouring St David’s day (March 1st) with a leek in his hat, “Nanny” offering a handful of money to reprieve her former lover, and a lamp-lighter carelessly spilling oil on the Rake’s coat; in the distance to left, a group of street-boys point to “Taffy”, a mannikin, perched on a lamp-post, and beyond the gate of St James’s Palace.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Bowles, Thomas, -1767, printmaker.
  • Title: Going to court he’s arrested at St. James’s Gate [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [John Bowles], [1735]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 735.00.00.20+ Box 200

Acquired January 2021

The library

description belowA scene in a fashionable library with ladies and gentlemen conversing with attendants at the counters on either side. On the left a woman looks in a book while her male companion converses with a clergyman, as the woman behind the counter consults a book. On the right, a man sits in a chair as a lady discusses her choices with the man behind the counter who reaches for a book below a sign ‘Stamp’. Behind him is another sign “Just published […]” An older woman with a walking stick approaches the counter on the right, followed by a Black servant and a dog. The windows are filled with books and prints. Through the open door a woman with an umbrella is silhouetted; to the left another sign “History Westminster and its monuments.”

 

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker.
  • Title: The library [graphic] / J. Green delt.
  • Publication: [London] : [R. Ackermann], [1813]

Catalog Record

813.00.00.24

Acquired November 2020

The Ram’s Head Inn

men in a tavern

A scene in a tavern with a pair of inebriated men sitting on a bench in front of fireplace, smoking pipes and drinking from tankards, a dog at their feet. Another man from the next booth leans over the wall to engage them in conversation which they seem not to enjoy. In the next booth (right) a group of four men play cards while a fifth looks on.

 

  • Artist: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, artist.
  • Title: [The Ram’s Head Inn] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1785]

Catalog Record

Drawings R79 no.16 Box 2

Acquired August 2020

A capital joke

description belowA group of gentlemen seated at an oval table, with glasses full of wine, laugh uproariously at a joke as they look down at the dog at the foot of the table.

 

  • Title: A capital joke [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sept. 1823 by J. Dickinson, 114 New Bond St., [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.02

Acquired June 2020

No effect

description below

A young gentlemen sits in a chair opposite three fashionable young ladies and their mother who are seated on a sofa. His wide grin suggests that he has amused himself with an anecdote, but the expressions on the ladies’ faces indcate that he has failed to amuse them. One of the young ladies looks down at the dog in her lap, another looks at her fan.

  • Title: No effect [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sepr. 1823 by J. Dickinson [illegible], [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.01

Acquired June 2020

Mad in Bedlam

description belowCopy (reversed) of the first state of Plate 8 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 139), after the painting at Sir John Soane’s Museum.: A scene in Bedlam with Tom half-naked and in a state of distress attended by Sarah Young, a clergyman, and a warder; in the background, an inmate who believes himself to be God has cheap prints of saints pinned to his cell wall. Two elegantly dressed female visitors whisper together, the one holding a fan against her face to shield from her view an inmate in a cell who believes he is King and sits naked, save for a crown, urinating on his straw bed. The wall and the banister of a staircase to the right are covered with various graffiti including calculations of longitude.

  • Title: Mad in Bedlam [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.08+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

He marries a rich old widow

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 5 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 136): Tom and a wealthy old woman are being married in the dilapidated church of St. Marylebone. The bride has only one eye and growths on her forehead; the IHS on the wall behind her serve as a mock halo. In contrast the old woman is attended by a beautiful young woman who has already caught Tom’s eye. In the background on the left, the elderly pew opener pushes Sarah Young, carrying Tom’s child in her arms, and Sarah’s mother; she shakes her keys in their faces to prevent them from entering the church to stop the marriage. Two dogs in the lower left of the image mirror the courtship of Tom and his bride; the courted dog has only one eye. The clergyman is assisted at the altar by a clerk, and a charity-boy kneels at the bride’s feet offering a hassock. The Poor Box on the left is covered with a cobweb; there is a crack down the center of the slab with the Commandments on the wall behind the clergyman.

  • Title: He marries a rich old widow [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.05+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Ruin’d at a gaming table

description belowCopy (not reversed) of the first state of Plate 6th of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 137): Interior of a gambling house in Covent Garden where Tom has fallen, raving, on one knee having lost his money at dice; behind him a chaotic group of gamblers, most of whom fail to notice that flames and smoke are pouring over the panelling and through the door (left); to right, a highwayman (a gun and mask in his pocket) sits beside the hearth ignoring a small boy who offers him a drink, on the wall is a handbill advertising “R. Tustian Card Maker” — British Museum online catalogue. On the lower left, a man is entering a note of a loan to Lord Cogg for £500. A dog with a color “Covent Gar[den]” barks at Tom.

  • Title: Ruin’d at a gaming table [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.06+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Is arrested going to court

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 4 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 135): In this scene two baliffs, one with an arrest notice in his hand, have stopped Tom Rakewell’s sedan chair in St. James’s Street; Tom is presumably on his way to White’s gaming house which can be seen in the background. They are foiled in their attempt to arrest Tom for debt as Sarah Young, the young woman whom he had seduced and abandoned, offers the bailiffs her purse instead. Sarah is now a dealer in millinery as is suggested by the notions falling from her purse. In the right foreground a shoe-black apparently taking advantage of the situation to take hold of Tom’s elegant walking stick. Above them a careless lamplighter spills some oil on Tom’s head. To the left a Welshman, probably the creditor, honouring St David’s day (March 1st) with a leek in his hat, accompanied by his manicured dog, simply watches the scene. In the distance is the gate of St James’s Palace with a crowd of sedan-chairs approaching to celebrate the birthday of Queen Caroline.

  • Title: Is arrested going to court [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.04+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019