Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper

description below

A stout man reclines on a chaise-longue; a small cup meets his lips, from which he drinks wine. Above this, a small tube from which cracked nuts descend. On the wall are two wheels and the mechanism which pours and decants the wine, and cracks the nuts.

 

  • Title: Body fanner, nut-cracker & wine helper, for the heats of summer [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Jan. 1, 1830.
  • Manufacture: [London] : Printed by J. Netherclift.

Catalog Record

830.01.01.08+

Acquired November 2020

A capital joke

description belowA group of gentlemen seated at an oval table, with glasses full of wine, laugh uproariously at a joke as they look down at the dog at the foot of the table.

 

  • Title: A capital joke [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pub. Sept. 1823 by J. Dickinson, 114 New Bond St., [September 1823]

Catalog Record

823.09.00.02

Acquired June 2020

The tailor and cobler

A tailor and cobbler, both are partially bald, are seated with their backs to roaring fire in the grate of a fireplace. The cobbler is sitting at a table with a glass and tankard in front of him; he is smoking a pipe and blowing the smoke into the tailor’s face. The tailor sits slumped forward in a state of evident inebriation and his own pipe lies broken on the floor. On the wall behind them is a picture of a man seated under a tree sketching(?) the rural scene in front of him, a church with a steeple in the distance.

  • Title: The tailor and cobler [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record 

812.00.00.115

Acquired September 2019

Let us all be unhappy together

“Popular print, satire, after print published by Laurie & Whittle in 1794 (British Museum satires no. 8596): five men sit at a small square table on which are glasses and an empty punch-bowl, all have expressions of deep melancholy: one reverses his glass, another breaks his pipe, the bowl of which still smokes, the third weeps, the fourth looks down with a gesture of deprecating misery, the fifth looking towards the viewer.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Let us all be unhappy together [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record

812.00.00.98

Acquired September 2019

The smoaking club

description below“Elderly men sit and stand, all smoking long pipes; large clouds of smoke issue from their mouths, but little or nothing comes from the bowls of their pipes. Most sit or stand silently morose; two standing men (left) appear to be puffing smoke in each other’s faces. One leans back, apparently asleep, but smoking. An ugly man seated on the extreme right takes the hand of a pretty young woman who stands opposite him; he holds a large key. She slips a note into the hand of a fierce-looking military officer who stands with his back to her. On the wall (right) is a placard: ‘At a general meeting of this Society, it was resolv’d by a Majority of Independent members, that any member may be Indulg’d with having the Key brought him, by his Servant or hand-maid, but on no pretence whatever be followd by that bane of good fellowship calld the White Sergeant.’ Above the door are framed Rules: ‘Ist No Gemman to be a member of this Society who cannot smoke three pipes at one sitting – NB no Spitting 2d No members pipe to be more than 14 Inches nor less than nine unless permitted so to do by the Landlady 3d Every member to find his own Stopper 4th Any member who puffs designedly in the face of another, to be find sixpence or be puff’d at in return by the whole company 5th All fines to be spent in Porter T. Twig Secy’ On the back wall is a large print of Sir Walter Raleigh seated smoking (right) while a servant raises a bucket to fling at the smoke.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Scott, Edmund, approximately 1746-1810, printmaker.
  • Title: The smoaking club [graphic] / I. Boyne delt. ; E. Scott sculpt.
  • Publication: London : Publish’d 10 Jany. 1792 by Bull & Jeffryes, Ludgate Hill], [10 January 1792]

Catalog Record

792.01.10.03++

Acquired March 2019

The shepherds holyday

see description below“Rural scene with two couples dancing on the left while a man pipes and plays a drum under a tree on the right, and another couple watch at a table in front of him, smoking and drinking; village in the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The shepherds holyday [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published Oct. 24th, 1794, by John Fairburn, map, chart & printseller, No. 146 Minories, London, [24 October 1793]

Catalog Record 

793.10.24.03+

Acquired June 2019

Jubilee Fair

Jubilee Fair. Detailed description below.

“View of the Jubilee Fair in Hyde Park; in foreground to left a small stage erected with a band playing and jesters performing, a small crowd stands in front, a few tents in central foreground with signs such as “Duke of Wellington Whitbreads Intire”, and on a lamp “Dancing and Singing Here”; beyond a crowd stands by river bank watching a sham sea fight, many sailing ships on water with smoke billowing from the scene, on the opposite river bank the fair continues.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Jubilee Fair [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published Sept. 10, 1814, by J. Pitts, No. 14 Great St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials, [10 September 1814]

Catalog Record

814.09.10.01++

Acquired September 2018

A nautical impromptu

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Satire with two naval officers (one of whom is the Duke of Clarence caricatured, with heavy jowl, protruding lips, and small slanting eye) abusing each other at table, observed by a civilian who winks and holds a finger to the side of his nose. The naval officer on the right says, “Why, they say there is always a fool in every family, & they generally send him to Sea.” The Duke of Clarence in the middle responds, ” How the Devil came you to put into the Navy, Captain.” The civilian to the right, observes, “Britons strike home!!!” On the table are plates of fruit and wine glasses with two carafes one of which is labeled “Goose” and a booklet entitled “An essay on Government by Jordan”. Two pictures on the wall in the background illustrate the theme: on the left, the image shows a man (King George) holds the arm of a crying young cadet, a sword between his legs, carries the title “Win them first then wear them.” On the right, “On board the London” is an image of two officers fighting while two big sailors smile as they watch.

  • Title: A nautical impromptu [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publd. Augt. 22d, 1827, by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, [22 August 1827]

Catalog Record 

827.08.22.01+

Acquired October 2018

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having Scratched out of the Club’), or retire, having already done so. Fox and Sheridan wear enormous wigs, the former says, “Brother: Brother: we are all in the wrong” (showing that they are Peachum and Lockit [Like Newcastle and Fox in 1756 (British Museum Satires no. 3371), Burke and Sheridan in 1790 (British Museum Satires no. 7627), Burke and Fox in 1791 (British Museum Satires no. 7856).] in Gay’s ‘Beggar’s Opera’, II. ii). Before Fox is a list with names scored through. Sheridan grasps a bottle of ‘Sherry’. A couple advance together, in the act of hurling their large wigs at the pile; one says, “I will Scratch out my Name in hopes of getting in for the City” (probably Nathaniel Newnham, returned for the City 1784, but defeated in 1790, cf. British Museum Satires no. 7162). The other is perhaps Windham. The only one of the retiring wigless Whigs who is characterized is Burke. All say: “We have erased our Names for ever from the Club, when the Artful & Ambitious designs of a Faction are carried on under a Mask of Prudential Reform & when the leading Members are Notoriously known to Carry on a secret Correspondence with the Avowed Enemies of the Constitution they Affect to Support & Defend it is high time for all prudent & real friends to that Constitution to leave them to their Just Punishment, the Contemp of all true Friends to their King and Constitution.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleA scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern, or, A crack in the Wig Club [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. March 17, 1793, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly … , [17 March 1793]

Catalog Record 

793.03.17.01

Acquired June 2018

Quite politely

Click for larger image

A gentleman in a riding habit (left) rides his horse through the door of a cottage startling the family who sit at their dinner table. The man’s hunting dog jumps at the young son who sits closest to the door; he screams in terror, his fork and knife frozen part way to his mouth and his leg thrown up, spilling a pitcher from the table. The mother raises up her arms in terror, letting the cutlery fly; in her mouth is a gnawed bone. Behind her is a wall with shelves lined with dishes and mugs. Her husband (right), back to the viewer, turns to the intruder pointing a long spear. His knife and fork are on the floor below his chair. The gentleman addresses the cottagers, “Och, dont disturb y’rselves my Nonies I only want to know whether you cou’d be after informing me where I cou’d meet with a decent night’s lodging for man and beast.”

  • Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, artist.
  • Title: Quite politely [drawing].
  • Created: [England], [between 1830 and 1852?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Drawings G761 no. 6 Box123

Acquired November 2013