A game at chess

description below“Bonaparte (left) and Cornwallis play chess. Bonaparte, not caricatured, alert and military, wearing his large plumed cocked hat, leans forward, pointing to his move; his left arm lies on the table and in his left hand is his sheathed sabre. He says: “Check to your King, remember it is not the first time, and I think a very few Manœuvres more will completely convince you that I am better acquainted with the Game I am playing than you are aware of.” Cornwallis, plump and civilian despite his regimentals and profession, sits without a hat, scratching his head apprehensively. He says: “Curse it I shall lose this Game; You are too much for me.” He wears his ribbon and star, ‘Honi soit’ on his garter. The chairs are symbolical: that of Bonaparte has ormolu laurel wreaths, the legs are formed of fasces and axes; that of Cornwallis, with plain oval back, suggests an English drawing-room.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Author: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: A game at chess [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Jany. 9th, 1802, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [9 January 1802]

Catalog Record

802.01.09.01+

Acquired September 2020

Britannia correcting an unruly boy

description below

“Britannia, tall and powerful, holds Napoleon across her knee, and raises a birch rod to thrash his bleeding posterior. She wears Roman draperies, with corslet and plumed helmet. The rod is tied with a ribbon inscribed: ‘United Kingdoms’. She says: “There take that and that and that, and be carefull not to provoke my Anger more.” He exclaims: “oh forgive me this time and I never will do so again, oh dear! oh dear! you’ll entirely spoil the Honors of the Sitting.” Beside Britannia (left) are her spear and sword; beside Napoleon (right) his huge cocked hat and sabre. The scene is by the sea (left), with a fleet of retreating vessels flying the tricolour flag. On the right is a cliff on which a small British lion lies on a scroll inscribed: ‘Qui uti scit ei bona’ [good things to him who knows how to use them].”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Britannia correcting an unruly boy [graphic] / T. West delt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. June 13th, 1803, by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [13 June 1803]

Catalog Record

803.06.13.01+

Acquired January 2021

Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador

description below

“Napoleon (right) stands between two Russians; one (left) he strikes on the chin with his fist, saying, “There Sir take that, and tel your Master, I’ll thras every one who dares to speak to me I’ll thrash all the World D -me I’ll, I’ll I,’ll be King of the Universe.” The injured Russian stares, saying, “Why this is club Law; this is the Argument of force indeed the little Gentleman is Dêrangé.” Behind Napoleon (right) an officer in fur cloak and hussar’s cap watches with indignation, saying, “The Monarch I represent, will return this insult with becoming dignity.” On the left John Bull, jovial and grossly fat, and wearing top-boots, puts his arm across the shoulders of a pugilist, and points to Napoleon, saying, “There my Boy is an Ambassador who will treat with you in your own way, but I say be as gentle with him as you can.” The good-looking brawny pugilist, who is stripped to the waist, clenches his fists, saying, “what! is it that little Whipper snapper I am to set too with why I think the first round will settle his hash.” [An early use of this phrase which disproves Partridge, ‘Slang Dict., tracing it in England to 1825, and in U.S.A. to 1807, suggesting that the English may have learnt it in the war of 1812. It was clearly current in England by 1803] Bonaparte is small and youthful, caricatured chiefly by the disproportionate size of cocked hat and sabre.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Author: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Olympic games, or, John Bull introducing his new ambassador to the Grand Consul [graphic] / Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, London, June 16, 1803.

Catalog Record

803.06.16.02+

Acquired January 2021

Dramatic effect, or, The death of Genl. Duroc

description below

“The interior of a tent. Duroc, in his shirt, lies supported by a soldier on a wooden bed, while Napoleon (right) holds his right hand, turning away (to the right) and covering his face with his left hand. An officer stands solicitously beside the Emperor, supporting his left elbow. Another officer stands (left) behind the head of the low bed. On the extreme left a soldier bends over a table compounding medicaments. Duroc’s coat and sword lie on a camp-stool, beside his hat and boots. A glimpse of the distant camp is seen on the extreme right, where a Mameluke stands by the tent holding Napoleon’s horse. Duroc is addressing the Emperor, with his left arm extended. Their words are etched below the title: “Duroc, “My whole life has been consecrated to your service, nor do I regret its loss, but for the use it still might have been of to your Buonaparte, “Duroc!” there is a life to come; it is there you are going to wait for me, and where we shall one day meet again!” Duroc, “Yes Sire! but that will not be these thirty years, when you will have triumphed over your enimies [sic], and realised all the hopes of your country, I have lived an honest man: I have nothing to reproach myself with, ah! Sire! go away this sight gives you pain–Be, “Farewell then my friend”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Dramatic effect, or, The death of Genl. Duroc [graphic] : vide French Bulletin.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. June 9th, 1813, by Wm. Holland, No. 11 Cockspur Street, [9 June 1813]

Catalog Record

813.06.09.01

Acquired November 2020

The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford

description below

“A satire on the approaching election for the Chancellorship of Oxford University. Grenville, dressed as a cardinal, heads a small procession towards the Devil, who wears a robe on which is a large cross, and holds the bland mask with which he has been hiding his face. Grenville, bowing low, and deferentially holding his large hat, holds out a paper: Catholic Petition for the vacant Chancellorship with a Plan for Erecting a New Popish Sanhedrim on the ruins of old Alma-Mater, The Devil says: Well done my Children! This is all the Convocation I would have; in his left hand is a pitchfork. The Marquis of Buckingham, dressed as a Jesuit, stands behind him, one hand on his shoulder, the other holding his barbed tail. Beside him is Canning (unrecognizable) wearing a Jesuit’s biretta. Beside the Devil is a greyhound with the head of Grey, its collar inscribed Popish Gray Hound. Immediately behind Grenville walks the Pope, wearing his tiara, and holding his cross; he holds up Grenville’s robe on which is a large cross. Napoleon crouches behind the Pope, holding on to his robes and hiding under his mantle. He wears a crown, with uniform and spurred boots; his hand is on the hilt of his sword. Behind walk together Temple, enormously fat and dressed as a monk, and his brother, Lord George Grenville, similarly dressed. The former carries the Host, the latter a lighted candle. In the background rows of bishops and clergymen face the procession. Bishops in the front row, humbly sweeping the ground with their mitres, bow low, each clasping a Mass Book, while those behind cheer with raised mortar-board, hand, or Mass Book. On five of the books are the names of bishoprics: York [Vernon], St Asaph [Cleaver], London [Randolph], Oxford [Moss], Norwich [Bathurst]. Above the design (and the bishops): Golgotha, i.e: the place of Skulls.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The introduction of the Pope to the Convocation at Oxford by the Cardinal Broad-bottom [graphic] / Js. Gillray fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Publishd. by H. Humphrey, 27 St. James Street, London, Decr. 1st, 1809.

Catalog Record 

809.12.01.04+

Acquired January 2020

The valley of the shadow of death

description below

“Napoleon, advancing down a gently sloping causeway of rock which traverses water and flames, is halted by ‘Leo Britannicus’ who bounds savagely towards him. He drops a short chain attached to the nose of the ‘Russian Bear’, a huge white creature at his heels. He is beset on all sides by monsters, who emerge from a background of flame, smoke, and cloud, or from the water. Beside the British Lion is a little ‘Sicilian Terrier’, barking ferociously. Death, a skeleton-like corpse, rides a mule which dashes through the air towards Napoleon, snorting flame. He wears a Spanish hat and cloak, and holds up a flaming spear and an hour-glass whose sands have almost run out. The mule’s trappings are inscribed ‘True-Royal-Spanish-Breed’. Outstripping the mule, a savage ‘Portuguese Wolf’, with the end of a broken chain attached to his collar, leaps towards Napoleon. The heads and hulders of two melancholy French officers with their necks chained together emerge from clouds to address Napoleon; they say: “Remember Junot and Remember Dupont.” Above these is the Pope’s tiara, the apex of flames, emitting thunderbolts towards Napoleon, and inscribed ‘Dreadful Descent of ye Roman Meteor’ [cf. BMSat 10970]. Immediately above Napoleon is a crescent moon inscribed ‘British-influence’ enclosing the old (dark) moon, which is ‘French Influence’. This forms the centre of a turban, and is surrounded with fiery clouds flanking the features of the Sultan, looking fiercely down at Napoleon. Blood drips from it. This is ‘The Turkish New-Moon, Rising in Blood’. Beside it (right) the head and arms of a man raising an enormous sword above Napoleon emerge from swirling flames: The ‘Spirit of Charles ye XII’ [of Sweden 1682-1718]. On the r. a double-headed Habsburg eagle swoops towards Napoleon from clouds: “- The Imperial Eagle emerging from a Cloud.” Its collar is inscribed ‘German Eagle’. From the water beyond Napoleon’s causeway, the ‘Ditch of Styx’, project the crown and hands of the drowning ‘Rex Joseph’; he is immediately under the Spanish mule ridden by Death. The water on the nearer side of the causeway, in the foreground, is the ‘Lethean Ditch’. From this (left) rats crawl towards Napoleon: “The Rhenish Confederation of Starved Rats, crawling out of the Mud [cf. British Museum Satires No. 10433].” Three frogs raise their heads from the ditch to spit: “Dutch-Frogs spitting out their spite.” A rattle-snake spits venom, and shakes its tail: “- American Rattle-Snake shaking his Tail.-” On the right, standing on a rock, is a dilapidated eagle with clipped wings, and scanty feathers: “Prussian Scare-Crow attempting to Fly -.””–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The valley of the shadow of death [graphic] / Js. Gillray invt. & ft.
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d Septr. 24th, 1808, by H. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, London, [24 September 1808]

Catalog Record

808.09.24.01+

Acquired January 2020

Perusing the state papers

description text

“Napoleon, John Bull (a ‘cit’), a British general wearing a star, and the Duke of Portland sit in conference, each holding a large double paper covered with type or script. Napoleon sits on the left, pointing to the text of his paper and saying to his neighbour, “You see Mr Bull the case is simply this If you do so, I’ll do so!” John, much disconcerted, stares at the Emperor, exclaiming “O! O!” The general also looks at Napoleon, perturbed. Portland (right), who sits in an armchair facing the Emperor, with frank dismay says: “If he says O! O! I’m afraid t’is but so! so!”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Perusing the state papers, or, Sounding the opinions of John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], March 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.00.04+

Acquired November 2020

The grand coronation procession of Napoleone the 1st

description below

“Napoleon and Josephine are in the centre of an elaborate processional design. Individuals and groups are identified by eleven captions in the lower margin. The background is formed of close ranks of French soldiers, with a forest of caps, spears, pikes, and banners receding in perspective. The front row, facing the procession, are grenadiers at attention with bayoneted muskets, the letter ‘N’ in front of their bearskins. They are in shadow; those behind Napoleon are obscured by dense clouds of smoke from a censer; next them (l.) grenadiers blow trumpets and French horns. The procession is led, as by a drum-major, by the posturing and theatrical figure of ‘His Imperial Highness Prince Louis-Buonaparte Marbœuf – High Constable of the Empire’ [Marbeuf was his godfather] on the extreme right. He wears tight-fitting archaic dress, with a feathered coronet, a cloak trailing from one shoulder, buskins, and sabre. He carries a tall staff surmounted by a fleur-de-lis. Next come ‘The Three Imperial Graces, viz. Thier Imp. Highs Princess Borghese [Pauline], Princess. Louis (cher amie of ye Emperor) & Princess Joseph-Bonaparte’ [Hortense and Julie] – three slim young women, very scantily draped, scatter roses. All wear feathered coronets with long snaky curls on their shoulders; they resemble the sisters of Napoleon in BMSat 10072. The ground (l. to r.) is strewn with the flowers they have scattered. Next walks ‘Madame Talleyrand (ci devant Mrs Halhead the Prophetess conducting the Heir Apparent in ye Path of Glory’. A grossly fat woman leads by the hand the little Napoleon-Charles, son of Louis (b. 10 Oct. 1802). The child goose-steps arrogantly, holding out a sceptre in his left hand. He is dressed much like his father, but with the addition of a ribbon and star. Mme Talleyrand wears a feathered coronet and an enormous nosegay; she holds a fan on which is a goat. This, and her patched face, indicate her dissolute past. Slightly behind her, and on her right., hobbles ‘Talleyrand-Perigord. – Prime Minister & King at Arms bearing the Emperor’s Geneology.’ He is burlesqued, with a ‘cheese-cutter’ shin, and a r. foot supported by blocks under the shoe. On his left. shoulder he carries a framed genealogical tree, and hung to his person are crests and symbols in rectangular frames. Napoleon’s family tree issues from ‘Buone Butcher’ and, passing through ‘Buone Cuckold’, terminates in ‘Napoleone Emperor’, which is crowned. The collateral branches are illegible, but one is followed by ‘Hang’d’. …”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The grand coronation procession of Napoleone the 1st, Emperor of France, from the church of Notre-Dame, Decr. 2d, 1804 [graphic] / Js. Gillray invt. & fect.
  • Publication: London : Publish’d Jany. 1st, 1805, by H. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, [1 January 1805]

Catalog Record

Drawer 805.01.01.06

Acquired January 2020

Tant va la cruche à l’eau qu’enfin elle se brise

description below

“By the efforts of Pitt, who directs Addington, and of a jester wearing cap and bells, an earthenware jug representing George III is lowered into the sea and fatally damaged by striking a rock inscribed ‘Malte’. ‘Addington’ is a man of straw (his body formed of a bundle of straw), a puppet attached to a pole placarded with his name; Pitt (left) pulls threads attached to the dangling arms and legs, but looks round horrified at the disaster resulting from his machinations. The jester crouches on a rock (right); under his foot is a document: ‘Traité d’Amiens’ [see British Musueum Satires No. 9852, &c.]; he holds in both hands the rope, lowering the royal pitcher, but the other end of the rope is round Addington’s hand and thus is manipulated by Pitt. Malta is a small castellated island with a church and a sharp rock which has gashed the pitcher just where it is decorated with a dog-like lion from whose head a crown falls. The mouth of the pitcher is a profile portrait of George III crowned, and looking down with angry dismay at the fatal rock.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title:Tant va la cruche à l’eau qu’enfin elle se brise [graphic].
  • Publication:A Paris : Chez Martinet, Rue du Coq, Saint Honoré, [ca. May 1803]

Catalog Record

803.05.00.01+

Acquired May 2020