A Wellington boot, or, The head of the army

lwlpr34592 (715x1024)

“Wellington’s head, in profile to the right, projects from a huge spurred boot, showing the upper part of his embroidered collar. He wears an enormous field-marshal’s cocked hat. He has a satisfied smile, the eyes turned towards the spectator. On each point of the large star-shaped spur is a letter, to indicate some of his many orders: K.G. C.H. G G. C.B. Behind is Horse Guards Parade; a sentry stands in front of a cannon; men are drilling in the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitleA Wellington boot, or, The head of the army [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esqr. del.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [October 1827]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

827.10.00.01+

Acquire May 2016

A general retreat

lwlpr32192 (1024x784)

Political satire: Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) leading his Tory government ministers in flight from its attack on the castle of ‘Reform’ (as inscribed to the Tricolore flag of liberty that flies from the tower).

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker.
  • TitleA general retreat [graphic] / CJG.
  • Published[London : Pub. Nov. 18, 1830, by S. Gans, Southampton St., Strand, 18 November 1830]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

830.11.18.01+

Acquired September 2014

The head of the great nation, in a queer situation

Click for larger image

“Napoleon, a little figure with a big head, stands with legs astride, head turned to the left, hair on end; his arms are extended, fingers spread, mouth open as if shrieking. He has a grotesque profile with corvine nose and wears high jack-boots with large spurs. At his feet lies a broken baton inscribed ‘Magic Wand’. Five allies threaten him at point-blank range, and from a circle of cloud an arm emerges holding a conical ‘Allied Extinguisher’ above his head. On the extreme left Wellington aims a blunderbuss, saying, “Take a good aim at the Head Gentlemen, & we shall soon settle the Business.” On Wellington’s left stands Francis I, aiming a small pistol; by his head are the words: ‘A way Mr Boney the Hand of Justice [see No. 12247] will put your Night Cap on at last.’ On the extreme right a fat Dutchman, wearing a conical cap as in No. 12105, stands behind a small cannon holding a lighted match and a cannon-ball inscribed ‘Orange Boven’; he says: “I’ll deal out my Oranges to him Wholesale.” Beside him are piled cannon-balls inscribed ‘Orange’. In his hat are orange ribbons inscribed ‘Orange Boven’ and a tobacco-pipe. Next him the Tsar leans forward, aiming a large pistol; he says: “I’ll rattle a few Snow Balls at his Cranium.” On Alexander’s right stands Bernadotte, aiming a small pistol; he says: “By gar we shall mak de head look like de plomb Pudding.” All but the Dutchman wear uniform with cocked hats. A background of smoke or cloud is indicated.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: The head of the great nation, in a queer situation [graphic] / G. Cr . fect.
  • Published: [London : Pub. Dec. 1813 by S. Knight, Sweetings Alley Royl., December 1813]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

813.12.00.01+

Acquired November 2013

A kick up among the whigs

A kick up among the whigs: 1 print on wove paper : etching, hand-colored ; plate mark 26 x 37.3 cm., on sheet 31 x 41 cm.Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker

A kick up among the whigs / [man with an umbrella] Esqr. del.

Published: London : Pub. by Tho. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [Jan. 1828?]

828.01.00.05+

A satire on the formation of a Tory Ministry by Wellington in 1828. Wellington is shown in the uniform of a Life Guards officer riding his charger over little men made of large wigs — judges’ wigs, barristers’ wigs, bag-wigs — as they flee in confusion. One clings to the strap around Wellington’s arm, crying “Hold tight Huskey” (Huskisson). George IV stands in the background, hands on his hips, laughing at the scene.

Subjects (Library of Congress): George IV, King of Great Britain, 1762-1830–Caricatures and cartoons; Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, Duke of, 1769-1852–Caricatures and cartoons; Huskisson, W. (William), 1770-1830–Caricatures and cartoons; Whig Party (Great Britain);
Satires (Visual works) England 1821; Etchings England London 1821; Artists’ devices.

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: July, 2010


The political pyramid of our glorious constitution…

Williams, Charles, 1797-1850, engraver

The political pyramid of our glorious constitution in the year of grace 1828 of his Grace I.

Published: [London] : Pubd. Sepr. 1828 by J. Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, [Sept. 1828]

828.09.00.02+

A satire on Wellington’s dismissal of the Duke of Clarence. A pyramid built of large stones stands in a open field. At the apex is inscribed the word “King” at the base left “Lords” and right “Commons”. Knelling on either side in his robes is a peer facing a simply dressed M.P. Between them on the ground are the heads of a unicorn and a lion which is being gnawed by a crow and a rat. Wellington in full uniform straddles the two men who support him. Between his legs a plague on the pyramid reads: “Multum in parvo, or the British Constitution formerly consisting of the three estates, King, Lords, Commons, abridged into an elegant extract in one volume!”

Political pyramid: 1 print on wove paper : etching, hand-colored ; plate mark 25.4 x 36.5 cm., on sheet 30 x 39 cm.      Subjects (Library of Congress): Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, Duke of, 1769-1852–Caricatures and cartoons;
William IV, King of Great Britain, 1765-1837; Great Britain. Admiralty; Great Britain–Politics and government–1800-1837; Pyramids; Satires (Visual works)–England–1828; Etchings–England–London–1828.

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: July, 2010

Caleb Quotem the parish factotum…

Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker

Caleb Quotem the parish factotum : he is all, he is evry thing the parish could not go on without him, he has more trades than hairs in his wig / [man with an umbrella] Esqr.

Published: [London] : Pub. June 1st, 1829 by S. Gans 15 Southampton St. Strand …, [1 June 1829]

829.06.01.07+

Wellington as the character Caleb Quotem from George Colman’s “The review, or, The wags of Windsor” stands full-face in an old-fashion attire, holding a whip in one hand and a large Grenadier’s bearskin in the other. From his mouth and scrolling above his hear is a long descriptive list satirizing his character and career.

Caleb Quotem: 1 print on wove paper : etching, hand-colored ; sheet 35 x 25 cm.       Subjects (Library of Congress): Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, Duke of, 1769-1852–Caricatures and cartoons; Satires (Visual works) England 1821; Etchings England London 1821; Artists’ devices.

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: July 2010