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Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader

Skepticism

Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader
Edited by Keith DeRose and Ted A. Warfield
Oxford University Press, 1999
A collection of the best and most important recent philosophical essays on the topic of skepticism.


Contributors:


Contents

Chapter 1    Introduction: Responding to Skepticism
Keith DeRose
1. The Argument by Skeptical Hypothesis
2. “Aw, Come On!”
3. Moore’s Response
4. The Response from Semantic Externalism
5. Responses from Epistemic Externalism
6. Relevant Alternatives and Denying Closure
7. Contextualist Responses
8. Concessive Responses

PART ONE
The Response from Semantic Externalism

Chapter 2    Brains in a Vat
Hilary Putnam

Chapter 3    Semantic Answers to Skepticism
Anthony Brueckner

Chapter 4    Realism and Skepticism: Brains in a Vat Revisited
Graeme Forbes

Chapter 5    A Priori Knowledge of the World:
Knowing the World by Knowing Our Minds
Ted A Warfield

PART TWO
Responses from Epistemic Externalism

Chapter 6    Philosophical Scepticism and Epistemic Circularity
Ernest Sosa

Chapter 7    Process Reliabilism and Cartesian Scepticism
Christopher S. Hill

PART THREE
Relevant Alternatives and Denying Closure

Chapter 8    Epistemic Operators
Fred Dretske

Chapter 9    Skepticism, Relevant Alternatives, and Deductive Closure
Gail Stine

Chapter 10   Philosphical Explanations (Selections)
Robert Nozick

PART FOUR
Contextualist Responses

Chapter 11  Solving the Skeptical Problem
Keith DeRose

Chapter 12  Elusive Knowledge
David Lewis

PART FIVE
Concessive Responses

Chapter 13  Philosophical Relativity (Selections)
Peter Unger

Chapter 14  The View from Nowhere (Selections)
Thomas Nagel

Chapter 15  Scepticism, ‘Externalism’, and the Goal of Epistemology
Barry Stroud

Bibliography
Index


Editor’s Introduction: “Responding to Skepticism”

Note: This is from the disk I (KDR) sent to Oxford UP.  Since the document on the disk was edited a bit, what appears here is not exactly as the essay appears in Skepticism.  It’s pretty close, though.  In the version that appears in the book, page references to other essays in Skepticism refer to page numbers in the book, while here page references are, for the most part, to the original place of publication of the essays referred to.
For an example of a course using this book, see the syllabus to my Spring ’99 seminar in epistemology by clicking

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