Taking possession of his father’s effects

description below

Copy in reverse of the first state of Plate 1 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 132): the Jacobean interior of the house of Tom Rakewell’s late father with Tom at left being measured for a suit as he gives a handful of coins to the pregnant Sarah Young; behind him sits a lawyer compiling inventories; on the floor are boxes of miscellaneous goods, piles of mortgages, indentures, bond certificates and other documents; an old woman brings faggots to light a fire and an upholsterer attaching fabric (purchased from William Tothall of Covent Garden) to the wall reveals a hiding place for coins which tumble out.–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Taking possession of his father’s effects [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 768.03.25.01+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019

The game of see saw, or, Amusement for John Bull

description below“Mrs. Clarke (right) sits triumphantly astride the upper end of a see-saw which is supported on an upholstered stool. The Duke of York (left), dropping his sword, falls headlong from the other end which rests on the ground. She waves her arms, pointing a derisive finger at the Duke, and sings: “Here I go up up up and there you go Down Down Downy, The game it is pretty well up, and so you must fall to the Grouny!” The Duke sings: “What a way for to serve your own Sweety, how could you vex your own Deary, If you had not thrown me quite down, you’d have had your 4 hundred a Yeary.” On the ground are the Duke’s cocked hat (left) and (right) a mitre, with a book, ‘Ovid art of Love’, and crosier (see British Museum satires no. 11227), with writing materials and papers: a bundle of ‘Love Letters’ (see British Museum satires no. 11228, &c.) tied like legal documents, against which is a door-plate inscribed ‘for further particulars inquire within’, a bundle docketed ‘Account of Debts Gloucester’ [Place, see British Museum satires no. 11222, &c], a paper headed ‘To Col Wardle’. There is a landscape background irradiated by a setting sun.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Williams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • Title: The game of see saw, or, Amusement for John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. March 1809 by Walker, No. 7 Cornhill, [March 1809]

Catalog Record 

809.03.00.04+

Acquired November 2019

Confined in the Fleet Prison

description belowCopy (reversed) of the first state of Plate 7 of Hogarth’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’ (Paulson 138): A room in the Fleet Prison (after the painting at Sir John Soane’s Museum); Tom sits at a table, to right, on which is a rejection letter from John Rich to whom he has submitted a play; his wife clenches her fists, the gaoler asks for garnish money and a boy asks payment for a tankard of ale; to left, Sarah Young has fainted and is being administered smelling salts by one woman while another slaps her hand, her child clings to her skirt; she is supported by an older man with a beard who has dropped a sheet containing a scheme for paying the national debt (a reference to such a scheme put forward by Hogarth’s father); in the background an alchemist works at a forge.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Confined in the Fleet Prison [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d wth. [the] consent of Mrs. Hogarth, by Henry Parker, at No. 82 in Cornhill, March 25, 1768.

Catalog Record

Hogarth 768.03.25.07+ Box 210

Acquired December 2019