Let us all be unhappy together

“Popular print, satire, after print published by Laurie & Whittle in 1794 (British Museum satires no. 8596): five men sit at a small square table on which are glasses and an empty punch-bowl, all have expressions of deep melancholy: one reverses his glass, another breaks his pipe, the bowl of which still smokes, the third weeps, the fourth looks down with a gesture of deprecating misery, the fifth looking towards the viewer.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Let us all be unhappy together [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record

812.00.00.98

Acquired September 2019

The reconciliation

 

The reconciliation. Detailed description below

“The King steps forward to embrace the Prince of Wales, who throws himself into his father’s arms, saying, “against Heaven – and before thee, and am no more worthy——” (the words fade out). George III wears court dress, the Prince’s dress is tattered and dishevelled, his pocket hangs inside out, the garter at his knee – ‘Honi soit’ – is loose. Behind the King stands the Queen on the door-step, half-smiling, her arms outstretched. Two pleased princesses look over her shoulder. Just outside the door stand Pitt and Moira watching the reconciliation, Pitt with a benign expression, Moira more doubtfully; both wear footmen’s court-livery, of military cut; Moira wears jack-boots. Pitt holds a paper: ‘New Union Act Britains best Hope’, implying that he is the author of the ‘Union’. Moira holds Pitt’s arm. Beside the house (right) are a tree and a balustrade, against which grow a rose-bush and a thistle.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the Gillray print of which this is a copy.
“A close copy by Williams, with additions, apparently ante-dated … Behind the Prince Lord Dartmouth, Lord Chamberlain, stands full face, holding his wand, his gold key attached to his coat. Pitt and Moira turn their eyes slyly towards each other: both weep large burlesqued tears, as do the Queen and Dartmouth.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The reconciliation [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Novr. 18, 1804, by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [18 November 1804]

Catalog Record 

804.11.18.01+

Acquired May 2019

A nautical impromptu

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Satire with two naval officers (one of whom is the Duke of Clarence caricatured, with heavy jowl, protruding lips, and small slanting eye) abusing each other at table, observed by a civilian who winks and holds a finger to the side of his nose. The naval officer on the right says, “Why, they say there is always a fool in every family, & they generally send him to Sea.” The Duke of Clarence in the middle responds, ” How the Devil came you to put into the Navy, Captain.” The civilian to the right, observes, “Britons strike home!!!” On the table are plates of fruit and wine glasses with two carafes one of which is labeled “Goose” and a booklet entitled “An essay on Government by Jordan”. Two pictures on the wall in the background illustrate the theme: on the left, the image shows a man (King George) holds the arm of a crying young cadet, a sword between his legs, carries the title “Win them first then wear them.” On the right, “On board the London” is an image of two officers fighting while two big sailors smile as they watch.

  • Title: A nautical impromptu [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publd. Augt. 22d, 1827, by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, [22 August 1827]

Catalog Record 

827.08.22.01+

Acquired October 2018

The last of the Boroughbridges

“Wetherell (left), an invalid in dressing-gown and night-cap, reclines in an arm-chair, exhausted but laughing. Facing him stands Eldon in deep dejection, saying, with both hands raised, ‘Poor Boroughbridge! how is it with you?’ Cumberland, on the extreme right, stands behind Eldon, covering his face with his handkerchief; he says: ‘Facetious to the last!–It is quite affecting!’ Horace Twiss leans on the back of Wetherell’s chair; Chandos, dressed as a woman, stoops over the patient; both are smiling. Wetherell: ‘All over my friends! just in time to hear my “last speech and dying words”! But dont look so grave about it, I assure you we treat the matter in our house as if it was an excellent joke–to be sent out of the world with a dose of Russell’s purge”! is so droll; & then, we are to have such a merry funeral’. On a commode is a bottle labelled ‘Russell’s purge’. Peel, smiling, and Goulburn, holding a handkerchief to his face and leaning on Peel, watch from the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorDoyle, John, 1797-1868, lithographer.
  • TitleThe last of the Boroughbridges [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • PublicationLondon : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, March 7th, 1831.
  • Manufacture[London] : Printed by C. Motte, 25 Leicester Sqre.

Catalog Record

831.03.07.01+

Acquired March 2018

The last of the Boroughbridges

“Wetherell (left), an invalid in dressing-gown and night-cap, reclines in an arm-chair, exhausted but laughing. Facing him stands Eldon in deep dejection, saying, with both hands raised, ‘Poor Boroughbridge! how is it with you?’ Cumberland, on the extreme right, stands behind Eldon, covering his face with his handkerchief; he says: ‘Facetious to the last!–It is quite affecting!’ Horace Twiss leans on the back of Wetherell’s chair; Chandos, dressed as a woman, stoops over the patient; both are smiling. Wetherell: ‘All over my friends! just in time to hear my “last speech and dying words”! But dont look so grave about it, I assure you we treat the matter in our house as if it was an excellent joke–to be sent out of the world with a dose of Russell’s purge”! is so droll; & then, we are to have such a merry funeral’. On a commode is a bottle labelled ‘Russell’s purge’. Peel, smiling, and Goulburn, holding a handkerchief to his face and leaning on Peel, watch from the background.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the original version of the print.

  • TitleThe last of the Boroughbridges [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S. Gans, Southampton Street, Strand, March 14th, 1831.

Catalog Record 

831.03.14.01+

Acquired March 2018

A Catalanian pic nic society at private rehearsal

Click for larger image

Six members of the society sit in a row, each singing a different song. All are ugly and elderly except one lady who turns to her neighbour singing, “In sweetest harmony we live.” The latter, almost bald, sits on the extreme left, singing, “Time has not thinn’d my flowing hair.” A fat, ugly lady bawls towards her left hand neighbour: “Encompass’d in [an] angels frame.” He sings to her: “Together let us ran[ge] the fields.” A man with closed eyes from which tears fall, sings: “Said a smile to a tear what cause have you hear.” A gouty, old naval officer on the extreme right sings: “Oh exquisite harmony!! Music has charms to soften rocks and bend the knotted oak.” A dishevelled footman with a bottle in his coat-pocket walks from the right, tilting his salver of glasses so that they fall on a squalling cat. He sings tipsily: “From night till morn I take my glass I hopes to forget my Chloe!!” A dog on the left howls.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: A Catalanian pic nic society at private rehearsal [graphic] / Woodward del. ; Cruikshank sp.
  • Published: [London] : Pubd. by T. Tegg, 111 Cheapside, March 12, 1807.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

807.03.14.02+

Acquire April 2013