Fashionable ties, or, Modern neckcloths

Fashionable ties, or, Modern neckcloths

A macabre caricature divided into two compartments, The Dandy and The Dangle. On the left, a strutting dandy ties his neckcloth in front of a mirror saying: ‘I declare these large Neckcloths are monstrously handy, They [serve] for a shirt too and make one a Dandy.’ The right hand image is of a dandy, head covered in a cloth, dangling from a wooden beam with a tie around his neck. Behind him is a town square and in the foreground, a crowd looks on. The image is accompanied by the text: ‘When a man comes to this there’s little to hope, His neat Dandy Neckcloth is changed for a Rope’.

  • TitleFashionable ties, or, Modern neckcloths [graphic].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], [ca. 1810]

Catalog Record 

810.00.00.83+

Acquired November 2017

Hudibras’s first adventure

Hudibras's first adventure

Hudibras and Ralpho encounter a mob armed with sticks; in the foreground to right, a one-legged fiddler, a butcher and a dancing bear with his leader. On the left, a woman reaches out her arms.

  • PrintmakerHogarth, William, 1697-1764, printmaker.
  • TitleHudibras’s first adventure [graphic] / W. Hogarth delin. et sculp.
  • Edition[State 3].
  • Publication[London] : Sold by Phil. Overton near St. Dunstans Church Fleetstreet, [1726]

Catalog Record 

Hogarth 726.00.00.26 Box 100

Acquired June 2018

English coronet auction by K-, P- & Co.

In a large room French aristocrats crowd across a table from Pitt who is taking money while handing a pen to the man opposite who holds a crown in his left arm as he throws coins toward Pitt’s grasping hand. Above Pitt stands George III behind podium, gavel in one hand and another crown extended toward one of the many bidders shouting comments and prices. The King calls out, “This is a lot, gentlemen, of superior brilliancy to the last. This, this raises you above your fellows in a very high degree indeed. I pity your distresses from my soul, what, what, what was that you were saying about jewels, Madames, too high. You may ride over the necks of half the nation with this upon your coach. You may get in debt as fast as you please and never pay. Mind that gentlemen, never pay.” The Queen walks up a ladder behind the King to retrieve more crowns from the shelves behind the King’s podium, turning her head to say, “Pay some attention to that Lady’s jewels, my love.”

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleEnglish coronet auction by K-, P- & Co., or, Comfort for the late French noblesse [graphic] / designed by Corruption ; executed by Avarice.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Willm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford Street, July 8, 1790.

Catalog Record 

790.07.08.01+

Acquired May 2017

 

Inhuman & barbarous lingering torture….

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An example of the extreme torture against Christians: a half-naked man, his left hand and left foot impaled on hooks is suspended by chains from a gallows.

  • PrintmakerElmes, William, active 1797-1820, printmaker.
  • TitleInhuman & barbarous lingering torture, inflicted on an European, in Barbary [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pub. by T. Tegg, Dec. 21, 1808.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

808.12.21.02

Acquired July 2016

Majority one against the boroughmongers

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A satire on the electoral Reform Bill of 1831, which was passed soon after this print was issued. Grant shows the figure of blind Justice leaning out from a mass of billowing clouds and holding her scales labelled “Reform 1813”. The load on the left side labeled “People’, though containing fewer documents — Magna Carta, Economy & Retrenchment, Peace of Plenty, Extension of the Electi[c] Franchise, Cheap Government — is heavier than the other plate “Oligarchy” which is weighted down by: Bribes, Corruption, Six Acts, Corn Law, Church, Rotten Boroughs, Corporation Charters, Law & Iniquity, Taxes, Imposts, Holy Alliance, [F?]onal Debt. A group of four men in the left foreground include a judge; the one man says “Behold! a mere feather turns the ballance in our favour and saves us from revolution & disgrace.” Just beyond them in the middle distance the King stands firmly and says “The triumph of this great & vital cause will fix my crown more firm upon my head.” On the right a group of over six men including a clergyman who wipes his brow and cries “The draft is in their favor. Our cause is lost. Oh dictatorium, dictatorium, dic-“. Another gentleman behind him cries “They may vainly recken on a paltry unit, we have yet power to rent it peicemeal [sic].” In the distance a crowd cheers, and some hold signs for “Reform” and “Support the King & his ministers”, etc.

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852.
  • TitleMajority one against the boroughmongers [graphic] / C.J. Grant.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by John Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, March 26th, 1831.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

831.03.26.01+

Acquired January 2016

 

Election-candidates, or, The republican-goose at the top of the polle

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“The rival candidates swarm up a pole, inscribed ‘Westminster Election’, in front of the hustings in Covent Garden. At the top is Burdett with the body and beak of a goose … He is precariously poised on one webbed foot, the right leg. hanging down, dripping blood from a wound in the thigh (from Paull’s bullet), but he is supported by a pitchfork held against his rightump by Horne Tooke, or the Devil, who stands astride the roof of the hustings. Tooke has webbed wings inscribed ‘Deceit’ and ‘Sedition’, cloven hoof and barbed tail, with round hat, coat, and clerical bands. Burdett’s wings are ‘Conceit’ and ‘Vanity’; his neck is stretched out towards an irradiated sun in the upper right. corner of the design, at which he is hissing, ‘ssss [&c]’ issuing from his beak. On the disk is a crown on a cushion; it is encircled by the words: ‘The Sun of the Constitution’. Just below the goose is Cochrane, wearing the cocked hat and coat of a naval officer with striped seaman’s trousers. He is active and agile, one hand on the pole, and one leg round it. In his right. hand he holds up a bludgeon: ‘Reform’, shouting fiercely to the mob below; his right. foot rests on the cask which encloses the paunchy body of the man below (Elliot), who is falling backwards. From his pocket issues a paper: ‘Charges against St Vincent.’ Below him legs and arms wildly outflung emerge from the cask which is inscribed ‘Quassia’ … The head of the falling cask, inscribed ‘Elliots Home Br[ewed], drops off, and its foaming contents pour down. Elliot drops a paper: ‘Sixpenny Jack’s Address’. Below Elliot, Sheridan, in his Harlequin suit (see BMSat 9916), enormously fat, grasps the pole with arms and legs, making no progress. Below him Paull falls head foremost and in back view to the ground; he is dressed as in BMSat 10725 and his (wounded) left leg breaks above the top-boot. He drops his shears and a cabbage. …”–British Museum online catalogue

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • TitleElection-candidates, or, The republican-goose at the top of the polle [graphic] : the devil helping behind! / Js. Gillray invt. & fect.
  • Publication[London : Pubd. May 20th, 1807, by H. Humphrey, 27 St. Jamess [sic] Street, 20 May 1807]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

807.05.20.01+

Acquired October 2015

 

Ready mony the prevailing candidate

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 Print shows on the left, a statue of Justice in a niche beneath which a candidate, doffing his hat, offers a purse of money to a voter who replies, “Twill scarce pay, make it twenty more”, beside them a gentleman points to the statue saying “Regard Justice” to another carrying a bundle on his shoulder who replies, “We fell out, I lost money by her”. In the centre, in front of a large crowd are two candidates, both waving their hats, slip coins into two of the many pockets of a voter’s coat; one candidate says, “Sell not your Country” and the voter replies, “No Bribery but Pocketts are free”. Further to the right another candidate, saying “Accept this small acknowledgment”, offers a purse to a gentleman who grovels on the ground for coins that have been thrown down by the prevailing candidate, from his position on a chair supported by poles on the shoulders of four men. On the right, a statue of Folly in a niche empties bags of coins; before the statue is an altar on which a fire burns, a candidate kneels at its base imploring, “Help me Folly or my Cause is lost”; to the left of the altar, is a butcher crying “See here, see here” and to the right, a classical philosopher, saying “Let not thy right hand know what thy left does”, puts his hand behind him to received a bribe from a young man. Beyond is a tavern outside the landlord, wearing horns, calls out “He kist my Wife he has my Vote”; outside the tavern hangs the sign of a bottle with a large globe attached.

  • Title: Ready mony the prevailing candidate, or The humours of an election [graphic].
  • Published: London : Sold at the Print Shop in Grays Inn, [1727]

Catalog Record  & Digital Collection

727.00.00.02

Acquired July 2013

The present state of John Bull

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John Bull stands defiantly in the center of a crowd of angry men — military officers, gentlemen of various ages, tradesmen, and an amputee — most of whom hold out bills ranging between £50 and £5000; the speech bubbles above their heads read: “King’s taxes”; “Police rate”; “Parish rates”; “Excise duties”; “Tithes church rates pew rents & Easter doos [sic]”; “Sundres &c.” John Bull’s response reads, “Damme ye had better devour me., ye voratious crew. Am I never to have my hands out of my pocket again, but ‘t wont last long lads. I shall soon be in the Gazette & then ye lazy drones ye must work hard for you own livings.” The man with a large belly on the lower right carries a little dog under his arm.

  • Creator: Grant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, artist.
  • Title: The present state of John Bull [drawing].
  • Created: [England, between 1830 and 1852?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Drawings G761 no. 7 Box123

Acquired November 2013

The first day of term, or, The devil among the lawyers

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“An altered copy of British Museum number 3764 (circa 1792), a mezzotint after Dighton. The dress of the two non-barristers has been modernized, one or two background heads have been omitted. The principal barrister has been altered from a grotesque to a portrait of MacNally, adapted, in reverse, from No. 11409. It is he who holds out his hand for coins to a melancholy countryman, and has a large brief inscribed ‘Gaffer Flatscull agt Ralph Clodpole’. This and all other inscriptions are as in No. 3764. The attorney (right), who stands in profile to the left holding a pamphlet: ‘Practic'[sic] of petty Fogging’, wears a top-hat and has short cropped hair, and is better characterized than in the original and may be a portrait.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The first day of term, or, The devil among the lawyers [graphic].
  • Published: [Dublin : Pub’d by T. O’Callaghan, 11 Bride St., one door from Ross Lane, 1809?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

809.00.00.63

Acquired November 2013

The Piccadilly nuisance!

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  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • Title: The Piccadilly nuisance! [graphic] : dedicated to the worthy, acting magistrates of the district / G. Cruikshank sculpt.
  • Published: [London] : Pubd. by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, Augt. 1st, 1835.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

835.08.01.50+

Acquired April 2013