State of the giraffe

description below

“The King’s giraffe hangs limply from a sling which is suspended from a cross-beam supported on two uprights. George IV and Lady Conyngham push hard at a windlass to hoist up their pet. He has thrown off his coat and rolled up his shirt-sleeves; tight breeches define spherical posteriors. She looks up sentimentally at the animal, whose forelegs are swathed in stockings, with the feet in large shoes stamped with a crown. Beside it is an open chest of stoppered spirit bottles. A background of trees and grass indicates Windsor Park.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: State of the giraffe [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [ca. July 1829]

Catalog Record

829.07.00.05+

January 2020

A political reflection

description below

“George IV as the ‘Great Babe’ lies asleep in his cradle rocked by Lady Conyngham, while Wellington, seated before a pier-glass, places the crown on his own head. The glass reflects the dark emaciated features of British Museum Satires No. 15520. The Duke wears uniform with boots and sword. On a table below the glass the sceptre and orb lie on a cushion. Lady Conyngham, with a towering coiffure as in British Museum Satires No. 15508, croons: Oh slumber my darling | The time may soon come | When thy rest may be broken | By Trumpet & Drum [the last three words in large letters]. The infant sucks a thumb; a gouty foot projects from the coverlet. On the floor is a line of toys: a sailing boat on wheels, a model of Buckingham Palace reconstructed by Nash as in British Museum Satires No. 15668, a giraffe (see British Museum Satires No. 15425), a Life Guard on a toy horse, a Foot-Guard, a dismantled or unfinished ship resting on a prostrate toy soldier. A napkin on a towel-horse (right) indicates a nursery.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A political reflection [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. February 1828]

Catalog Record

828.02.00.05+

Acquired June 2020

The guard wot looks arter the sovereign

description below“Lady Conyngham stands directed to the left, feet apart, dressed as in British Museum satires no. 15720; she amusingly combines the ultra-feminine with masculine attributes and stance. She is immensely fat and wide with small cherubic features and curls; under her left arm is a cocked blunderbuss. She wears a wide-brimmed hat, a neckcloth fastened with a jewelled crown, a coach-guard’s greatcoat, wide open over her tight-waisted dress. A pouch hangs from her shoulder and two coach-horns from her left arm. Above her head: ‘I says to our Governor says I–keep your eye on them ere Leaders George’; i.e. on Lyndhurst and Scarlett, see British Museum satires nos. 15720, 15850. Cf. British Museum satires no. 15716.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The guard wot looks arter the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. April 28, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [28 April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.28.01+

Acquired November 2019

Protestant descendency

<img alt ... />

“An ancient Gothic church in the middle distance stands on a grassy hill inscribed ‘Protestant Ascendency’; under the hill (left) is a cave, ‘Cave of Catholic Ascendency’, in which are barrels of ‘Gun . Pow[der]’. A fat bare-footed friar walks away from the cave towards the picture-plane, carrying a lighted candle, and slyly laying a train of powder on the road to the cave. Standing round the church is a crowd of country people, listening to a parson who holds out to them a ‘Petition to Parliament’. They are unconscious, not only that the ground beneath them is mined, but that men (right) are tugging at a rope looped round the steeple, which is about to crash. The rope-pullers are in the foreground (right); at the extreme end is Wellington with his back to the church, straining hard. Next is Peel, wearing an orange waistcoat (cf. British Museum Satires No. 15690) badly stained by the rope; Brougham, a broom-girl dressed as in British Museum Satires No. 14769, is next, with Mackintosh in Highland costume beside him. In front of them is Burdett, very tall and thin, holding up his hat and shouting ‘Down with it–never mind the People’ [see British Museum Satires No. 16058]. In front is O’Connell, in wig and gown, shouting, ‘By St Patrick I’ve got the Rope over at Last.’ Behind these principals are more men, tugging at a second rope. On a green field topping a cliff behind the church-breakers is Eldon wearing a smock and guiding a plough; he turns to shout to the petitioners by the church, who will be crushed by the falling tower: ‘Look to your selves People.’ Along the horizon (left) is a Papist procession with lighted tapers, the Host, crosses, a grotesque Pope, and figures under a canopy. It approaches St. Paul’s whose dome rises above the sky-line. On the extreme right is the Monument (see British Museum satires no. 15688, &c.) in flames.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Protestant descendency [graphic] : a pull at the Church / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. March 19, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [19 March 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.03.19.01+

Acquired October 2018

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

group of people dancing

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others of the set: one man and two ladies on the left and one lady and two men on the right dance rigidly erect, and watch the central pair with hauteur; the men are dandies, the women slim and fashionable. The duchess has a swirling paradise-plume in her towering loops of hair, above tossing ringlets.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, May 1829.

Catalog Record 

829.05.00.08+

Acquired October 2018

Modern aquatics

Modern aquatics . Detailed description below.

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped shirts, open at the neck, nautical in cut. They row a lady who sits erect in a grotesquely huge hat, with wide brim, high jam-pot crown, and towering ribbons. They row badly and carelessly. In waterside arbours spectators drink and smoke. On the extreme left steps lead to the water, and two more amateur oarsmen, looking like buccaneers, stand, while a boatman in waders holds the bow of a boat. Behind are urban houses.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern aquatics [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.113+

Acquired October 2018

The Devils doings

<img alt ... />

“The Devil (right), in the foreground and much larger than the other figures, stands Asmodeus-like on a house-top (cf. British Museum Satires No. 16160), overturning with a long pole a dinner-table and upsetting the guests who fall on clouds of Dust. He is a grotesque muscular creature with goat’s legs, barbed wings and tail, and looks round with a triumphant grin at the spectator. The guests are also assailed by harpies, little winged men, whose bodies terminate in barbed and scaly tails. One of these (Corder), holding a long bill which rises into the air above him, assails a man (Roach) mounted on a cockroach and holding up a book inscribed Parish Acct; he is The Grand Carver mounted on his Cockroach.; from the cockroach’s antennae hang two big keys, and it emits a tail-blast inscribed We are of the Select, against his assailant. The latter holds out a paper inscribed Majority 7 and says am I not the Elect. Another harpy holding out a constable’s staff flies menacingly towards the cockroach, saying, By St Thomas I cheque this. Roach exclaims: I tell you it’s all a farce so we have taken the liberty to Cribb the Books Keep the Keys tight Cockey. A third harpy threatens the feast with a pair of spurred cavalry boots, saying you will Do-Well to give in, showing he is T. W. Dow (a boot-maker of York Street, Covent Garden. P.O. London Directory, 1822), see British Museum Satires No. 15528. A fourth has seized a paunchy Vestryman by the nose; the victim screams Oh my Nose–Rose Water rose water–oh oh oh– From the table fall birds, hare, tureen, decanter, pineapple, &c. The dust forms a background, and is inscribed Dust for the Eyes of the Parishioners; looming through it is the façade of St. Paul’s, Covent Garden. The bill held by Corder is headed Dinners. The items are Richardson £8-5, Hodgson & Gan £47-11-0, wine 5. 3. 0. Hodgson & Gan[n] Venison feast 30. 3- 6–Dinner on auditing Accounts £11- 4- 0, Hodg & Gann Ditto £40 4-0, Richardson Visitation Din . . £22. 7. 6, Joys St Thomas Day Dinner £20-10-0—&c &c.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The Devils doings, or, The cruel radical harpies destroying a feast [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Eqs. de.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [April 1828]

Catalog Record

828.04.00.02+

Acquired October 2018

Knock and ye shall enter

<img alt ... />

“An archaic iron-studded door, with posts and lintel of solid but ancient oak, represents the door of the ‘COMMONS’ [inscription on lintel]. Above: ‘”They of Rome are enter’d in our Counsels Sh.’ [‘Coriolanus’, I. ii]. An old-clothes’ man stands at the door in profile to the left gazing up at the inscription; he raises the knocker, a ring in the mouth of an angry lion’s head. He is bearded, with an ultra-Jewish profile, and has three hats piled on his own, the topmost being a flaunting feminine erection. He wears a ragged and patched gaberdine, old-fashioned buckled shoes, and carries across his shoulder a large bag, from a hole in which projects a pig’s foot (a pig in his poke). On his back is an open box of trinkets, containing watches. Close behind him stands a turbaned Turk, watching him with eager anxiety. The Jew: ‘Come I sha–Open the door vill ye–I vants to come in–and heres a shentlemans a friend of mines–vants to come in too–dont be afeard–I dont vant a sheat for nothing–I can pay for it So help me Got.’ Three men (safely inside) look down at the applicants from a small open window beside the door (right): a dissenter, holding his hat, and characterized by lank hair and plebeian features (resembling Liston as Maw-Worm, cf. British Museum Satires No. 16943); a Jesuit wearing a biretta, and putting a thumb to his nose, and a fat elderly monk; the last two frown. The left door-post (somewhat cracked) is inscribed: ‘OAK Suppose to be sound Put up 1688 only latly discovered to be full of Skakes[?peare].'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Knock and ye shall enter [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Eq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [ca. June 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.06.00.01+

Acquired October 2018

The man wot drives the sovereign

A satire on the Duke’s pressure on the King to accept Emancipation. Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect.

  • PrintmakerPhillips, John, fl. 1825-1831, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by E. King, Chancery-lane, April 1829.

Catalog Record

829.04.00.14+

Acquired June 2017

The man wot drives the sovereign

“Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect, in contrast with his rival, see British Museum Satires No. 15736.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. April 1829 by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [April 1829]

Catalog Record

829.04.00.15+

Acquired June 2017