Arming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!!

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John Bull, a much overburdened soldier, looks up in angry dismay at a helmet inscribed ‘Glory’ which Pitt (left) is about to place on his head. He says, “O D—-n the Glory I shall never be able to bear it all!” Pitt stands in profile to the right; the large plumed helmet which he holds up in both hands is irradiated. From his pocket hangs a long paper headed ‘List of Ships £5000000’. John Bull, short and stout, stands full face wearing a gorget, with two pistols in his belt, a long sabre suspended horizontally from his waist, its blade inscribed ‘Twenty more Kill em!’ He holds a blunderbuss in his right hand, which fires ‘Pop Pop’ into the air; a large pike in his left hand, a broadsword held in his left arm; a musket and a huge knapsack are slung on his back. In the foreground are ordnance stores: a barrel (left) inscribed ‘Right Richmond double Proof’ with cannon-balls, and (right) a cannon, cannon-balls, drum, and flag. In the background a fleet of ships sails from the shore on which stands a cheering crowd.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorCollings, Samuel, attributed name.
  • TitleArming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!! [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, Aug. 6, 1790.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

790.08.06.01+

Acquired May 2016

The Flushing phantasmagoria, or, Kings conjurors amusing John Bull

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“A ‘conjuror’ or magician displays to John Bull on a screen four scenes, one below the other, representing the expedition to Flushing. He wears a conical hat with a wide fur brim, and his magician’s robe resembles that of the Chancellor of the Exchequer, indicating Perceval; he holds a long staff or wand topped by a little head, that of Portland, grinning; it is labelled The Old One. John stoops to look through a telescope inscribed Patent directed at the screen, the vision on which is projected by a small dark-lantern held by Perceval. John is a yokel in a smock; beside him lies his cudgel inscribed Oak. He is highly delighted at what he sees, namely: [1] a fleet leaving England, tiny figures being indicated on the shore. [2] Ships bombarding and soldiers attacking a fortified town which is on fire. [3] The garrison of the town surrendering to British officers, with grenadiers drawn up at attention. A French officer holds out the keys of the town to Chatham, one of whose staff is in Highland uniform. Two tricolour flags are being laid down by fat Dutchmen in French uniforms. [4] British troops being landed from a man-of-war; wounded soldiers are being carried up the beach.” –British Museum online catalogue

  • PrintmakerWilliams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • TitleThe Flushing phantasmagoria, or, Kings conjurors amusing John Bull [graphic] / Heath.
  • Publication[London : Pubd. Septr. 1809 by Walker, No. 7 Cornhill, September 1809]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

809.09.00.01+

Acquired May 2016

 

Britannia between death and the doctor’s

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A satire of Pitt’s return to office in 1804. Pitt is shown in the chamber of Britannia. Britannia sits listlessly on a bed, holding a sword in one hand. Next to her, leaning against the bed, is her shield and olive branches. Pitt holds aloft a bottle labelled “Constitutional Restorative” as he kicks another man, a caricature of Addington, through the door. Addington is in the process of dropping a bottle labelled “Composing Draft”. With his other foot, Pitt steps on the face of a flailing and prostrate Fox, who holds a bottle labelled “Rebublican Balsam” towards Britannia. From Fox’s pocket dice and a dice container labelled “Whig Pills” have fallen. Emerging from behind the bed curtains, the figure of Death, a skeleton with the face and plumed bicorne of Napoleon, overturns a table and upsets bottles of medicine and points his sword toward the unsuspecting Britannia.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: Britannia between death and the doctor’s [sic] [graphic] : “Death may decide when doctor’s [sic] disagree” / Js. Gillray inv. et fect.
  • Published: [London] : Publish’d May 20th 1804 by H. Humphrey, [20 May 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.05.20.02+

Acquired November 2013

Britannia’s glory

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William Pitt created the Earl of Chatham on 29 July 1766 stands on the prostrate body of Envy alongside the Lord Chancellor Pratt, as they are presented by the figure of Justice to Britannia who receives the peers with pleasure. Minerva overhead holds two laurel wreaths over the heads of the statesmen. In the upper left Fame proclaims the event on her trumpet. On the right, in the background, the half-naked figure of the “scribler” (i.e. political opponent of the peers) is tied to the back of a cart and whipped by a hangman.

  • Title: Britania’s Glory.
  • Published: [London] : Sold by J. Williams at No. 36, next the Mitre Tavern, Fleet Street, Augt. 1766.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Acquired October 2011.

Tit for tat, or, Kiss my a–e is no treason

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE: Tit for tat, or, Kiss my a--e is no treason

A satire, with figures drawn virtually in outline, includes images, starting from the rights, the Princess of Wales, mother of George III, who leans on a table, her skirts around her hips exposing her derrière to the bare-breeched Earl of Bute who stoops toward her. To the left of him is the French minister the Duc of Nivernois who also bows obsequiously toward the Earl and Princess. In the middle of the image are the representatives of Holland and Spain. On the left Hogarth in a Scotch kilt stands before his easel painting a large jack-boot; behind him is another canvas with a portrait of Pitt that has been scratched out. All of the images have speech bubbles in which they discuss how to curry favor at court, all of the satirical comments are directed against Hogarth after he accepted the position of Sereant-Painter to the King.

  • Author: Townshend, George Townshend, Marquis, 1724-1807.
  • Title: Tit for tat, or, Kiss my a–e is no treason / invt. et del. by G. O’Garth according to Act, or Order is not material.
  • Published: [England : s.n., 1762?].

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Acquired October, 2011 by the Lewis Walpole Library.