The peddigree of Corporal Violet

description below

“The base of the design is a dunghill from which rises the head of Napoleon as a young republican officer, not caricatured. His head is covered by a large cup-shaped fungus, decorated with a tricolour cockade and resembling a Cap of Liberty; from its apex ascends a curving stalk, terminating in the large yellow rosette of a sunflower, centred by the head of Napoleon as Emperor, larger than that of the base, and representing an older man; like the lower one it is directed slightly to the right. Below it, leaves project from the stalk, balancing the design. On Napoleon’s head is an arrangement of stamens in the form of an imperial crown. These unite to form the long scraggy neck of the third Napoleon, a head in profile to the right, emaciated and desperate. On this head is a larger fungus than that below, projecting like an enormous hat. From it ascend the stems of a bunch of violets, copied from No. 12511, but with the addition of more flowers, and on a larger scale. It contains the profiles of Napoleon, Marie Louise, and the King of Rome, arranged exactly as in British Museum Satires No. 12511. Smaller fungi sprout from the dunghill, some flat and some conical, like caps of Liberty; on the latter tricolour cockades are indicated. Four little figures are on a slope (left) leading towards the dunghill, prepared to clear it away. In front are Blücher and Wellington, running forward, and talking to each other; one holds a spade, the other a broad hoe. Behind them is the Tsar, shouldering a pickaxe. Behind again stands Louis XVIII, with splayed gouty legs, supported on a crutch. He waves his hat to cheer them on.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1780-1842, printmaker.
  • Title: The peddigree of Corporal Violet [graphic] / etchd. by G. Cruikk. ; G.H. invt. et del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey June 9th, 1815 – No. 27 St. James’s St., [9 June 1815]

Catalog Record

815.06.15.02+

Acquired April 2023

London sportsmen recharging

description below

Print shows one of two huntsmen negligently using a ramrod. A barnyard rooster hangs from his waist. His companion leans against a fence, voraciously gnawing a cold chicken, a bottle of ‘Porter’ in front of him. Near him lies a dead cat. The men are accompanied by two dogs.

 

  • Title: London sportsmen recharging [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record

812.00.00.127

Acquired August 2022

A royal salute

description below

A caricature of Queen Caroline embracing her lover Bartolomeo Bergami.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A royal salute [graphic] : le cannon est en bas.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Aug. 28, 1820, by S.W. Fores, 41 Picadilli [sic], [28 August 1820]

Catalog Record

820.08.28.01.1+

Acquired April 2023

London sportsmen finding a hare

description below

A satire on London hunters: A hare crouching in long grass beside an old tree at left while a young man runs forward dragging his gun, and holding out his hat to throw it over the animal. Two dogs follow behind him and a second man squats down with his gun to watch.

 

  • Title: London sportsmen finding a hare [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record

812.00.00.128

Acquired August 2022

The faith of treaties exemplified

description below

“A huge bull, snorting fire, rushes with lowered head towards a French fort (left) from which cannon-balls descend upon him. Beneath the fort sansculottes on one knee fire at the bull while standing French soldiers, correctly dressed, also fire. On the fortress stand Frenchmen, firing and waving their hats; they shout: “Vive la republic, Blood & plunder, no Quarter to John Bull!” A huge tricolour flag has a staff surmounted by a skull. To the bull’s back is strapped a bundle inscribed ‘Debt Debt’. One horn has been shot off and lies on the ground. To his left hind leg is chained a heavy weight inscribed ‘Subsidies’. Nevertheless, he cries: “Now my brave Allies let us all stand firm together & make a bold push, & I’ll be Answerable for the Event.” But behind him (right) his allies have all turned their backs and are departing in directions indicated by signposts. A fat Dutchman smoking a pipe goes ‘To Amsterdam’, saying, “I care not who beats, I’ll join the Strongest Party”. Frederick William II (father-in-law of the Duke of York) walks off ‘To Berlin’, saying, “I’ve fingerd the Cash from both Sides, & will now employ it to Secure the Partition of Poland”; “Negociate with Robertspierre privately & then – Damn Relationship!!!” Next, a Spanish don, Charles IV, goes ‘To Madrid’, saying, “Whats the Bourbon Family to me when they Impede my Interest. Hush!! I am now treating for a Separate peace with that Blackguard Roberspere to Secure my own Crown – I must enlarge the Powers of the Inquisition”. On the extreme right Francis II and Mack in a two-wheeled gig, on which is the Habsburg eagle, are driving off ‘To Vienna’. The Emperor says: “Well Mack we have made a Glorious Campaign of it; of what use are the Low Countries without they continue to fill my Coffers? As for John Bull, let him settle the business as he can he loves to be meddling”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: The faith of treaties exemplified, or, John Bulls last effort to oblige his false friends [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. July 17, 1794, by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, [17 July 1794]

Catalog Record

794.07.17.01+

Acquired January 2021

A riding-house

description belowA view of the interior of a riding-school: A number of men riding round in a circle; those in the foreground ride from right to left, those in the background from left to right. The riding-master stands in the centre, pointing with hand and cane, and grinning at a short fat man in a clerical wig who is running across the room, alarmed at the horses. A short obese man in back-view on the extreme right, who is about to mount his horse has been identified as Captain Grose. Next him is a man with a grotesque impression of alarm riding a plunging horse. Among the riders are two with clerical wigs. One horse is galloping, out of control, the others are quietly ambling round. Two sides of a high rectangular room or hall are visible; in each wall are two high arch-topped windows.

  • Printmaker: Bretherton, James, approximately 1730-1806, printmaker.
  • Title: A riding-house [graphic] / Mr. Bunbury del. ; Js. Bretherton f.
  • Publication: [London] : Published by Js. Bretherton, 15 Feby. 1780.

Catalog Record

780.02.15.03++

Acquired November 2019

Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander

“John Bull, blindfold, stands on a massive truncated pillar holding the beam of a pair of scales. In one scale (left), near the ground, Mrs. Clarke sits composedly among a mass of papers, holding one inscribed My dear Dearest Dearest Darling [see British Museum satires no. 11228, &c.]. The others are inscribed: Sandon, Toyne [Tonyn], Dowler, Omeara, Carter, French, Knight, Clavering. In the other scale the Duke of York swings high in the air, and shouts down to three men on the ground: Save me save me Save my Honour [cf. British Museum satires no. 11269]. They haul hard at ropes attached to his scale, which they tilt sideways so that he is in danger of falling out. One, a drink-blotched bishop wearing a mitre, says: Pull away Pull away the Church is in danger; the other two say: Pull away Pull away we lose all our Places, and Pull away pull away we shall lose our Noble Commander. On the pillar Britannia is depicted seated with her shield and lion; she holds the broken staff of a flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Iohn Bull as Justice weighing a commander [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by J. Johnstone, 101 Cheapside, April 1809.

Catalog Record

809.04.22.02+

Acquired September 2019

The celebrated Clark

see description below“Mrs. Clarke auctions commissions from a rostrum to a crowd of bidders, while the Duke of York acts as her clerk. All are unconscious of a net in which they are enclosed, and with which the Devil flies off into flames (right). Mrs. Clarke (right), in profile to the left, with raised hammer, holds out a paper headed Commission. She says: Going for no more than £500 a Commission Positively worth 5000. An officer, probably Dowler, see British Museum satires no. 11253, holds out his arms towards her, saying, my dear dear dear Angel Knock it down to me or I am ruin’d. Another says: Let the good Bishop [the Duke, see British Museum satires no. 11227] have the Game & we my Boy will have the Cream. The other applicants are in civilian dress; one says to the bidder: my dear fellow dont be so anxious for depend upon it these tricks will be Found out & all will be Lost. The Duke of York, in uniform, records the bids in a book, his pen resting on the figure 500. He says Thus am I content to record & ratify the Destruction of the Army, my Country & myself, rather than loose my dear DARLING to [cf. British Museum satires no. 11228]. The Devil looks over his shoulder at Mrs. Clarke to say with a baleful grin: Going, Going Gon you may now say, for I have You tight enough my dear Honey.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The celebrated Clark, exalted to the pulpit by the humility of a royal bishop [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 22nd April 1809 by J.H. Warl, London, [22 April 1809]

Catalog Record 

809.04.22.01+

Acquired September 2019

 

The old English ‘squire

Plates: The old squire — Fetching the midwife — Dressing the young squire — Young squire gets ferrul’d for neglecting his studies — Breaking cover, or Hunting in Hampshire — Tries a new shooting pony, which won’t do — Crammed at college by his tutor for a degree — Gets cheated by his miller who grinds oats for him — Young squire goes to London and gets his pockets eased — Takes lessons in dancing — Sits for his portrait — Goes to the opera — Buys an historical picture. St. Anthony preaching to the fishes — Goes to a picture sale — Rides home on a borrowed horse — Mistakes mushrooms for game and spoils their shape — Meets with a small accident — His gun misses fire, because he had forgot to load it — Goes with some friends to shoot grouse on the moors — Not the safest way to carry loaded guns in a wood — Spurs himself in the wrong place — Sees a water kelpy — The village schoolmaster, fond of little bits — A cheerful dance.

  • Author: Chatto, William Andrew, 1799-1864, author.
  • Title: The old English ‘squire : “a jovial gay fox hunter, bold, frank and free” : a poem in ten cantos / by John Careless, Esq. ; illustrated with plates by one of the family.
  • Publication: London : Printed for Thomas M’Lean, 26, Haymarket, by Howlett and Brimmer, Frith Street, Soho, 1821.

Catalog Record 

53 C4 821

Acquired May 2019

Puzzled which to choose!!

“An African chief displays to a naval officer three black women, who stand together (right), grinning and coy, and absurdly squat and obese, with huge posteriors like those of the Hottentot Venus (see British Museum satire no. 11577). The officer, Lieut. Lyon, bows in profile to the right, right hand on his breast, staring with humorous and wary appraisal at the women. The chief, who smiles blandly, seated on a low slab, wears a huge nose-ring, a plume of ostrich feathers, and a sword for which his left ear serves as hilt. Immediately behind him is a bodyguard of four warriors holding tall spears on each of which a skull is transfixed. Two grin, one looks with sour possessiveness at the women. All the Africans are very negroid, and naked except for small aprons. Behind the women are more Africans, much amused. Behind Lyon stand an astonished naval officer and two amused military officers; all are in dress uniform. Behind these are grinning sailors and on the extreme left the tips of the bayonets of the escort, with a Union flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: Puzzled which to choose!! or, the King of Timbuctoo offering one of his daughters in marriage to Capt. — {anticipated result of [the] African Mission} / [anchor] ; G. Cruikshank, sculpt.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Octr. 10, 1818 by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, [10 October 1818]

Catalog Record

818.10.10.01+

Acquired October 2017