Britannia correcting an unruly boy

description below

“Britannia, tall and powerful, holds Napoleon across her knee, and raises a birch rod to thrash his bleeding posterior. She wears Roman draperies, with corslet and plumed helmet. The rod is tied with a ribbon inscribed: ‘United Kingdoms’. She says: “There take that and that and that, and be carefull not to provoke my Anger more.” He exclaims: “oh forgive me this time and I never will do so again, oh dear! oh dear! you’ll entirely spoil the Honors of the Sitting.” Beside Britannia (left) are her spear and sword; beside Napoleon (right) his huge cocked hat and sabre. The scene is by the sea (left), with a fleet of retreating vessels flying the tricolour flag. On the right is a cliff on which a small British lion lies on a scroll inscribed: ‘Qui uti scit ei bona’ [good things to him who knows how to use them].”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Britannia correcting an unruly boy [graphic] / T. West delt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. June 13th, 1803, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [13 June 1803]

Catalog Record

803.06.13.01+

Acquired January 2021

Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador

description below

“Napoleon (right) stands between two Russians; one (left) he strikes on the chin with his fist, saying, “There Sir take that, and tel your Master, I’ll thras every one who dares to speak to me I’ll thrash all the World D -me I’ll, I’ll I,’ll be King of the Universe.” The injured Russian stares, saying, “Why this is club Law; this is the Argument of force indeed the little Gentleman is Dêrangé.” Behind Napoleon (right) an officer in fur cloak and hussar’s cap watches with indignation, saying, “The Monarch I represent, will return this insult with becoming dignity.” On the left John Bull, jovial and grossly fat, and wearing top-boots, puts his arm across the shoulders of a pugilist, and points to Napoleon, saying, “There my Boy is an Ambassador who will treat with you in your own way, but I say be as gentle with him as you can.” The good-looking brawny pugilist, who is stripped to the waist, clenches his fists, saying, “what! is it that little Whipper snapper I am to set too with why I think the first round will settle his hash.” [An early use of this phrase which disproves Partridge, ‘Slang Dict., tracing it in England to 1825, and in U.S.A. to 1807, suggesting that the English may have learnt it in the war of 1812. It was clearly current in England by 1803] Bonaparte is small and youthful, caricatured chiefly by the disproportionate size of cocked hat and sabre.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Author: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador to the Grand Consul [graphic] / Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, London, June 16, 1803.

Catalog Record

803.06.16.02+

Acquired January 2021

Apparition du globe aerostatique de Mr. Blanchard

description belowA scene in rural France: A farmer holding onto a plow drawn by a team of oxen, shepherds with their sheep, and a man fishing in a stream, all look up in astonishment at the air balloon overhead. This print references the third flight of Jean-Pierre Blanchard, his second with American John Jeffries and the first flight over the English Channel.

 

  • Printmaker: Bonvallet, L. (Louis), approximately 1748-1818, printmaker.
  • Title: Apparition du globe aerostatique de Mr. Blanchard, entre Calais et Boulogne parti de Douvres le 7 de Janvier 1785 à 1 heure 1/2 [graphic] / dessiné par Desrais ; gravé́ par L. Bonvalet.
  • Publication: A Paris : Chez Basset rue St. Jacques au coin de celle des Mathurins, [1785]

Catalog Record

785.01.00.01+

Acquired January 2021

The frontispiece and its explanation

frontispieceA copy of the Hogarth’s Frontispiece and its explanation for Samuel Butler’s poem Hudibras with the title engraved above the image and the text below in a single sentence below. Plate one is an emblematic scene with an oval portrait of Samuel Butler mounted on a pedestal on which is carved a relief showing a satyr whipping figures of Rebellion, Hypocrisy and Ignorance dressed as puritans, while he drives a chariot drawn by Hudibras and Ralpho; in the foreground, on the left, a satyr holds up a volume of Butler’s poem as a guide for the carver (a boy dressed only in an apron), and on the right a young satyr holds up a mirror to a figure of Britannia.

 

  • Title: The frontispiece and its explanation [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Printed and sold by Robt. Sayer, map & printseller at No. 53 in Fleet Street, [between 1760 and 1777?]

Catalog Record

Folio 75 H67 768B

Acquired January 2021

Thomas Hewerdine, oil and colour-man

printed text

Includes a printed list of paints and oils, as well as other chandlery goods including preserved goods, grocery stores and other materials of use on board.

 

  • Title: Thomas Hewerdine, oil and colour-man, at the sign of the Colour-Grinder, the corner of Barnaby-Street, in Tooley Street, Southwark, London; Sells all sorts of colours ready prepared (at the lowest prices) for house or ship painting; that any gentlemen builders, &c. may set their servants to work, at an easy expence, by the help of a printed direction, he gives with his colours.
  • Publication: [Southwark, London] : [Thomas Hewerdine], [1765]

Catalog Record

File 66 765 T454

Acquired January 2021

Hudibras and Sidrophel

description below

“Episode from Butler’s ‘Hudibras’, after Hogarth; four men around table in interior, one in rich clothes sitting beneath canopy and writing document, gesticulating at the three others, who look shocked; globe and papers in centre at base of table.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Gaugain, Thomas, -1810?, printmaker.
  • Title: Hudibras and Sidrophel [graphic] : from an original in the possession of Mr. Vincent / painted by Wm. Hogarth ; engraved by Thom. Gaugain.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Oct. 1, 1782, by T. Gaugain, No. 4 Little Compton Street, London, [1 October 1782]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 782.10.01.01+

Acquired January 2021

Consultation of physicians

description below

A group portrait of various doctors and quacks, including Mrs Mapp, Dr. Joshua Ward and John Taylor. A version of the print also published with lettering “The company of undertakers”. The three named quacks occupy the top, twelve other ‘doctors’ are situated in the lower half; most of them have gold canes held up to their noses, one is dipping his finger into a urinal while another holds it.

 

  • Title: Consultation of physicians [graphic] / Wm. Hogarth invt.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Bowles & Carver, No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London, [ca. 1817]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 817.00.00.24

Acquired January 2021