A North Country transfer

A North Country transfer

“Trotter walks off from the Bank of England with two sacks under his arm, one inscribed ‘I[ciphers obscured]000 Newland, appearing in the doorway (left), hurries after him, saying, “Hollo sir – where are you going with those bags!” On the opposite side of the street is a pawnshop where Melville, in bonnet and plaid, looks out over its half-door. Trotter answers: “I am only trotting over with them to Johnny Mac Crees Banking House!” Melville says: “Hoot awa mon! – dinna be afraid – they will be as safe with me as in your ain Strong box.” On the pawnshop door are the words ‘Money Lent’ and the three balls or pawnbroker’s sign.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • TitleA North Country transfer, or, Abraham Newland alarm’d [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 5, 1805, by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, [5 April 1805]

Catalog Record

805.04.05.01

Acquired May 2018

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

The allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole

“Three allied generals (left) hold the long handle of a shovel (peel) on which is a dish containing a tiny Napoleon. This they try to push into a baker’s oven, but are hindered by the Austrian emperor, who holds the door of the oven, feigning to be trying to open it, but actually holding it at an angle which prevents the entry of the dish. The leading baker is Blücher, wearing an apron over his uniform, and without a hat; he looks sternly at Francis, saying, “Pull away Frank! you Keep us waiting!” General Mikhail Woronzoff, young and handsome, immediately behind Blücher, pushes hard, saying, “In with it Blücher.” On the extreme left is Bernadotte, one hand on Woronzoff’s shoulder, saying, “I tell you what, Woronzow, the Hinges want a little Russia Oil.” Francis I, who like the others wears uniform with jack-boots, but has (baker’s) over-sleeves to the elbow, says with an expression of startled alarm: “This door Sticks! I dont think I shall get it open?!” A weathercock surmounts his cocked hat. Wellington comes up (right), poking him in the back with his baker’s tray on which are two pies. He says: “Shove alltogather [sic] Gentlemen! D-me shove door & all in!” His two pies are ‘Soult Pie’, with two spurred jack-booted legs projecting through the crust, and a pie with spires and other buildings, with a flag inscribed ‘Bourdeaux’. He wears an apron and the order of the Golden Fleece as well as the star of the Garter. A fat, grotesque Dutchman sits on a flat cushion gazing up at the oven; he holds, but does not use, a pair of bellows. In his conical hat is a tobacco-pipe. The fire under the oven is filled with broken eagles and fragments of weapons. Among the debris in the recess for ashes is a crown. Above the oven is the inscription ‘Allied Oven’ surmounted by a crown and cross-bones. In the shadow formed by the half-open door, a skull (Death) waits to receive Napoleon, who lies on his back, kicking violently, and shouting “Murder! Murder!!”; he wears a large plumed bicorne. The stone wall in which the oven is built forms the background.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe allied bakers, or, The Corsican toad in the hole [graphic] / G.H. ivt. ; Gruikshank [sic] fect.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 1st, 1814, by H. Humphrey, St. James St., [1 April 1814]

Catalog Record 

814.04.01.02+

Acquired June 2018

The hero’s return

The hero's return

“A scene in the Empress’s dressing-room. Marie Louise is horror-struck at the appearance of Napoleon who advances towards her in profile astride the back of a crawling Mameluke; he is held up by two other Mamelukes who support his arms and shoulders. He is terribly emaciated and appears moribund. He wears uniform; his legs, feet, and hands are swathed in bandages, his (former) ear and nose covered with black patches. The crawling Mameluke, presumably Roustan, holds out a bottle containing a pointed nose, and labelled ‘Le Nez de l’Empereur’. Immediately behind Napoleon and his three supporters are two kneeling Mamelukes, each reverently holding a tasselled cushion supporting a bottle; one being labelled ‘Les Doights [sic] de l’Empereur Napole . . .’, the other, ‘Les Oreilles de l’Empereur Napoleon’. Behind them (left) another Mameluke advances with a bottle labelled ‘Les Doights du pied de l Empereur Bon . . .’ The Mamelukes wear Turkish dress with turbans. Napoleon looks in tragic silence at his wife, who is seated in regal state but turns aside weeping with violent gestures of despair. A small terrestrial globe decorates her chair; her foot rests on a stool in the form of a flattened polar hemisphere on which the word ‘Brit[ain]’ is visible. Over her low-cut dress is an ermine-bordered robe clasped with a fleur-de-lis. She is supported by an emaciated court-lady, with a patched face, proffering a smelling-bottle, whose profile and a small crown show that she is one of Napoleon’s sisters; two other ladies, wearing crowns, stand behind the Empress, registering consternation. A less conspicuous lady weeps. On the Empress’s right kneels the Governess of the King of Rome, Mme de Montesquiou, holding the screaming child, and weeping noisily. He registers angry terror at the sight of his father; his little crown has fallen off. His features, though fore-shortened and distorted, resemble those of his father, cf. British Museum Satires No. 11719. He wears an ermine-trimmed robe over his childish tunic and breeches. Behind the Governess is a draped dressing-table, the drapery decorated by a large fleur-de-lis, and the toilet boxes ornamented with crowns. A terrified monkey climbs up the mirror, clutching at the crown which surmounts it, and looking over its shoulder at the shocking spectacle presented by the Emperor. On the extreme right a lap-dog stands on a cushion barking furiously at Napoleon. On the ground on the extreme left are two large round coffers, one inscribed ‘Coffre Pour la Bijoutère [sic] Russe’, the other expectantly open. Voluminous draperies on the left and right, supported on the right by a pillar add to the regal character of the room.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe hero’s return [graphic] / David pinxit ; etched by G. Cruikshank.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey, St. James’s St., Feby. 22d, 1813.

Catalog Record

813.02.22.01+

Acquired June 2018

Puzzled which to choose!!

“An African chief displays to a naval officer three black women, who stand together (right), grinning and coy, and absurdly squat and obese, with huge posteriors like those of the Hottentot Venus (see British Museum satire no. 11577). The officer, Lieut. Lyon, bows in profile to the right, right hand on his breast, staring with humorous and wary appraisal at the women. The chief, who smiles blandly, seated on a low slab, wears a huge nose-ring, a plume of ostrich feathers, and a sword for which his left ear serves as hilt. Immediately behind him is a bodyguard of four warriors holding tall spears on each of which a skull is transfixed. Two grin, one looks with sour possessiveness at the women. All the Africans are very negroid, and naked except for small aprons. Behind the women are more Africans, much amused. Behind Lyon stand an astonished naval officer and two amused military officers; all are in dress uniform. Behind these are grinning sailors and on the extreme left the tips of the bayonets of the escort, with a Union flag.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: Puzzled which to choose!! or, the King of Timbuctoo offering one of his daughters in marriage to Capt. — {anticipated result of [the] African Mission} / [anchor] ; G. Cruikshank, sculpt.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Octr. 10, 1818 by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s Street, [10 October 1818]

Catalog Record

818.10.10.01+

Acquired October 2017

The English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790

“The King of Spain sits on a circular dais under a canopy, turning his head away from the English ambassador (left), a stout John Bull wearing top-boots behind whom stand four pugilists. Three Spaniards with pikes stand on the extreme right behind the throne, and three courtiers stand in the background. The King wears a short tunic and ruff with a feathered hat; all the Spaniards have long upturned moustaches, all look dismayed. Three of the pugilists are inscribed: ‘Big Ben’ [Benjamin Brain], ‘Humphries’, and ‘Mendoza’; the fourth is Ward. Beneath the design is etched: ‘Great Sir, I am arrived from Albion’s Court, Who have taken in Dudgeon what you may think Sport; So it may for the present; but we’ll soon make it appear, You’ll have reason to laugh the wrong side of your ear! Our Traders in Nootka, by some of your Curs, Were all sent to Quod and robb’d of their Furs, Your right so to do which you claim from the Pope, We Britons dont value the end of a rope! It’s a farce you may make your weak Subjects believe, But our right’s equal to yours from Adam and Eve. Therefore if you don’t make us immediate amends, No longer can we look upon you as Friends, Should you wish for a War we have got a new race, Of such brave fighting fellows, not the Devil dare face! A sample I’ve brought, only four of our men, Mendoza, Dick Humphries, Joe Ward, and Big Ben: So great is their power each Lad with one blow, Would knock down an Ox, or twelve Spaniards lay low, At home we can raise twelve hundred like these, That would crush all your Troops as easy as fleas. For Centuries past England’s rul’d o’er the main, And if it please Heavn’n hope to do so again. Thus with Sailors and Bruisers we your power defy, Being determin’d to conquer or fight till we die!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleThe English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790 [graphic] / J.N. 1790.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., May 12, 1790.

Catalog record 

790.05.12.01+

Acquired May 2017

The English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790

“The King of Spain sits on a circular dais under a canopy, turning his head away from the English ambassador (left), a stout John Bull wearing top-boots behind whom stand four pugilists. Three Spaniards with pikes stand on the extreme right behind the throne, and three courtiers stand in the background. The King wears a short tunic and ruff with a feathered hat; all the Spaniards have long upturned moustaches, all look dismayed. Three of the pugilists are inscribed: ‘Big Ben’ [Benjamin Brain], ‘Humphries’, and ‘Mendoza’; the fourth is Ward. Beneath the design is etched: ‘Great Sir, I am arrived from Albion’s Court, Who have taken in Dudgeon what you may think Sport; So it may for the present; but we’ll soon make it appear, You’ll have reason to laugh the wrong side of your ear! Our Traders in Nootka, by some of your Curs, Were all sent to Quod and robb’d of their Furs, Your right so to do which you claim from the Pope, We Britons dont value the end of a rope! It’s a farce you may make your weak Subjects believe, But our right’s equal to yours from Adam and Eve. Therefore if you don’t make us immediate amends, No longer can we look upon you as Friends, Should you wish for a War we have got a new race, Of such brave fighting fellows, not the Devil dare face! A sample I’ve brought, only four of our men, Mendoza, Dick Humphries, Joe Ward, and Big Ben: So great is their power each Lad with one blow, Would knock down an Ox, or twelve Spaniards lay low, At home we can raise twelve hundred like these, That would crush all your Troops as easy as fleas. For Centuries past England’s rul’d o’er the main, And if it please Heavn’n hope to do so again. Thus with Sailors and Bruisers we your power defy, Being determin’d to conquer or fight till we die!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleThe English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790 [graphic] / J.N. 1790.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., May 12, 1790.

Catalog Record 

790.05.12.01+

Acquired May 2017

The itinerant chancellor

Four rows of designs with one to three designs in each, individually titled.

  • CreatorGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, lithographer, artist.
  • TitleThe itinerant chancellor [graphic] ; [and 9 other designs] / C.J. Grant invent., del. & lith.
  • PublicationLondon : Published by J. Kendrick, 54 Leicester Square …, [1 October 1834]
  • Manufacture[London] : Printed by Dean & Munday …

Catalog Record 

834.10.01.01+

Acquired November 2017

The traytors coat of arms

lwlpr35016-807x1024

A broadside, anti-Jacobite, anti-Catholic and anti-French. The lilies of the French Royal arms changed to upside down frogs and the legitimacy of the Stewart line questioned by the inclusion of the bed-pan child over the priest’s shoulder.

  • TitleThe traytors coat of arms [graphic].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], publish’d September the 16th, 1746, according to act of Parliament.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

746.09.16.01++

Acquired October 2016

The last stage of cruelty, or, A mercifull example of Quaerism

lwlpr33649 (724x1024)

“A plainly dressed man with lank hair falling on his shoulders, bends over a dog, placing his left hand on the head of the trustful animal. With a large brush he applies a smoking liquid to its side saying, “Come here poor Dog! Thee shalt not say I called thee names, or beat thee, for that would be cruel!! but I will anoint thee with Oil, and moisten thy sides with my pure Linnement.” The scene is in a yard with a high paling, outside an open door leading to the dispensing-room of the Quaker, evidently an apothecary. Just within the room is a large smoking jar of ‘Oil of Vitriol’; on the door-step is a dish of smoking vitriol. Above are the neatly ranged jars, bottles, and drawers of an apothecary, with a pestle and mortar. A woman in an upper window of an adjacent house looks down into the yard; she shouts: “Ah Obadiah, that decietfull whining Cant, to allure the poor Animal, in order to inflict the most Diabolical unheard of Cruelty on him, shall not go unpunished”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerWilliams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • TitleThe last stage of cruelty, or, A mercifull example of Quaerism [sic] at Brighton [graphic] : dedicated to the Society of Quakers.
  • Publication[London : Pubd. Septr. 1806 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, September 1806]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

806.09.00.02+

Acquired January 2016