Crawley

 

description belowA crowd, gathered in the courtyard under the sign of The George Inn on the route to Brighton, examine a horse seemingly under auction; a man in the doorway holds up a hammer. People look out at the scene from the windows of the inn. Two men converse with a woman to the left as her dog looks at the scene; a traveler with a pack and walking stick sits on a stoop to adjust his shoe.

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: Crawley [graphic] / drawn by Rowlandson ; tinted by Alken.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d June 1, 1790, by Messrs. Robinsons, Paternoster Row, [1 June 1790]

Catalog Record

790.06.01.03+

Acquired December 2019

Sutton

description belowA coach pulling up to the Post Station, the Cock Inn at left, on route to Brighton. The coach is pulling into the court yard, about to pass under a wooden gate bearing the inn’s sign, while another coach stands at the inn door. People look down from the second story windows. A man waits at the mile marker in front of another building at right. In the foreground to left, a man with a wooden leg carries a small child on his back as he leads a donkey that carries a woman and two children, one of whom appears to be nursing, the other in a basket that hangs over the donkey. Their dog follows behind.

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: Sutton [graphic] / drawn by Rowlandson ; tinted by Alken.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d June 1, 1790, by Messrs. Robinson’s, Paternoster Row, [1 June 1790]

Catalog Record 

790.06.01.02+

Acquired December 2019

A harlot’s progress. Plate I

description belowA copy in reverse of William Hogarth’s Plate 1 of A harlot’s progress: A scene outside the Bell Inn: a country girl, Moll Hackabout, having just arrived on the York Wagon (seen on the right), meets an extravagantly dressed bawd (Mother Needham); a clergyman on horseback fails to notice the encounter, but a lecherous old gentleman (Colonel Charteris) eyes the girl with anticipation. In the lower left the girl’s initials “H.M.” (M[ary?] Hackabout, initials reversed on this copy) are on her portmanteau, next to which is a basket with a goose with a note around its neck, “For my Loving Cosen in Tems Stret in London”, presumably the person who has failed to meet her. In the background a woman hangs out her laundry on a balcony. A clergyman on horseback fails to notice the encounter as his horse feeds on hay next to the wagon. In the back of the wagon, four other country girls sit holding onto a rail.

  • Title: A harlot’s progress. Plate I [graphic] : Innocence betrayed, or The journey to London = L’innocence trahie, ou, Le voyage de Londres / invented & painted by Wm. Hogarth.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [not before 25 March 1768]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.09+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Revelling with harlots

description belowCopy in reverse of the first state of Plate 3 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 134): A room at the Rose Tavern, Drury Lane (after the painting at Sir John Soane’s Museum); to left, Tom, surrounded by prostitutes and clearly drunk, sprawls on a chair with his foot on the table; one young woman embraces him and steals his watch, another spits a stream of gin across the table to the amusement of a young black woman standing in the background; one woman drinks from the punchbowl; another is removing her clothes in order to perform “postures”; to the right, a harpist and a door through which enters a man holding a large dish and a candle, and a pregnant ballad singer holding a sheet lettered “Black Joke”; on the walls hang a map of the world to which a young woman holds a candle and framed prints of Roman emperors, all (except that of Nero) damaged. A second version of the paintings is at the Atkins Museum (Kansas City, Missouri).

  • Title: Revelling with harlots [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.03+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

Country sport

Print shows a man and a boy chasing a pig in the yard of a country alehouse. In the background, another man pauses to remove his hat and wipe his brow, while a fourth has evidently tripped and lies sprawling on the ground. A dog barks at the commotion.

  • Title: Country sport [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record 

812.00.00.114

Acquired September 2019

Collection of 20 British inn bills, [circa 1780]-1841

collection of twenty engraved and letterpress British inn bills completed in manuscript in various hands from regions throughout England and Wales, dating between circa 1780 and 1841. Many are printed with menus listing food and drinks as well as services, providing insight into what travellers at the end of the Georgian era were offered in any given region in this period; they are also early examples of the growing tourism trade. Beside tea, coffee, milk, soda water, lemonade, cider (cyder), and a wide range of spirits, other options for speciality drinks include: negus, punch, Geneva, perry, and malt liquors. Many of the various services relate to the care and maintenance of horses and carriages; besides blacksmithing, farrier and saddling services, many of the inns offered hay and corn, rush lights, etc. Also on offer were “servant’s eating and ale”, beds with extra charges for “fires in a bed chamber”, and washing; other services listed included “Chaise hire”, servants, providers were sometimes available. Other common services and goods included writing materials, postage, tobacco, and, of course, meals with various foods like fruit listed separately. The printed invoices and menus include some with engraved designs or woodcuts that incorporate a representation of a local attraction or motifs indicative of the trade. Several of the bills also include the imprint of the provincial printer. The majority have manuscript annotations.
Two invoices from Welsh business are produced by “Watton, Printer, Shrewsbury Chronicle” for Bedd Gelert Hotel, Carnarvonshire A. Prichard and Harod Arms Hotel, Devil’s Bridge, a village and community in Ceredigion, Wales, both of which are illustrated on the fronts and backs, with the same image on the back: The Iron Suspension Bridge, completed and opened on Monday, Januaray 30th, 1826, over the Menai Strait from Carnarvonshire into Anglesey. The fronts include the advertisements for the individual business but also include other natural wonders of the area: Cataracts and Aber Glaslyb Bridge, the Salmon Leap and the Pass in Snowden.

  • Title: Collection of 20 British inn bills, [circa 1780]-1841.

Catalog Record 

LWL Mss File 147 & LWL Mss File 148

Acquired June 2019

 

 

 

Enthusiasm displayed

Enthusiasm displayed

A Methodist preacher preaching to an open-air congregation with a cloth in one hand, two women preparing to steal a pair of shoes in the midst of the crowd, various people looking on including an apple seller with a cart, two Jews, fashionable ladies and gentlemen, and a group of boys with a guy formed of a chimney brush, an inn to the right and the Palladian facade of St. Luke’s Hospital beyond.

  • Printmaker: Pranker, Robert, printmaker.
  • Title: Enthusiasm displayed [graphic] / John Griffiths pinxit ; Robt. Pranker sculpt.
  • Publication: [London] : Published according to act of Parliament, & sold by the proprietor John Griffiths, Chief Porter of the Middle Temple, opposite the General Post Office, Middle Temple Lane, & the print shops &c., [1765]

Catalog Record 

765.00.00.93++

Acquired April 2019

Modern aquatics

Modern aquatics . Detailed description below.

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped shirts, open at the neck, nautical in cut. They row a lady who sits erect in a grotesquely huge hat, with wide brim, high jam-pot crown, and towering ribbons. They row badly and carelessly. In waterside arbours spectators drink and smoke. On the extreme left steps lead to the water, and two more amateur oarsmen, looking like buccaneers, stand, while a boatman in waders holds the bow of a boat. Behind are urban houses.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern aquatics [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.113+

Acquired October 2018

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having Scratched out of the Club’), or retire, having already done so. Fox and Sheridan wear enormous wigs, the former says, “Brother: Brother: we are all in the wrong” (showing that they are Peachum and Lockit [Like Newcastle and Fox in 1756 (British Museum Satires no. 3371), Burke and Sheridan in 1790 (British Museum Satires no. 7627), Burke and Fox in 1791 (British Museum Satires no. 7856).] in Gay’s ‘Beggar’s Opera’, II. ii). Before Fox is a list with names scored through. Sheridan grasps a bottle of ‘Sherry’. A couple advance together, in the act of hurling their large wigs at the pile; one says, “I will Scratch out my Name in hopes of getting in for the City” (probably Nathaniel Newnham, returned for the City 1784, but defeated in 1790, cf. British Museum Satires no. 7162). The other is perhaps Windham. The only one of the retiring wigless Whigs who is characterized is Burke. All say: “We have erased our Names for ever from the Club, when the Artful & Ambitious designs of a Faction are carried on under a Mask of Prudential Reform & when the leading Members are Notoriously known to Carry on a secret Correspondence with the Avowed Enemies of the Constitution they Affect to Support & Defend it is high time for all prudent & real friends to that Constitution to leave them to their Just Punishment, the Contemp of all true Friends to their King and Constitution.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleA scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern, or, A crack in the Wig Club [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. March 17, 1793, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly … , [17 March 1793]

Catalog Record 

793.03.17.01

Acquired June 2018

Economy

lwlpr33267 (1024x759)

On a hilly rural scene a man in a Northumbrian[?] checkered-plaid over shirt and cap, with bare feet and legs, carries a stave on which are tied his shoes and trousers. The man is followed by a similarly barefooted and barelegged boy carrying waterbottles[?]. They seem to be walking past an inn called the Crown outside which is parked a covered wagon.

  • PrintmakerDavison, William, 1780-1858, printmaker.
  • TitleEconomy [graphic].
  • Publication[Alnwick : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

812.00.00.95

Acquired October 2015