Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph

Cary Brunswick o' the Guelph. Detailed description below

“Heading to a broadside engraved in two columns. A stalwart Highland soldier, with plumed bonnet, stands outside an open doorway (left) crowded with cringing Italians. He lunges furiously towards them with clenched fist, saying: “Filthy brutes! i ‘ts for new boots, That a’ you Rogues are swearing at her”. The most prominent of the witnesses (cf. British Museum Satires No. 13762) are Majocchi (see British Museum Satires No. 13827) and Demont, see British Museum Satires No. 13856. Over the doorway: ‘Rogues Retreat’; at the corner of the building: ‘Cotton Garden’ [see British Museum Satires No. 13824]. Behind (right) is the Thames. The Highlander’s words are from the second verse of the song: ‘Air Tibby Fowler o’ the Glen’. The third of five verses: ‘Fie upon the filthy louns! There’s o’er mony swearing at her; Fifteen came frae German towns; There’s eight and fifty swearing at her; Swearing at her, mumbling at her, Tumbling at her, canna hit her; Tawdry louns! its for new gowns, The hizzies a’ are swearing at her.’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: Cary Brunswick o’ the Guelph [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, [September 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.09.00.01+

Acquired May 2019

A garland of new songs

collection of ballads

A collection of nine ballads with no music.

  • Title: A garland of new songs
  • Publication: Newcastle upon Tyne : Printed by J. Marshall, in the Old Flesh-Market, where may also be had, a large and interesting collection of songs, ballads, tales, histories, &c., [between 1800 and 1831]

Catalog Record 

File 74 800 G233 no. 1 – no. 9

Acquired March 2019

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue

The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue. Detailed description below

“A broadside satirising Robert Walpole with an etching in two parts. In the left-hand scene Frederick, Prince of Wales, stands with the Duke of Argyll and other gentlemen, pointing to the left where George II embraces Britannia. In the foreground, the grotesque figure of Walpole, wearing a coronet, kneels holding in five hands, bags of French and Spanish gold and another lettered, “I am Lord Corruption”. Behind him stands his daughter, Lady Mary, toying with a coronet. On the ground beside Walpole, the French cock perches on the back of the exhausted Imperial Eagle, but the British lion watching the conflict growls, “Now I’m rousing”. In the background, the white horse of Hanover kicks a man off a high rock; the man cries, “I’m lost”; a ship lies at anchor off Cartagena observed from another high rock to right by Admiral Vernon whose impetus towards the city is restrained by General Wentworth; below these two men sits Admiral Haddock chained to a rock (a reference to the limitation of his resources in dealing with the combined Spanish and French Mediterranean fleets). In the right-hand scene Walpole raises his hands in horror at the appearance in a cloud of smoke of the ghost of Eustace Budgell who holds out a paper described in the verses to left as a “black Account …Full twenty Winters of Misdeeds”; on the table at which Walpole is sitting is a large candlestick and letters addressed “A son Eminence” (Cardinal Fleury) and “à don [Sebastian] de la Quadra” and a book on “The Art of Bribery”. Budgell’s ghost raises his hand above his head to point at a scene of a beheading in the background above which flies Time while Justice sits on a column beside the scaffold and a crowd cheers below; over a doorway to right is a portrait of a Cardinal, presumably intended for Wolsey who is mentioned in the verses on the right. Engraved title and dedication to the Prince of Wales on a cloth above the scene supported by two putti; verses in two columns on either side condemning Walpole for his maladministration and celebrating the new prominence of the Prince of Wales and his followers; lines of music in two columns below the etching.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The ghost of Eustace Budgel Esqr. to the *man in blue [graphic] : most humbly inscrib’d to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales *see the Chinese Orphan, a tragedy for the reason of this term / designd by N.S. ; engrav’d by G.S.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for Eliza Haywood at Fame in the Piazza, Covent Garden, and sold by the printsellers and pamphlet shops of London and Westminster, according to act of Parliament, [1742]

Catalog Record 

742.00.00.10++ Impression 2

Acquired January 2019

The origin of Fairlop Fair

Broadside celebrating Fairlop Fair, held annually held on the first Friday in July. The broadside gives a short account of the origins of the fair, reproduces two songs sung by a Mr. Hemingway and a Mr. Lidard during the fair, and shows the festivities in an impressive woodcut which was printed from a woodblock fashioned from the celebrated Fairlop Oak. The Fairlop Oak was an impressive oak in the Hainault Forest near a lake at Fairlop Waters. In 1725 Daniel Day (d. 1767), a ship-builder, took some friends for a picnic there, repeating this for a number of summers until it gradually developed into a larger event, attended by ship-, boat- and barge-builders and their associated trades, though it was always held without a charter. By the early 19th century it was a well attended fair, known for its sometimes riotous behaviour. Day always made a point of arriving at the fair in a boat on wheels and this tradition continued. These impressive modes of transport, festooned with lights and sails, full of people in garish costumes making music and breaking into song were one of the features of the fair, and a well-known spectacle in the East End of London when they set off. By 1813 the Fairlop Oak had lost a great deal of its crown. The broadside here records its girth as being 36 feet. The tree was blown down in a gale in 1820, and its timber was used for a variety of celebratory furniture but also for the block from which the present woodcut was carved.

  • TitleThe origin of Fairlop Fair, &c. : taken from an original drawing by an eminent artist & printed off a wood cut engraved on a block of the celebrated tree.
  • Publication[Ilford, England] : J.W. Peele, [1824]

Catalog Record

File 74 824 P374

Acquired April 2017

 

The pleasant musical companion

lwlacq000209-1024x713

An alphabetical table of the catches contain’d in this book

  • CreatorBlow, John, 1649?-1708.
  • TitleThe pleasant musical companion : being a choice collection of catches, for three and four voices / compos’d by Dr. John Blow, the late Mr. Henry Purcell, and other eminent masters.
  • EditionThe tenth edition, corrected; and several new catches.
  • PublishedLondon : Printed and sold by J. Johnson, musical-instrument-maker, at the Harp and Crown facning Bow-Church in Cheapside …, [1740?]

Catalog Record

LWL Mss Vol. 222

Acquired July 2016

 

A new canting dictionary

lwlacq000183 (658x1024)

“A collection of songs in the canting dialect”

  • TitleA new canting dictionary : comprehending all the terms, antient and modern, used in the several tribes of gypsies, beggars, shoplifters, highwaymen, foot-pads, and all other clans of cheats and villains : interspersed with proverbs, phrases, figurative speeches, &c. … : with a preface, giving an account of the original, progress, &c. of the canting crew, and recommending methods for diminishing these varlets, by better employment of the poor : to which is added a complete collection of songs in the canting dialect.
  • PublishedLondon : Printed and sold by the booksellers of London and Westminster, 1725.

Catalog Record

78 725 N45

Acquired January 2016

The bonny broom

lwlpr32593 (392x1024)

A slip song. In this edition the woodcut shows a pastoral scene with a couple standing on the left beneath a tree and two dogs on the right.

  • TitleThe bonny broom : a song, new set to music.
  • Publication[King’s Lynn, England : Printed and sold at Garratt’s Printing-Office in Lynn, Norfolk, ca. 1780]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

File 763 780 B716+

Acquired July 2015

 

Songs and poems of love and drollery

49 1992

49 1992_tp

Horace Walpole’s copy

  • Author: T. W. (Thomas Weaver), 1616-1663.
  • Title: Songs and poems of love and drollery. By T.W.
  • Published: [London : s.n.], Printed in the year, 1654.

Catalog Record

49 1992

Acquired May 2005

The artillery driver

The artillery driver.

Published: London : Printed for & sold by Carington Bowles, No. 69 St. Paul’s Church Yard, published as the act directs 9 Novr. 1792.

792.11.09.02+

A yokel in a smock-frock and military hat stands in the foreground holding a whip; behind him in the field are the tents of a military camp with soldiers milling around. On the tent nearest the yokel is written the word “Demezy”, above the Prince of Wales’s feathers. Three columns of verse engraved below title: I once was a waggoner sly and dry, as e’er jogg’d over the downs …

The artillery driver: 1 print on laid paper : mezzotint, hand-colored ; plate mark 35.5 x 25 cm., on sheet 44 x 29 cm.Subjects (Library of Congress): Military life–Poetry; Military camps–British; Satires (Visual works)–England–1792; Mezzotints–England–London–1792; Songs–1792; Dighton, Robert, 1752-1814, artist; Bowles, Carrington, 1724-1793, publisher.

Gift of William M. O’Keefe; July 2010.

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: July, 2010