Mr. John Bull in a quandary

description below

An unfinished sketch for the engraving which appeared in the November 1845 issue of “George Cruikshank’s Table-book,” illustrating a brief article on railroad speculation by the periodical’s editor, Gilbert Abbott a Beckett. John Bull is beset by lilliputian tormentors who are removing all his cash, clothing, and possessions, beneath clouds of steam and a clanging bell.

 

  • Artist: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, artist.
  • Title: Mr. John Bull in a quandary, or, The anticipated effects of the railway calls [art original].
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1845]

Catalog Record

Drawings C889 no. 8 Box D115

Acquired July 2020

Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander

“John Bull, blindfold, stands on a massive truncated pillar holding the beam of a pair of scales. In one scale (left), near the ground, Mrs. Clarke sits composedly among a mass of papers, holding one inscribed My dear Dearest Dearest Darling [see British Museum satires no. 11228, &c.]. The others are inscribed: Sandon, Toyne [Tonyn], Dowler, Omeara, Carter, French, Knight, Clavering. In the other scale the Duke of York swings high in the air, and shouts down to three men on the ground: Save me save me Save my Honour [cf. British Museum satires no. 11269]. They haul hard at ropes attached to his scale, which they tilt sideways so that he is in danger of falling out. One, a drink-blotched bishop wearing a mitre, says: Pull away Pull away the Church is in danger; the other two say: Pull away Pull away we lose all our Places, and Pull away pull away we shall lose our Noble Commander. On the pillar Britannia is depicted seated with her shield and lion; she holds the broken staff of a flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by J. Johnstone, 101 Cheapside, April 1809.

Catalog Record

809.04.22.02+

Acquired September 2019

The matrimonial mania

see description belowThe marriages of the Dukes of Clarence, Kent and Cambridge were hastened by the death of Princess Charlotte, and the image reflects the debates of April 15 and 16, 1818, on a provision for the dukes on their marriages. The Duke of Cumberland was included in the financial arrangements.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The matrimonial mania, or, Poor Jonny ridden to death [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. April 1818 by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, [April 1818]

Catalog Record 

818.04.00.01

Acquired June 2019

John Bull’s little darling

John Bull's little darling. Detailed description below.

“Queen Caroline, stout and raddled, with black ringlets, stands full-face and four-square, bending forward as if bowing, with a fixed stare from black beady eyes. She wears the feathered hat (caricatured) of the ‘trial’, and a fur-bordered pelisse. Under her right arm is a rolled document, ‘List of [Addresses’; in her left hand she awkwardly raises her skirts in order to bow. She stands on a grass plot in front of Brandenburgh House. Below the design: … ‘Lo! yonder she walketh in maiden sweetness, with innocence on her mind and modesty in her cheek.– Her hand seeketh employment; her foot delighteth not in gadding abroad.– She is cloathed with neatness; she is fed with temperance; humility and meekness are as a crown of glory circling her head.– Her breast is the mansion of goodness; and therefere [sic] she suspecteth no evil in others.– Decency is in all her words; in her answers are mildness and truth.– Submission and obedience are the lessons of her life; and peace and happiness are her rewards.– Before her steps walketh Prudence; and Virtue attendeth at her right hand. Her eye speaketh softness and love; but discretion with a sceptre sitteth on her brow.– The tongue of the licentious is dumb in her presence; the awe of her virtue keepeth him silent.– Happy Bartolomeo [Bergami]!!! he putteth his heart in her bosom, and receiveth Comfort.– Thus the prudence of her management is an honor to her husband, and he must hear her praise with silent delight.–!!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: John Bull’s little darling [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Jany. 25, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.01.25.02

Acquired March 2019

[John Bull roasted]

[John Bull roasted]. Detailed description below.

A preparatory sketch for an unpublished caricature illustrating a scene in a large Georgian kitchen. In front of the open hearth a bull is roasting on a spit as a large-bottomed man (Grenville) sits beside it basting the meat. The dish beneath it is inscribed ‘Broad bottom dripping pan’. Other dishes around the room are labeled as are the pools of fat in the dripping pan; some legible notes include plum pudding and mock turtle.

  • Artist: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, artist.
  • Title: [John Bull roasted] [art original] / J. Gillray.
  • Production: [England], [ca. 1805]

Catalog Record

Drawings G41 no. 8 Box D300

Acquired November 2018

The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all

The man wots got the whip hand of 'em all. Detailed description below

“A hand printing-press of metal (a Stanhope Press), supported on the stout legs of a man in breeches which seem to belong to a John Bull, puts to flight mere pigmy humans: two flee to the right, one propelled by a kick from a huge buckled shoe; two others have fallen. Two levers or handles serve as arms; one has a hand which grasps a giant pen, the feather entwined with three serpents which spit flame at the departing legs and cocked hat of Wellington, who, kicked into the air, disappears behind the upper right margin of the design. Another pair of legs, with the black stockings and buckled shoes of Eldon, project from the upper left margin; beside them a single leg and a broom indicate the departing Brougham. A second lever supports a print, ‘The Man Wot Drives The Sovereign’, copied from British Museum satires no. 15731; a flame issues from the press, threatening to scorch or destroy the print. The press is topped by a cap of Liberty inscribed ‘Free Press’ and encircled with a wreath. A little demon (a printer’s devil) rushes towards the press from the left, holding up a big ink-ball.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. May 30th, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [30 May 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.05.30.01+

Acquired October 2018

A new game of shuttle cock as played by his Majestys servants

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“Ministers and others strike at a shuttlecock above their heads inscribed ‘Speakers Warrant’; among the feathers sits a little man holding a crowned staff; he says: “Curse this game I dont Like it I never experienced Such boning about in my life, I wonder when you will have done”; he is Colman the Serjeant-at-Arms. Eldon, in his Chancellor’s wig and gown and holding the Purse of the Great Seal, is the centre of a close group; he says: “Dont knock it here we have not power to Strike it”. Perceval, in back view, wears his Chancellor of the Exchequer’s gown and holds a document inscribed ‘Majority’; he says: “Curse the thing I wish I had never Seen it away with it”. A second judge whose head is partly visible behind Eldon is probably Ellenborough. On the right is Gibbs, holding a paper inscribed ‘Attorn[ey Gen]eral’. He says: “D-n it Ill hit it as Hard as I can tho I’m almost afraid to meddle with it”. There are two others in the group, one is silent, the other resembles Canning (not in the Ministry); he says: “Sure honey Right or wrong I always stick to the Strongest Side so do let me have a Slap at it”. The sturdiest striker stands in back view on the left, with a paper inscribed ‘Read Bow Street’ projecting from his pocket; he says: “I cant Read it Die Veneris! why its Spanish to me we dont understand Them there warrants”. On the extreme left stands the Speaker, Abbot, with a bat inscribed ‘Double’; he says: “Dont Strike it to me again Ill have nothing more to do with it I’ve sent it to Bow Street”. The bats used are not the usual long-handled battledores as (e.g.) in British Museum Satires No. 9716, but short-handled wooden bats. Above the design: ‘NB The Feathers of the Shuttle Cock were pluked [sic] from a Sumersetshire Goose’ [Lethbridge, see British Museum satires no. 11538].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A new game of shuttle cock as played by his Majestys servants for the mausement [sic] of John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. 22 Apl. 1810 by Fores, Picadilli [sic], [22 April 1810]

Catalog Record 

810.04.22.01+

Acquired October 2018

Iohn Bull peeping into futurity

Iohn Bull peeping into futurity

John Bull kneels beside a young gentlemen in a red cloak holding a magnifying glass and a stick, looking towards a cloud within which the future is foretold. It depicts John Bull in seven different scenarios: drinking unadulterated porter, free from taxes, smoking Trinidad tobacco, talking French & grown quite a fine gentleman, eating cinnamon from Ceylon, free from care, and with bread at 6d the quarter loaf. John Bull says: ‘what be all those people I see. Mercy on us so many good things will be more than I can bear’. His companion replies: ‘Look through this glass Mr. Bull & behold your future prosperity, it magnifies but very little I assure you’.

  • PrintmakerRoberts, Piercy, active 1791-1805, printmaker.
  • TitleIohn Bull peeping into futurity [graphic] / Woodward delin. ; etch’d by Roberts.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by P. Roberts, 28 Middle Row, Holborn, [between 1801 and 1803?]

Catalog Record

801.00.00.23

Acquired May 2018

The hopes of the nation

“A satirical emblematic design; at centre, ‘The Rock of the True Old English Constitution’, on which sits a small figure of John Bull on a chair, holding a tankard and a pipe, saying, ‘Wellhere I am I John Bull – thrown rather in the back ground this is the blessed effect of parties their pockets are full, and mine are empty. – however – Grievings a Folly so let us be be [sic] jolly – My Service to you.’ To left stands a large grinning figure, ‘Opposition Man’, his hands in his pockets, with papers lettered ‘Jobbing’, ‘Corruption’, and with sums of money; at right stands a similar figure, ‘Ministerial Man’, also grinning and with hands in his pockets, one of which is lettered ‘The Cash The Cash’. With feet on the shoulders of the latter and above Bull is a spreadeagled, large grinning figure, saying ‘No Party Man’, whose pocket is inscribed ‘a little more money if you please’; on his head is balanced a cushion-like object lettered ‘Promises’, which supports the banner, ‘Reform’; on top of this is a similing head wearing a ruff, fool’s cap and ass’s ears.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker.
  • TitleThe hopes of the nation, or, New armorial bearings for John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. May 25th, 1809, by Thos. Tegg, No. 111 Cheapside, [25 May 1809]

Catalog Record 

809.05.25.01+

Acquired November 2017

The English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790

“The King of Spain sits on a circular dais under a canopy, turning his head away from the English ambassador (left), a stout John Bull wearing top-boots behind whom stand four pugilists. Three Spaniards with pikes stand on the extreme right behind the throne, and three courtiers stand in the background. The King wears a short tunic and ruff with a feathered hat; all the Spaniards have long upturned moustaches, all look dismayed. Three of the pugilists are inscribed: ‘Big Ben’ [Benjamin Brain], ‘Humphries’, and ‘Mendoza’; the fourth is Ward. Beneath the design is etched: ‘Great Sir, I am arrived from Albion’s Court, Who have taken in Dudgeon what you may think Sport; So it may for the present; but we’ll soon make it appear, You’ll have reason to laugh the wrong side of your ear! Our Traders in Nootka, by some of your Curs, Were all sent to Quod and robb’d of their Furs, Your right so to do which you claim from the Pope, We Britons dont value the end of a rope! It’s a farce you may make your weak Subjects believe, But our right’s equal to yours from Adam and Eve. Therefore if you don’t make us immediate amends, No longer can we look upon you as Friends, Should you wish for a War we have got a new race, Of such brave fighting fellows, not the Devil dare face! A sample I’ve brought, only four of our men, Mendoza, Dick Humphries, Joe Ward, and Big Ben: So great is their power each Lad with one blow, Would knock down an Ox, or twelve Spaniards lay low, At home we can raise twelve hundred like these, That would crush all your Troops as easy as fleas. For Centuries past England’s rul’d o’er the main, And if it please Heavn’n hope to do so again. Thus with Sailors and Bruisers we your power defy, Being determin’d to conquer or fight till we die!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleThe English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790 [graphic] / J.N. 1790.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., May 12, 1790.

Catalog record 

790.05.12.01+

Acquired May 2017