A nautical impromptu

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Satire with two naval officers (one of whom is the Duke of Clarence caricatured, with heavy jowl, protruding lips, and small slanting eye) abusing each other at table, observed by a civilian who winks and holds a finger to the side of his nose. The naval officer on the right says, “Why, they say there is always a fool in every family, & they generally send him to Sea.” The Duke of Clarence in the middle responds, ” How the Devil came you to put into the Navy, Captain.” The civilian to the right, observes, “Britons strike home!!!” On the table are plates of fruit and wine glasses with two carafes one of which is labeled “Goose” and a booklet entitled “An essay on Government by Jordan”. Two pictures on the wall in the background illustrate the theme: on the left, the image shows a man (King George) holds the arm of a crying young cadet, a sword between his legs, carries the title “Win them first then wear them.” On the right, “On board the London” is an image of two officers fighting while two big sailors smile as they watch.

  • Title: A nautical impromptu [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publd. Augt. 22d, 1827, by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, [22 August 1827]

Catalog Record 

827.08.22.01+

Acquired October 2018

Maternal management, or, A plot discovered

The plot hatched by a mother to marry her daughter to an old wealthy colonel is discovered. Both the mother and daughter are fashionably dressed in large dressess, hats and large sleeves. The mother stands on a veranda looking down at her daughter seated with a portfolio in her lap; she turns back to look at her mother raising a lorgnette to look up at her. In the speech balloon above her head, the mother is shown to say, “Julia, love, as Colonel Ingot has amassed a vast fortune in India, I really think him worth your attention. I have sent to the Music Seller for every thing Indian. Sing nothing else love, if you can bear a couple of Cashmeres on do & complain of the chilliness of the Climate, look into Guthrie for a few hard Bengal names & at dinner eat nothing but a little Currey, you can have refreshments in your dressing room love. The daughter smiles up at her mother, and says, “Very well Ma, but you don’t think he’d last long?” Below them, under the rose-coverd trellis the elderly colonel looks horrified at what he hears.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Maternal management, or, A plot discovered [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, 1829.

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.111+

Acquired October 2018

Melancholy loss of the medal

A magistrate sits behind his table listening intently to the angry harangue of a naval officer

“A magistrate sits behind his table listening intently to the angry harangue of a naval officer (right) who faces the accused (left), demure-looking, plainly-dressed woman, wearing a checked apron tucked round her waist, but evidently a prostitute. She is supported by two keen-looking lawyers. The officer, who is paunchy and wears very wide white trousers, stands with legs apart, right arm extended with pointing forefinger. He shouts: No. No. I’ve found my Breeches, but consider your Worship how I shall be Quized–The L–d H–h-A–l knows all about it. I never was before the Public but once, shant forget that in a hurry–Yes–yes I found the breeches, but where’s my Silver Gilt Trafalgar Medal eh? I’ll have it if it costs me a Thousand Pounds. I could’ent live without it. Ay Ay she’s the Thief but I will not hang her unless your worship wishes it–If I had her aboard my Ship D–n me I’de give her a round dozen–I would. Behind him stand a footboy in livery and two rough-looking men. The woman extends both arms and says pathetically I never robbed you Sir. The lawyer says: There’s no proof you cant Harm–her.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Melancholy loss of the medal [graphic].
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1828?]

Catalog Record 

828.00.00.01+ Impression 2

Acquired October 2018

Puzzled which to choose!!

“An African chief displays to a naval officer three black women, who stand together (right), grinning and coy, and absurdly squat and obese, with huge posteriors like those of the Hottentot Venus (see British Museum satire no. 11577). The officer, Lieut. Lyon, bows in profile to the right, right hand on his breast, staring with humorous and wary appraisal at the women. The chief, who smiles blandly, seated on a low slab, wears a huge nose-ring, a plume of ostrich feathers, and a sword for which his left ear serves as hilt. Immediately behind him is a bodyguard of four warriors holding tall spears on each of which a skull is transfixed. Two grin, one looks with sour possessiveness at the women. All the Africans are very negroid, and naked except for small aprons. Behind the women are more Africans, much amused. Behind Lyon stand an astonished naval officer and two amused military officers; all are in dress uniform. Behind these are grinning sailors and on the extreme left the tips of the bayonets of the escort, with a Union flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: Puzzled which to choose!! or, the King of Timbuctoo offering one of his daughters in marriage to Capt. — {anticipated result of [the] African Mission} / [anchor] ; G. Cruikshank, sculpt.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Octr. 10, 1818 by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, [10 October 1818]

Catalog Record

818.10.10.01+

Acquired October 2017

The present state of John Bull

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John Bull stands defiantly in the center of a crowd of angry men — military officers, gentlemen of various ages, tradesmen, and an amputee — most of whom hold out bills ranging between £50 and £5000; the speech bubbles above their heads read: “King’s taxes”; “Police rate”; “Parish rates”; “Excise duties”; “Tithes church rates pew rents & Easter doos [sic]”; “Sundres &c.” John Bull’s response reads, “Damme ye had better devour me., ye voratious crew. Am I never to have my hands out of my pocket again, but ‘t wont last long lads. I shall soon be in the Gazette & then ye lazy drones ye must work hard for you own livings.” The man with a large belly on the lower right carries a little dog under his arm.

  • Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, artist.
  • Title: The present state of John Bull [drawing].
  • Created: [England, between 1830 and 1852?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Drawings G761 no. 7 Box123

Acquired November 2013

A picture of wants

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A group of twelve man and women of various ages and walks of life — tradesmen, a clergy, a spinster, a military officer, a gentleman in shackles, a servant, a frail, sickly man, etc. — stand full length facing the viewer. Above their heads are brief expressions of their ‘wants’: “I want a job”; “I want more customers”; “I want a husband”; “I want for death”, etc. Only an obese gentleman on the right is content: “I want for nothing”; next to him, the military officer with a monocle says, “I don’t know what I want.”

  • Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, artist.
  • Title: A picture of wants [drawing].
  • Created: [England], [between 1830 and 1852?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Drawings G761 no. 9 Box123

Acquired November 2013

The balance of justice

“From the opposite ends of a horizontal balance hang (left) a triangle from which are suspended the corpses of thirteen sailors, and (right) the body of a military officer in uniform (Governor Wall); all have bandaged eyes. The balance hangs in front of a stone building, in the centre of which is an open door showing men seated at a council table, a messenger stands in the doorway giving a dispatch box marked ‘GR’ to another messenger, saying, “Deliver this Immediatly He must Die.” The pilastered doorway is inscribed: ‘Justitiae Soror Fides’; above it are kneeling statues of Truth and Justice; between them they support an inscribed tablet: ‘It is determined that British Justice shall never be Stained by Partiality, while the poor & ignorant suffer for their Folly the Rich shall also suffer for their Brutality and Infamy.’ On the wall are two placards: (left) ‘An Account of the Mutiny’, and (right) ‘A Full True and Particular Account of the Trial of . . . For the Murder of. . .’ This is headed by a print of a man being tied to a cannon and flogged, while an officer looks on and soldiers stand at attention.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The balance of justice [graphic] : NB in a few days will be published the old gunner lashed to the shrouds.
  • Published: [London: Pud. March 3d 1802 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, 3 March 1802]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

802.03.03.01+

Acquired November 2013