The complete house-keeper, and professed cook

  • Author: Smith, Mary, of Newcastle.
  • TitleThe complete house-keeper, and professed cook : calculated for the greater ease and assistance of ladies, house-keepers, cooks, &c. &c. : containing upwards of seven hundred practical and approved receipts … / by Mary Smith …
  • PublishedNewcastle : Printed by T. Slack, for the author, 1772.

Catalog Record 

655 772Sm

Acquired March 2018

The last of the Boroughbridges

“Wetherell (left), an invalid in dressing-gown and night-cap, reclines in an arm-chair, exhausted but laughing. Facing him stands Eldon in deep dejection, saying, with both hands raised, ‘Poor Boroughbridge! how is it with you?’ Cumberland, on the extreme right, stands behind Eldon, covering his face with his handkerchief; he says: ‘Facetious to the last!–It is quite affecting!’ Horace Twiss leans on the back of Wetherell’s chair; Chandos, dressed as a woman, stoops over the patient; both are smiling. Wetherell: ‘All over my friends! just in time to hear my “last speech and dying words”! But dont look so grave about it, I assure you we treat the matter in our house as if it was an excellent joke–to be sent out of the world with a dose of Russell’s purge”! is so droll; & then, we are to have such a merry funeral’. On a commode is a bottle labelled ‘Russell’s purge’. Peel, smiling, and Goulburn, holding a handkerchief to his face and leaning on Peel, watch from the background.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the original version of the print.

  • TitleThe last of the Boroughbridges [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S. Gans, Southampton Street, Strand, March 14th, 1831.

Catalog Record 

831.03.14.01+

Acquired March 2018

I wish you the same madam with all my heart!!

An obese, angry-faced man in a night cap sits in a chair in glaring out the window, his two gouty feet propped up on a pillow and his arms both also bandaged and the right arm in a sling. He is wearing a night cap and a heavy, lined robe; a cane rests against the arm of his upholstered chair. On the table to his right and on the floor to his left are many bottles of medicine with labels. Behind him on the wall is a framed picture of a volcano. decorating three panes of glass are sprigs of holly (?) with red berries.

  • TitleI wish you the same madam with all my heart!! [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Published Decr. 1832 by O. Hodgson, Cloth Fair, Smithfield, [December 1832]

Catalog Record 

832.12.00.01

Acquired March 2018

You see my dartur vears her hair like the Queen…

A homely, heavy-set girl (left) sits on a chair while an artist in spectacles (right) sits and sketches her in profile while her coarse mother in a mop cap smiles at the artist who looks back in surprise at her comment to him. Below is a clipping with the words, “You see my dartur vears her hair like the queen”. Possibly a satire directed at the new Queen, Victoria.

  • Creator: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, lithographer.
  • TitleYou see my dartur vears her hair like the Queen, consekently I should vish her to be taken as sich [graphic] / HH [monogram].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], [not before 1837?]

Catalog Record 

837.00.00.42

Acquired March 2018

The history and antiquities of the city and suburbs of Worcester

Extra-illustrated copy with an added 152 engravings and aquatints (dated from 1746 to the mid-19th century), two manuscript letters from the Duke of Beaufort, a pencil sketch of Edward Somerset, and a watercolor sketch of Worcester.

  • AuthorGreen, Valentine, 1739-1813.
  • TitleThe history and antiquities of the city and suburbs of Worcester … / by Valentine Green.
  • PublishedLondon : Printed for the author by W. Bulmer and Co., and sold by G. Nichol … [and 13 others], 1796.

Catalog Record 

Quarto 64 W92 796

Acquired March 2018