Banditti

description belowThe Coalition ministers are gathered around the table placed in the mouth of a cave. On the left sits Lord North wearing armor under his cloak, a goblet in his left hand. Opposite him on the right is Charles Fox, dressed as a centurion and sitting on a fox. He leans on the table keeping his right hand on three dice signed, “Madras,” “Bombay,” and “Bengal,” and clutching a dice box in his left. Behind him Admiral Keppel, the date of the battle of Ushant (1778) on his helmet, raises his goblet in a toast. Behind him Sheridan, with ass’s ears and “School for Scandal” written across his head cover, watches the Duke of Portland count out money to Lord Carlisle. On Portland’s shoulder leans Lord Cavendish in a centurion’s armor under his cloak. Between him and North sits Burke in a Jesuit’s outfit reading his own “Plan of oeconomy [sic].” Under the table lie the corpses of Lords Shelburne and Ashburton, ousted by the Coalition.

  • Printmaker: Boyne, John, approximately 1750-1810, printmaker.
  • Title: Banditti [graphic] / I.B.
  • Publication: [London] : Published by E. Hedges No. 92 Cornhill, Dec. 22, 1783.

Catalog Record

783.12.22.03.2+ Impression 2

Acquired December 2019

Vicar returning from duty

A fat parson riding (right to left) on a small horse arrives at the high iron gate of his house, which is seen in the background. He points arrogantly to a groom in livery, who stands (left) holding another horse whose front half appears on the left. The groom raises his hat. A butler stands in front of the gate. In the distance among trees (right) is a church spire.

  • Title: Vicar returning from duty [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record 

812.00.00.103

Acquired September 2019

Modern aquatics

Modern aquatics . Detailed description below.

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped shirts, open at the neck, nautical in cut. They row a lady who sits erect in a grotesquely huge hat, with wide brim, high jam-pot crown, and towering ribbons. They row badly and carelessly. In waterside arbours spectators drink and smoke. On the extreme left steps lead to the water, and two more amateur oarsmen, looking like buccaneers, stand, while a boatman in waders holds the bow of a boat. Behind are urban houses.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern aquatics [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.113+

Acquired October 2018

A view in Regent’s Park, 1831

A View in Regents Park. Detailed description below

Steam-driven coaches and carriages and three-wheeled vehicles loaded with well-dressed passengers fill Regent’s Park. The chaos and conjestion fill the park with dust and dark smoke and result in accidents.

  • Printmaker: Alken, Henry Thomas, 1784-1851, printmaker.
  • Title: A view in Regent’s Park, 1831 [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Feby. 20, 1828, by S & J. Fuller, at their Sporting Gallery, 34 Rathbone Place, [20 February 1828]

Catalog Record 

828.02.20.01+

Acquired October 2018

Maternal management, or, A plot discovered

The plot hatched by a mother to marry her daughter to an old wealthy colonel is discovered. Both the mother and daughter are fashionably dressed in large dressess, hats and large sleeves. The mother stands on a veranda looking down at her daughter seated with a portfolio in her lap; she turns back to look at her mother raising a lorgnette to look up at her. In the speech balloon above her head, the mother is shown to say, “Julia, love, as Colonel Ingot has amassed a vast fortune in India, I really think him worth your attention. I have sent to the Music Seller for every thing Indian. Sing nothing else love, if you can bear a couple of Cashmeres on do & complain of the chilliness of the Climate, look into Guthrie for a few hard Bengal names & at dinner eat nothing but a little Currey, you can have refreshments in your dressing room love. The daughter smiles up at her mother, and says, “Very well Ma, but you don’t think he’d last long?” Below them, under the rose-coverd trellis the elderly colonel looks horrified at what he hears.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Maternal management, or, A plot discovered [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Published by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, 1829.

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.111+

Acquired October 2018

Enough to make an angel swear

lwlpr34236 (725x1024)

A fashionably dressed young woman, adorned with feathers, is attacked by flocks of birds on the lawn of an estate. Another young woman flees towards the door of the house in the distance.

  • PrintmakerSeymour, Robert, 1798-1836, printmaker.
  • TitleEnough to make an angel swear, or, Real birds plucking the sham [graphic] / Shortshanks fect.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Thos. McLean, 26 Haymarket, [ca. 1828]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

828.00.00.114+

Acquired May 2016

The magnanimous minister chastiseing [sic] Prussian perfidy

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“Fox, wearing a military cocked hat, with civilian dress, threatens Prussia (or Frederick William III) with his sabre, while he puts a foot on the sword that Prussia has dropped. The latter, a grotesque figure with a long pigtail and moustaches, kneels terrified at his feet, clasping his hands in supplication. Fox says, with an expression of sour and calculating contempt, ” – O you Prussian Marauder, you! – what I’ve caught you at last? – what, You took me for a double-faced-Talleyrand! did you? – did you think I was like yourself, to Look One way & Row another? – what you thought because I make Loyal Speeches now, that I must be a Turncoat? – O you Frenchified Villain! – I’ll teach you to humbug & insult my poor, dear, dear Master? – & to join with such Rascals as Boney, & O’Conner!” Prussia exclaims, terrified, “indeed! indeed! indeed! I could not help it. – ” Meanwhile, Napoleon, holding his sabre, and wearing feathered bicorne, with spurred jack-boots, furtively hastens up to Fox from behind, to read the open book which the latter displays to him behind his back: ‘State of the Nation’.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The magnanimous minister chastiseing [sic] Prussian perfidy [graphic] / Jas. Gillray delt.
  • Created: [London : s.n, ca. 2 May 1806?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

806.05.02.01+

Acquired November 2013

Slight of hand by a monkey, or, The lady’s head unloaded

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 A lady walking along a high orchard wall has her enormous headdress, trimmed with lace and ribbons, pulled from her head by a monkey perched atop the wall. She clasps her hand to her bare head, a look of surprise on her face. A man perched on a ladder picking apples in the orchard looks over the wall in amusement at the scene. A butcher’s boy with a large tray stands in the street equally amused by the scene.

  • Title: Slight of hand by a monkey, or, The lady’s head unloaded [graphic].
  • Published: [London : Printed for Carington Bowles, at his Map & Print Warehouse No. 69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London, published as the act directs, 25 Oct. 1776]

Catalog Record  & Digital Collection

776.10.25.01+

Acquired April 2003

Can you forbear laughing

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“A lady stands at her dressing-table (right), her hair in an enormous pyramid decorated with feathers torn from a peacock, an ostrich and a cock. A young girl wearing a hat holds the peacock by a wing; another wearing a cap tugs hard at one of its tail feathers (which are very unlike peacock’s feathers). An ostrich (left), which has lost most of its tail feathers, is about to pluck out those which ornament the lady’s hair. A cock stands in the foreground (right), having lost almost all its tail feathers, many of which lie on the floor. A black servant wearing a turban stands on his mistress’s right, handing feathers from a number which he holds in his left hand. The lady, who faces three-quarter to the right, is elaborately dressed in the fashion of the day. Her pyramid of hair is decorated with lappets of lace and festoons of jewels as well as with feathers. She wears large earrings, a necklace with a cross, her bodice is cut very low, and her elbow sleeves have lace ruffles. A pannelled wall forms the background.”–British Museum online catalog.

  • Printmaker: Dawe, Philip.
  • Published: London : Printed for R. Sayer & J. Bennett, No. 53 Fleet Street, as the act directs 14 June 1776.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

776.06.14.01+

Acquired November 2012