Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander

“John Bull, blindfold, stands on a massive truncated pillar holding the beam of a pair of scales. In one scale (left), near the ground, Mrs. Clarke sits composedly among a mass of papers, holding one inscribed My dear Dearest Dearest Darling [see British Museum satires no. 11228, &c.]. The others are inscribed: Sandon, Toyne [Tonyn], Dowler, Omeara, Carter, French, Knight, Clavering. In the other scale the Duke of York swings high in the air, and shouts down to three men on the ground: Save me save me Save my Honour [cf. British Museum satires no. 11269]. They haul hard at ropes attached to his scale, which they tilt sideways so that he is in danger of falling out. One, a drink-blotched bishop wearing a mitre, says: Pull away Pull away the Church is in danger; the other two say: Pull away Pull away we lose all our Places, and Pull away pull away we shall lose our Noble Commander. On the pillar Britannia is depicted seated with her shield and lion; she holds the broken staff of a flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by J. Johnstone, 101 Cheapside, April 1809.

Catalog Record

809.04.22.02+

Acquired September 2019

Justice

Justice. Detailed description below

“Justice stands on a small rocky plateau surrounded by waves. She holds up a pair of scales; on one scale (left) stands the Queen, noble and dignified, in royal robes, the crown at her feet. She far outweighs the other scale, on which is a huge green bag: ‘Ev[ide]nce a[gainst] [t]he [Que]en’; Castlereagh, Sidmouth, and Canning stand round it, with a serpent as pendant to the crown. The Queen holds out a scroll headed ‘Righ .. of .. Queen’ and an open book: ‘Liturgy’. Castlereagh holds out to her a scroll headed ‘50,000 pr An’; he says: “Another Bag (now almost ready) Will make the Balance firm & steady, And certain other pond’rous stuff Will make the Lady light enough.” Sidmouth flourishes a clyster-pipe (cf. British Museum Satires No. 9849). Canning stands behind the Bag on the extreme right; he says: “I wish to God that I was out Of this infernal mounting Scale, For plainly I percieve a rout, And that the Lady must prevail.” The Queen: “Vipers Go! I can’t endure you, You wrong me I assure you, Yet still I spurn the wrong, and view, With calmness all your Bag can do.” Below the title : ‘”Do thou inspire the stroke “With prevalence divine – as thine the wrong, “Vengeance and punishment to thee belong; “The injur’d state of Innocece [sic] restore, “Crush the bold insults of aspiring pow’r, “Shine like thy radiant source, and mak the world adore.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Justice [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1 August 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.08.01.01

Acquired May 2019

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue. Detailed description below

“A broadside satirising Robert Walpole with an etching in two parts. In the left-hand scene Frederick, Prince of Wales, stands with the Duke of Argyll and other gentlemen, pointing to the left where George II embraces Britannia. In the foreground, the grotesque figure of Walpole, wearing a coronet, kneels holding in five hands, bags of French and Spanish gold and another lettered, “I am Lord Corruption”. Behind him stands his daughter, Lady Mary, toying with a coronet. On the ground beside Walpole, the French cock perches on the back of the exhausted Imperial Eagle, but the British lion watching the conflict growls, “Now I’m rousing”. In the background, the white horse of Hanover kicks a man off a high rock; the man cries, “I’m lost”; a ship lies at anchor off Cartagena observed from another high rock to right by Admiral Vernon whose impetus towards the city is restrained by General Wentworth; below these two men sits Admiral Haddock chained to a rock (a reference to the limitation of his resources in dealing with the combined Spanish and French Mediterranean fleets). In the right-hand scene Walpole raises his hands in horror at the appearance in a cloud of smoke of the ghost of Eustace Budgell who holds out a paper described in the verses to left as a “black Account …Full twenty Winters of Misdeeds”; on the table at which Walpole is sitting is a large candlestick and letters addressed “A son Eminence” (Cardinal Fleury) and “à don [Sebastian] de la Quadra” and a book on “The Art of Bribery”. Budgell’s ghost raises his hand above his head to point at a scene of a beheading in the background above which flies Time while Justice sits on a column beside the scaffold and a crowd cheers below; over a doorway to right is a portrait of a Cardinal, presumably intended for Wolsey who is mentioned in the verses on the right. Engraved title and dedication to the Prince of Wales on a cloth above the scene supported by two putti; verses in two columns on either side condemning Walpole for his maladministration and celebrating the new prominence of the Prince of Wales and his followers; lines of music in two columns below the etching.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue [graphic] : most humbly inscrib’d to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales *see the Chinese Orphan, a tragedy for the reason of this term / designd by N.S. ; engrav’d by G.S.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Eliza Haywood at Fame in the Piazza, Covent Garden, and sold by the printsellers and pamphlet shops of London and Westminster, according to act of Parliament, [1742]

Catalog Record 

742.00.00.10++ Impression 2

Acquired January 2019

Honour to the defenders of innocence & the rights of the nation

A pot lid with a transfer print showing the figure of Justice in the center with outstretched arms holding laurel wreaths over two lists on either side naming the members of the House of Lords who voted for her acquittal.

  • TitleHonour to the defenders of innocence & the rights of the nation [realia].
  • Production[London], [1820]

Catalog Record

66 820 H759

Acquired May 2017

The children of India worshiping the golden calf

“Indian men and women kneel before a large rectangular pedestal on which stands a golden calf with the head of Hastings. Three Indians lie on the pedestal at Hastings’s feet, making gestures of despair and entreaty. From his mouth protrudes a sword (left) inscribed ‘The Brand of Devastation’. On his back sits Wilkes facing the tail (right) which he lifts with one hand; in the other is the cap of ‘Liberty’ in which he catches large jewels excreted by the Golden Calf. He wears a livery gown and says: “Who would not wipe a Calf’s Backside, To gain the Sparks of Eastern Pride”. At the Calf’s feet lie a crown, sceptre, and orb, with (?) scimitars. On the ground and on the extreme left a well-dressed man stands before an altar holding a knife which drips blood over the altar; he says, pointing to an Indian who lies at his feet, stabbed through the heart: ‘When British Judges rule the Coast, The Natives must obey, No palliative means we boast, By G——you die or pay’. In the foreground (right) stand Thurlow and a military officer. The Chancellor, who wears his wig and robe, is blindfolded; in his right hand he holds erect the ‘Sword of Justice’, which is being taken from him by the officer who holds a diamond against the blade. In Thurlow’s left hand is a bag inscribed ‘Gold Moors’; he says: “Which Powerful God my wavering mind controuls, And my Sage Brows with Golden bands infolds, ‘Tis Mammons self I can be Just no more, Take thou the Sword give me the Golden Store”. The officer, who wears a wallet or haversack inscribed ‘Diamonds’, says: “So shall we Triumph while the Diamond’s smile, Can melt the Soul and Justice’s beguile.” Three Indians who kneel in the foreground below the pedestal of the Golden Calf are offering money (a bag inscribed ‘Gold Moors’) and jewel-boxes to Hastings.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleThe children of India worshiping the golden calf [graphic] : this be thy God O India! who has brought thee to the verge of destruction.
  • Publication:[ London] : Publish’d May 15, 1788, by J. Berry, No. 129 Oxford Road, [15 May 1788]

Catalog Record 

Drawer 788.05.15.01

Acquired October 2017

Majority one against the boroughmongers

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A satire on the electoral Reform Bill of 1831, which was passed soon after this print was issued. Grant shows the figure of blind Justice leaning out from a mass of billowing clouds and holding her scales labelled “Reform 1813”. The load on the left side labeled “People’, though containing fewer documents — Magna Carta, Economy & Retrenchment, Peace of Plenty, Extension of the Electi[c] Franchise, Cheap Government — is heavier than the other plate “Oligarchy” which is weighted down by: Bribes, Corruption, Six Acts, Corn Law, Church, Rotten Boroughs, Corporation Charters, Law & Iniquity, Taxes, Imposts, Holy Alliance, [F?]onal Debt. A group of four men in the left foreground include a judge; the one man says “Behold! a mere feather turns the ballance in our favour and saves us from revolution & disgrace.” Just beyond them in the middle distance the King stands firmly and says “The triumph of this great & vital cause will fix my crown more firm upon my head.” On the right a group of over six men including a clergyman who wipes his brow and cries “The draft is in their favor. Our cause is lost. Oh dictatorium, dictatorium, dic-“. Another gentleman behind him cries “They may vainly recken on a paltry unit, we have yet power to rent it peicemeal [sic].” In the distance a crowd cheers, and some hold signs for “Reform” and “Support the King & his ministers”, etc.

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852.
  • TitleMajority one against the boroughmongers [graphic] / C.J. Grant.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by John Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, March 26th, 1831.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

831.03.26.01+

Acquired January 2016

 

Ready mony the prevailing candidate

Click for larger image

 Print shows on the left, a statue of Justice in a niche beneath which a candidate, doffing his hat, offers a purse of money to a voter who replies, “Twill scarce pay, make it twenty more”, beside them a gentleman points to the statue saying “Regard Justice” to another carrying a bundle on his shoulder who replies, “We fell out, I lost money by her”. In the centre, in front of a large crowd are two candidates, both waving their hats, slip coins into two of the many pockets of a voter’s coat; one candidate says, “Sell not your Country” and the voter replies, “No Bribery but Pocketts are free”. Further to the right another candidate, saying “Accept this small acknowledgment”, offers a purse to a gentleman who grovels on the ground for coins that have been thrown down by the prevailing candidate, from his position on a chair supported by poles on the shoulders of four men. On the right, a statue of Folly in a niche empties bags of coins; before the statue is an altar on which a fire burns, a candidate kneels at its base imploring, “Help me Folly or my Cause is lost”; to the left of the altar, is a butcher crying “See here, see here” and to the right, a classical philosopher, saying “Let not thy right hand know what thy left does”, puts his hand behind him to received a bribe from a young man. Beyond is a tavern outside the landlord, wearing horns, calls out “He kist my Wife he has my Vote”; outside the tavern hangs the sign of a bottle with a large globe attached.

  • Title: Ready mony the prevailing candidate, or The humours of an election [graphic].
  • Published: London : Sold at the Print Shop in Grays Inn, [1727]

Catalog Record  & Digital Collection

727.00.00.02

Acquired July 2013

The balance of justice

“From the opposite ends of a horizontal balance hang (left) a triangle from which are suspended the corpses of thirteen sailors, and (right) the body of a military officer in uniform (Governor Wall); all have bandaged eyes. The balance hangs in front of a stone building, in the centre of which is an open door showing men seated at a council table, a messenger stands in the doorway giving a dispatch box marked ‘GR’ to another messenger, saying, “Deliver this Immediatly He must Die.” The pilastered doorway is inscribed: ‘Justitiae Soror Fides’; above it are kneeling statues of Truth and Justice; between them they support an inscribed tablet: ‘It is determined that British Justice shall never be Stained by Partiality, while the poor & ignorant suffer for their Folly the Rich shall also suffer for their Brutality and Infamy.’ On the wall are two placards: (left) ‘An Account of the Mutiny’, and (right) ‘A Full True and Particular Account of the Trial of . . . For the Murder of. . .’ This is headed by a print of a man being tied to a cannon and flogged, while an officer looks on and soldiers stand at attention.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The balance of justice [graphic] : NB in a few days will be published the old gunner lashed to the shrouds.
  • Published: [London: Pud. March 3d 1802 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, 3 March 1802]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

802.03.03.01+

Acquired November 2013

Britannia’s glory

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE: Britannia's glory

William Pitt created the Earl of Chatham on 29 July 1766 stands on the prostrate body of Envy alongside the Lord Chancellor Pratt, as they are presented by the figure of Justice to Britannia who receives the peers with pleasure. Minerva overhead holds two laurel wreaths over the heads of the statesmen. In the upper left Fame proclaims the event on her trumpet. On the right, in the background, the half-naked figure of the “scribler” (i.e. political opponent of the peers) is tied to the back of a cart and whipped by a hangman.

  • Title: Britania’s Glory.
  • Published: [London] : Sold by J. Williams at No. 36, next the Mitre Tavern, Fleet Street, Augt. 1766.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Acquired October 2011.