La derniere cuvée

description below

“French soldiers are being cooked or drowned in a big round vat built of stone, under which a fire is burning. Blücher (left) and Wellington (right) stand over the vat, holding long-handled perforated ladles with which they skim the surface of the water, fishing out the soldiers. Blücher (left), saying “Mon cher Welington je commence a écumer j’espere que vous me Seconderez,” holds on his level ladle a hussar in large busby, braided tunic, and boots. Wellington holds up on his (tilted) ladle a man hanging head downwards. Beside the vat (right) is a rocky cone from a fissure in which the flames of Hell emerge; Cerberus, a monster with three serpentine necks and webbed wings, reaches from the opening towards Wellington’s captive, and devours his legs with two of his great jaws. Wellington answers: “mon ami Blucher je sais pret a vous suivre mais surtout travaille fort cette nuit.” Other soldiers struggle to get out or sink back hopelessly. An eagle (standard) projects from the water, on which float many tricolour cockades. Wellington’s victim, who has a moustache, is not Napoleon, who is a subordinate figure, struggling to get out, and extending his arms towards Wellington.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title: La derniere cuvée [graphic].
  • Publication: A Londre [i.e. France?] : [publisher not identified], 1815.

Catalog Record

815.07.00.01+

Acquired May 2020

Le plan de campagne de 1806

description below

A French satire on the British administration, who are gathered around a table with bottles and glasses (two of which are toppled over) and a battle plan (’Plan de Berlin’) drawn on the tablecloth. In1806, French forces under Napoleon occupied Prussia, pursued the remnants of the shattered Prussian Army, and captured Berlin.

 

  • Title: Le plan de campagne de 1806, ou, Les deliberations des politiques anglais sur la guere [graphic].
  • Publication: A Paris : Chez Martinet, [1806]

Catalog Record

806.00.00.54+

Acquired May 2020

Napoleon

Napoleon

An anti-Napoleon broadside including an engraved, cartographic bust of Napoleon above two columns of letterpress in Dutch, German, English and French. The face of Napoleon is formed of carcases of war victims: on the collar are waves of the sea; a “hand” is placed as the epaulet while on the cuff is ‘R’ (for Regent), round the wrist ‘Honi Soit ‘, on the fingers are the letters ‘A’, ‘R’, ‘P’, ‘S’, ‘E’ (for the Allies). A drawing the Rhenish Confedracy [sic] under the flimsy symbol of the cobweb: and the “spider” is a symbolic emblem of the vigilance of the Allies.

 

  • Title: Napoleon [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1814?]

Catalog Record

814.00.00.42+

Acquired June 2019

A pair of specticals

A pair of specticals

Political satire: With billows of smole behind it, a skeleton holding a noose and pointing to his eye dances to the left of Napoleon who stands pointing at it. In the right background is a gallows with a group of soliders standing in the distance below.

Mounted on a former album leaf; newspaper clippings dating from 1817 and 1818 are pasted on verso of mount covering a range of topics including: small pox, post horse duties, poor rate, three cases of debtors, two work related accidents, and a short humorous piece on the streets of Paris and the price of wine.

  • Title: A pair of specticals [sic] easely seen through [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. 17 June 1813 by T. Tegg, Cheapside, London, [17 June 1813]

Catalog Record 

813.06.17.01+

Acquired March 2019

Modern plays

Modern plays

Four scenes in one plate, each with a separate title; the subjects are Napoleon’s defeat in Russia, the Prince Regent, a domestic scenes, each characterised by a disaster, the first shows a man in a bedroom beside a coffin, dancing, and last, a man on the floor being beaten by his wife after upsetting the tea table (shown with two demons)

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern plays [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1815]

Catalog Record 

815.00.00.17+

Acquired October 2018

 

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

“Three allied generals (left) hold the long handle of a shovel (peel) on which is a dish containing a tiny Napoleon. This they try to push into a baker’s oven, but are hindered by the Austrian emperor, who holds the door of the oven, feigning to be trying to open it, but actually holding it at an angle which prevents the entry of the dish. The leading baker is Blücher, wearing an apron over his uniform, and without a hat; he looks sternly at Francis, saying, “Pull away Frank! you Keep us waiting!” General Mikhail Woronzoff, young and handsome, immediately behind Blücher, pushes hard, saying, “In with it Blücher.” On the extreme left is Bernadotte, one hand on Woronzoff’s shoulder, saying, “I tell you what, Woronzow, the Hinges want a little Russia Oil.” Francis I, who like the others wears uniform with jack-boots, but has (baker’s) over-sleeves to the elbow, says with an expression of startled alarm: “This door Sticks! I dont think I shall get it open?!” A weathercock surmounts his cocked hat. Wellington comes up (right), poking him in the back with his baker’s tray on which are two pies. He says: “Shove alltogather [sic] Gentlemen! D-me shove door & all in!” His two pies are ‘Soult Pie’, with two spurred jack-booted legs projecting through the crust, and a pie with spires and other buildings, with a flag inscribed ‘Bourdeaux’. He wears an apron and the order of the Golden Fleece as well as the star of the Garter. A fat, grotesque Dutchman sits on a flat cushion gazing up at the oven; he holds, but does not use, a pair of bellows. In his conical hat is a tobacco-pipe. The fire under the oven is filled with broken eagles and fragments of weapons. Among the debris in the recess for ashes is a crown. Above the oven is the inscription ‘Allied Oven’ surmounted by a crown and cross-bones. In the shadow formed by the half-open door, a skull (Death) waits to receive Napoleon, who lies on his back, kicking violently, and shouting “Murder! Murder!!”; he wears a large plumed bicorne. The stone wall in which the oven is built forms the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole [graphic] / G.H. ivt. ; Gruikshank [sic] fect.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 1st, 1814, by H. Humphrey, St. James St., [1 April 1814]

Catalog Record 

814.04.01.02+

Acquired June 2018

The hero’s return

The hero's return

“A scene in the Empress’s dressing-room. Marie Louise is horror-struck at the appearance of Napoleon who advances towards her in profile astride the back of a crawling Mameluke; he is held up by two other Mamelukes who support his arms and shoulders. He is terribly emaciated and appears moribund. He wears uniform; his legs, feet, and hands are swathed in bandages, his (former) ear and nose covered with black patches. The crawling Mameluke, presumably Roustan, holds out a bottle containing a pointed nose, and labelled ‘Le Nez de l’Empereur’. Immediately behind Napoleon and his three supporters are two kneeling Mamelukes, each reverently holding a tasselled cushion supporting a bottle; one being labelled ‘Les Doights [sic] de l’Empereur Napole . . .’, the other, ‘Les Oreilles de l’Empereur Napoleon’. Behind them (left) another Mameluke advances with a bottle labelled ‘Les Doights du pied de l Empereur Bon . . .’ The Mamelukes wear Turkish dress with turbans. Napoleon looks in tragic silence at his wife, who is seated in regal state but turns aside weeping with violent gestures of despair. A small terrestrial globe decorates her chair; her foot rests on a stool in the form of a flattened polar hemisphere on which the word ‘Brit[ain]’ is visible. Over her low-cut dress is an ermine-bordered robe clasped with a fleur-de-lis. She is supported by an emaciated court-lady, with a patched face, proffering a smelling-bottle, whose profile and a small crown show that she is one of Napoleon’s sisters; two other ladies, wearing crowns, stand behind the Empress, registering consternation. A less conspicuous lady weeps. On the Empress’s right kneels the Governess of the King of Rome, Mme de Montesquiou, holding the screaming child, and weeping noisily. He registers angry terror at the sight of his father; his little crown has fallen off. His features, though fore-shortened and distorted, resemble those of his father, cf. British Museum Satires No. 11719. He wears an ermine-trimmed robe over his childish tunic and breeches. Behind the Governess is a draped dressing-table, the drapery decorated by a large fleur-de-lis, and the toilet boxes ornamented with crowns. A terrified monkey climbs up the mirror, clutching at the crown which surmounts it, and looking over its shoulder at the shocking spectacle presented by the Emperor. On the extreme right a lap-dog stands on a cushion barking furiously at Napoleon. On the ground on the extreme left are two large round coffers, one inscribed ‘Coffre Pour la Bijoutère [sic] Russe’, the other expectantly open. Voluminous draperies on the left and right, supported on the right by a pillar add to the regal character of the room.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe hero’s return [graphic] / David pinxit ; etched by G. Cruikshank.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey, St. James’s St., Feby. 22d, 1813.

Catalog Record

813.02.22.01+

Acquired June 2018

The Corsican whipping top in full spin!!!

The Corsican whipping top in full spin!!!

“A (tricolour) top with the head of Napoleon spins, above the ground, savagely lashed by representatives of the Allies. His arms and his legs have already been severed from his body, now represented only by the madly spinning top. The most violently active is Blücher (left) stripped to the shirt, his coat and hat thrown on a drum on the extreme left, beside which lie his gloves and baton. Facing them is Wellington (right) equally effective, stern, but less savage. Full-face, and immediately behind the top is the Tsar, left hand on hip; his whip is inscribed ‘Knout’. Between him and Wellington is Schwarzenberg (or Francis I). Bernadotte stands rather behind, between Blücher and Alexander, both hands on his hips; he holds a whip but is an amused spectator. Behind (right) the future King of Holland, crowned and wearing a star, but dressed in the breeches and jacket of the Dutchman in English caricature, sits under a tree on a cask of ‘Hollands’. He watches delightedly, holding up one of Napoleon’s legs inscribed ‘United Netherlands’. The other leg, the thigh inscribed ‘Swisslad, the boot Italy, lies near Blücher. At Wellington’s feet is the right arm inscribed Spain & Portugal’; the left arm, inscribed ‘Germany’, is near Schwarzenberg. Napoleon’s orb and (broken) sceptre lie near him, with some of the feathers from the large hat which is still on his head; his horrified and shrieking profile faces Blücher. In the background (left) is a road along which a carriage drives off, drawn by four galloping horses. It contains tiny figures: Marie Louise, crowned and looking behind her, and the little King of Rome also crowned and waving a sceptre. Two soldiers are on the box, two others sit behind. In the air behind Bernadotte a demon flies off to the left, with Joseph Bonaparte clutching his barbed tail. The latter, his crown flying off, looks back horrified, exclaiming “O! My poor Brother Nap oh oh! O!”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title:T he Corsican whipping top in full spin!!! [graphic] / G.H. invt. ; G. Cruikshank fect.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 11th, 1814, by H. Humphrey, St. James’s Strt., [11 April 1814]

Catalog Record

814.04.11.01+

Acquired June 2018

A Gallic idol

“A symbolical bust of Napoleon, dressed as a Roman emperor, is on a rectangular base on which are title and inscription : ‘Symbolical of the Effects produced by that Cause which the enlightened (Fox) [Depicted] in ye Eighteenth Century sagaciously predicted would ultimately prove a Stupendous Monument of Human Wisdom!!!’ The head is turned in profile to the left.; the features are conventional but express ferocity, with glaring eye and fierce frown. It wears a fantastic helmet wreathed with laurel from which blood drips. The wreath is entwined by serpents, whose (three) heads are clustered at the back with words in large letters issuing from their jaws: ‘Rapine’, ‘Lust’, ‘Murder’. The word ‘Invasion’ issues in the same manner from the mouth. Above the wreath the helmet is encircled by a band on which are quasi-zodiacal signs: a scorpion, a sickle, a crescent, an arrow, a caduceus, a goat-like monster. On the helmet sits a grinning Devil, playing a fiddle and spreading his webbed wings over the idol‘s head, while from under one wing Death, a skeleton, peers out; he holds a javelin poised to strike and a cup of poison inscribed ‘Jaffa’ [see British Museum Satires No. 10063]. The shoulders are covered by drapery, drawn aside to reveal (rotten) ribs and a torn and bleeding heart which is transfixed by a dagger and a barbed spear. A scroll floats from the dagger inscribed ‘Wilsons Narrative’; the spear has a scroll inscribed ‘British Press’ and is surmounted by a cap of Liberty. Fragments torn from the heart are inscribed ‘Acre’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9412], ‘Egypt’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9250, &c], and ‘Irel[and]’, while in the middle of the heart is a triangular patch: ‘England’. The heart is surmounted by a crown made of blood-stained daggers with a central fleur-de-lis.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerBarth, J. S., printmaker.
  • TitleA Gallic idol [graphic] / J. Boyne del. ; J. Barth sc.
  • PublicationLondon : Published by R. Cribb, 20 Augt. 1803.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

803.08.20.01+

Acquired October 2016

 

An hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe

lwlpr34233_m-1024x612

“Three symmetrically prancing lions (left) and Napoleon (right) as ‘The Beast’ face each other across a narrow channel. In the background (left) John Bull, an obese citizen, sits surrounded by casks and bales (one marked ‘I’ or ‘L M’) under the Tree of the ‘Constitution’. This has three branches: in the uppermost is a royal crown, the others (presumably) represent the Lords and Commons, … Behind him are symbols of industry: men reaping, a bee-hive, a thatched farm-house. Above the tree flies an angel with a flaming sword … Napoleon’s head is scarcely caricatured, but has two horns – on one is poised an imperial crown, on the other the Papal tiara. In his dragon’s claws he holds up a dagger and three short chains (for the lions); he is branded ‘666’, and his tail is triply barbed. He has webbed wings, scaly shoulders, and a tiger-like body. Under his feet are broken fragments of crowns, sceptres, and crosiers. … In the background (right) two demons fly above a breaking staff surmounted with the cap of liberty; at its feet lies a man in chains. A firing squad aims at women and children; buildings are in flames. The (printed) ‘Explanation: ‘JOHN BULL is sitting under his favourite Oak, supported by Commerce and Industry reaping the Fruits of his Labors, and protected by the power of God, whilst France is enslaved under their Tree of Liberty, which is falling to the Ground – the Honors and Independence of Nations are broken and trampled underfoot, and all the Horrors of War are extending their Ravages with unremitting fury. – Bonaparte is considered as the Dragon, the Beast, and the false Prophet, Rev. xvi. 13, xiii. II, and following verses, xix. 20 – and also as Gog, Ezek. xxxviii. and xxxix. – His brutal and ferocious Dispositions are represented by the Body and Feet of a Tyger; his inordinate Desires, by the Chest, Wings, and Claws of a Dragon, holding out Death or Slavery; his Head with two Horns represents his civil and ecclesiastical Authority; and is intended to point out, that though a Dragon and a Tyger have been the most dreadful and destructive of all real and imaginary Creatures, yet even their horrid Natures are surpassed by the sanguinary and rapacious Dispositions of that implacable Tyrant. – The THREE LIONS represent the united Naval, Regular and Volunteer Force of England, Scotland, and Ireland, watching the Monster’s Motions, and springing forth eager to meet him.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleAn hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe, for 1804 [graphic] / I.[?]M.
  • Publication[London : Printed by C. Stower, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, for the “Prophetic mirror, or A hint to England” by L. Mayer, 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.00.00.19+

Acquired May 2016