A master parson with a good living

description below

In a richly decorated and carpeted interior, an obese clergyman with his equally large, bespectacled wife sit at a dining table with their three children; on the back wall hangs a portrait of the clergyman. He raises a wineglass to his lips as a servant uncorks another bottle of wine.

 

  • Artist: Dighton, Robert, 1752-1814, artist.
  • Title: [A master parson with a good living] [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1782]

Catalog Record

Drawings D574 no. 6 Framed

Acquired October 2020

Evening, or, The man of feeling

description belowThree men sit by a supper-table, a grandfather-clock behind them points to XI. The man on the left is having his jack-boots pulled off by a small boy; the boy stands astride his right leg pulling hard, his back to the man, who is scowling and pushes his other booted foot against the boy’s back; on the floor are a pair of spurs, a pair of slippers, and a boot-jack. A man (right) wearing a night-cap, but otherwise completely dressed and wearing spurred boots, leans one elbow on the table, his face contorted as if in pain, he holds his hand to his thigh. On the table beside him is a small packet inscribed “Diaculum”. In the centre, and on the farther side of the table, the third man leans both elbows on the table, his hair is tousled and his eyes are shut. A servant behind, yawning, is carrying off a square box, probably a wig-box, while a maidservant stands on the right, a candle in one hand, a warming-pan in the other, watching with amusement the efforts of the boy to pull off the boot. Three hats hang on the wall; a bottle, a plate, three wine-glasses, and a guttering candle, burnt down to the socket, stand on the table. See related image in the British Museum catalogue.

 

  • Title: Evening, or, The man of feeling [graphic] / design’d by W.H. Bunbury Esqr.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1818]

Catalog Record

816.00.00.81+

Acquired November 2020

Durhm Saugur, Comilla

description below

A Bangladeshi hunting scene showing three riders, one a woman riding side-saddle, following a pack of hounds; Indian servants and an English family in the foreground.

 

  • Title: Durhm Saugur, Comilla [graphic].
  • Publication: [Comilla, Bangladesh?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1820]

Catalog Record

820.00.00.92+

Acquired August 2020

A harlots progress. Plate VI

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 6 of A harlot’s progress: A dilapidated room with Moll Hackabout’s friends, mostly prostitutes, gathered around her open coffin, several of them weeping; one young woman stands with her back to the scene as she gazes at herself in the mirror. On the right, a clergyman spills his brandy as he surreptitiously gropes beneath a woman’s skirt; Moll’s serving woman, standing at the coffin with a wine bottle and glass in hand scowls at the pair. Under the window and to the left, the undertaker flirts with a pretty young prostitute who picks a handkerchief from his pocket. In the foreground Moll’s small son plays with a spinning top. Sprigs of yew (rosemary?) decorate her coffin; a plate of yew rests on the floor at the parson’s feet, another spring at her son’s feet.

  • Title: A harlots progress. Plate VI [graphic] : Her funeral properly attended = Pompe de ses funérailles / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.14+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

 

A harlot’s progress. Plate V

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 5 of A harlot’s progress: In a squalid room Moll Hackabout, wrapped in a sheet, is dying while two doctors (Richard Rock and Jean Misaubin) argue over their remedies. Her serving-woman reaches out to them in alarm to get their attention for the invalid, while another woman rifles through Moll’s portmanteau (with her initials as in Plate 1). A small boy knelling next to Moll’s chair scratches his head as he turns a joint of meat roasting in front of the fire while a pot overflows on the grate. An over-turned table with an advertisement “Practical scheme … ‘Anodyne” litters the floor in the foreground.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate V [graphic] : In a high salivation at the point of death = Elle meurt en passant par le grand-reméde / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.13+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

A harlot’s progress. Plate III

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 3 of A harlot’s progress: In a shabby room in Drury Lane; Moll Hackabout is shown having risen late (the watch shows 11:45), attended by a serving-woman who has lost part of her nose to syphilis; in the background, the magistrate, John Gonson, enters quietly with officers to arrest her; pinned to the window frame are two portrait prints of the hero and heroines of “The Beggar’s Opera”, Captain Mackheath and Polly Peacham, (Polly replaces Dr. Sacheverell in Hogarth’s print), the wig-box of James Dalton, highwayman, sits above the bed, and one of several beer tankards on the floor carries the name of a Drury Lane tavern. A kitten plays at Moll’s feet. A copy of Bishop Gibson’s “Pastoral Letter to …” serves as a butter dish. Above the window on the left is a print after a Titian painting depicting the angel staying the hand of Abraham as he is about to slay Isaac. Medicine bottles on the window sill suggest that Molly is already ill with the disease that will later kill her.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate III [graphic] : The compleat trull at her lodgings in Drury Lane = Elle est reduite à la misère dans son logement de Drury Lane / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.11+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Revelling with harlots

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 3 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 134): A room at the Rose Tavern, Drury Lane (after the painting at Sir John Soane’s Museum); to left, Tom, surrounded by prostitutes and clearly drunk, sprawls on a chair with his foot on the table; one young woman embraces him and steals his watch, another spits a stream of gin across the table to the amusement of a young black woman standing in the background; one woman drinks from the punchbowl; another is removing her clothes in order to perform “postures”; to the right, a harpist and a door through which enters a man holding a large dish and a candle, and a pregnant ballad singer holding a sheet lettered “Black Joke”; on the walls hang a map of the world to which a young woman holds a candle and framed prints of Roman emperors, all (except that of Nero) damaged. A second version of the paintings is at the Atkins Museum (Kansas City, Missouri).

  • Title: Revelling with harlots [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.03+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Taking possession of his father’s effects

description below

Copy in reverse of the first state of Plate 1 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 132): the Jacobean interior of the house of Tom Rakewell’s late father with Tom at left being measured for a suit as he gives a handful of coins to the pregnant Sarah Young; behind him sits a lawyer compiling inventories; on the floor are boxes of miscellaneous goods, piles of mortgages, indentures, bond certificates and other documents; an old woman brings faggots to light a fire and an upholsterer attaching fabric (purchased from William Tothall of Covent Garden) to the wall reveals a hiding place for coins which tumble out.–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Taking possession of his father’s effects [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.01+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Attended by his levee in London

description belowCopy (not reversed) of the first state of Plate 2 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 133): a fashionable interior with Tom, in elegant indoor dress, surrounded by tradesmen vying for his custom: a poet, a wigmaker, a tailor, a musician (with a list of presents given by aristocrats to the popular castrato, Farinelli), a fencing master (said to be named Dubois), a prizefighter with quarter-staffs (said to be James Figg), a dancing master (John Essex?), a landscape-gardener (said to be Charles Bridgeman), a bodyguard, a huntsman and a jockey.–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Attended by his levee in London [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.02+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Anticipation, or, Taxes as they will be!!

In seven scenes in a design of two tiers, citizens dispute the oppressive fees imposed by a zealous tax collector who taxes bugs, pets, a bulbous nose and a runny nose, corns on a foot, and a man’s skin. In the scene on the upper right, the tax collector penalizes a man whom he accuses of evading tax as he defecates in a bush.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Anticipation, or, Taxes as they will be!! [graphic] / Woodward delnt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. June 1st, 1796, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, corner of Sackville Street …, [1 June 1796]

Catalog Record 

796.06.01.03+

Acquired October 2019