A harlots progress. Plate VI

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 6 of A harlot’s progress: A dilapidated room with Moll Hackabout’s friends, mostly prostitutes, gathered around her open coffin, several of them weeping; one young woman stands with her back to the scene as she gazes at herself in the mirror. On the right, a clergyman spills his brandy as he surreptitiously gropes beneath a woman’s skirt; Moll’s serving woman, standing at the coffin with a wine bottle and glass in hand scowls at the pair. Under the window and to the left, the undertaker flirts with a pretty young prostitute who picks a handkerchief from his pocket. In the foreground Moll’s small son plays with a spinning top. Sprigs of yew (rosemary?) decorate her coffin; a plate of yew rests on the floor at the parson’s feet, another spring at her son’s feet.

  • Title: A harlots progress. Plate VI [graphic] : Her funeral properly attended = Pompe de ses funérailles / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.14+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

 

A harlot’s progress. Plate V

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 5 of A harlot’s progress: In a squalid room Moll Hackabout, wrapped in a sheet, is dying while two doctors (Richard Rock and Jean Misaubin) argue over their remedies. Her serving-woman reaches out to them in alarm to get their attention for the invalid, while another woman rifles through Moll’s portmanteau (with her initials as in Plate 1). A small boy knelling next to Moll’s chair scratches his head as he turns a joint of meat roasting in front of the fire while a pot overflows on the grate. An over-turned table with an advertisement “Practical scheme … ‘Anodyne” litters the floor in the foreground.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate V [graphic] : In a high salivation at the point of death = Elle meurt en passant par le grand-reméde / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.13+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

A harlot’s progress. Plate III

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 3 of A harlot’s progress: In a shabby room in Drury Lane; Moll Hackabout is shown having risen late (the watch shows 11:45), attended by a serving-woman who has lost part of her nose to syphilis; in the background, the magistrate, John Gonson, enters quietly with officers to arrest her; pinned to the window frame are two portrait prints of the hero and heroines of “The Beggar’s Opera”, Captain Mackheath and Polly Peacham, (Polly replaces Dr. Sacheverell in Hogarth’s print), the wig-box of James Dalton, highwayman, sits above the bed, and one of several beer tankards on the floor carries the name of a Drury Lane tavern. A kitten plays at Moll’s feet. A copy of Bishop Gibson’s “Pastoral Letter to …” serves as a butter dish. Above the window on the left is a print after a Titian painting depicting the angel staying the hand of Abraham as he is about to slay Isaac. Medicine bottles on the window sill suggest that Molly is already ill with the disease that will later kill her.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate III [graphic] : The compleat trull at her lodgings in Drury Lane = Elle est reduite à la misère dans son logement de Drury Lane / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.11+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Revelling with harlots

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 3 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 134): A room at the Rose Tavern, Drury Lane (after the painting at Sir John Soane’s Museum); to left, Tom, surrounded by prostitutes and clearly drunk, sprawls on a chair with his foot on the table; one young woman embraces him and steals his watch, another spits a stream of gin across the table to the amusement of a young black woman standing in the background; one woman drinks from the punchbowl; another is removing her clothes in order to perform “postures”; to the right, a harpist and a door through which enters a man holding a large dish and a candle, and a pregnant ballad singer holding a sheet lettered “Black Joke”; on the walls hang a map of the world to which a young woman holds a candle and framed prints of Roman emperors, all (except that of Nero) damaged. A second version of the paintings is at the Atkins Museum (Kansas City, Missouri).

  • Title: Revelling with harlots [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.03+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

The only true list, of those celebrated sporting ladies

see description below

  • Title: The only true list, of those celebrated sporting ladies, or petticoat amblers, who afford the bucks and bloods an amorous felicity every evening during the races.
  • Publication: [Lichfield, England?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1780]

Catalog Record 

Quarto 646 780 On58

Acquired June 2019

 

Melancholy loss of the medal

A magistrate sits behind his table listening intently to the angry harangue of a naval officer

“A magistrate sits behind his table listening intently to the angry harangue of a naval officer (right) who faces the accused (left), demure-looking, plainly-dressed woman, wearing a checked apron tucked round her waist, but evidently a prostitute. She is supported by two keen-looking lawyers. The officer, who is paunchy and wears very wide white trousers, stands with legs apart, right arm extended with pointing forefinger. He shouts: No. No. I’ve found my Breeches, but consider your Worship how I shall be Quized–The L–d H–h-A–l knows all about it. I never was before the Public but once, shant forget that in a hurry–Yes–yes I found the breeches, but where’s my Silver Gilt Trafalgar Medal eh? I’ll have it if it costs me a Thousand Pounds. I could’ent live without it. Ay Ay she’s the Thief but I will not hang her unless your worship wishes it–If I had her aboard my Ship D–n me I’de give her a round dozen–I would. Behind him stand a footboy in livery and two rough-looking men. The woman extends both arms and says pathetically I never robbed you Sir. The lawyer says: There’s no proof you cant Harm–her.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Melancholy loss of the medal [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1828?]

Catalog Record 

828.00.00.01+ Impression 2

Acquired October 2018

Water cresses, come buy my water cresses

lwlpr34239 (833x1024)

“A decrepit old man stands at the door of a house of ill fame at the corner of Portland Street; Mrs Burke is on the door-plate. One hand is on the knocker; he turns to scowl at a woman (right) who holds out a bunch of water-cress from a large shallow basket slung from the hip. A child clings to her shoulders; a little girl (left) with a small basket also offers him a bunch. Two young courtesans lean from a first-floor window. In the background (right), behind a spiked gate, are trees and a large house (or houses).”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerMerke, Henri, printmaker.
  • TitleWater cresses, come buy my water cresses [graphic] / Rowlandson delin. ; Merke sculp.
  • PublicationLondon : Pub. Mar. 1, 1799, at R. Ackermann’s, 101 Strand, [1 March 1799]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

799.03.01.06+

Acquired March 2016

Kitty’s Attalantis

Kitty’s Attalantis

Published: London : Printed for J. Harrison, near Covent-Garden, [1766?]

646 766 K62

Acquired in honor of Marcus A. McCorison and on the occasion of his retirement from the Board of Managers, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, April 2009.

Bound in 19th century half plum morocco, marbled boards

Bound in 19th c. half plum morocco, marbled boards

Kitty’s Attalantis

Kitty’s Attalantis

Kitty’s Attalantis

Kitty’s Attalantis

Subjects (Library of Congress): Prostitutes–Biography

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: April, 2009