Peeling a Charley

“Peel kicks a lean old watchman behind, and drags from his shoulders his patched and tattered coat. Just behind him (right) is a big bonfire in which a watch-box and battered lanterns are blazing; beside it lie more lanterns, a rattle, and staves. In the background a watchman hangs by the neck from the branch of a tree, still holding rattle and lantern. Beside the tree is a pond from which projects an arm clutching a rattle. Peel says: ‘”But such a poor, bare-forked animal as thou art–Off–off you lendings: come unbutton here vide Shaks–‘ [“Lear”, III. iv]. The terrified watchman answers: ‘”Nay, take my life and all, pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live, vide Shaks.’ [“Merchant of Venice”, IV. i].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Peeling a Charley [graphic] / William Heath.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Sep. 29th, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [29 September 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.09.29.01+

Acquired October 2018

A copy of verses humbly presented to the Right Worshipful the Mayor

lwlpr32595 (796x1024)

Probably a Christmas poem.
With a woodcut showing a watchman with his dog with buildings including a church behind

  • AuthorBouch, Thomas.
  • TitleA copy of verses humbly presented to the Right Worshipful the Mayor, the aldermen, and common-council-men, and the rest of my worthy masters and mistresses dwelling in King’s-Lynn / by Thomas Bouch, watchman, 1752.
  • Publication[King’s Lynn, England? : Publisher not identified, 1752]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

File 763 752 B752++

Acquired July 2015