Clerical anecdotes, and Parson’s comic songster

title page

  • Author: Rodger, Alexander, 1784-1846, author.
  • Title: Clerical anecdotes, and Parson’s comic songster : containing Advice to the priest-ridden / by Alexander Rodger, a Glasgow weaver. Also, A joiner’s bill.
  • Publication: Edinburgh : Printed and published by W. and H. Robinson, 11, Greenside Street, [not before 1842]

Catalog Record

763 R691 841

Acquired November 2019

 

Vicar returning from duty

A fat parson riding (right to left) on a small horse arrives at the high iron gate of his house, which is seen in the background. He points arrogantly to a groom in livery, who stands (left) holding another horse whose front half appears on the left. The groom raises his hat. A butler stands in front of the gate. In the distance among trees (right) is a church spire.

  • Title: Vicar returning from duty [graphic].
  • Publication: [Alnwick] : Printed and published by W. Davison, Alnwick, [between 1812 and 1817]

Catalog Record 

812.00.00.103

Acquired September 2019

Christmass boxes

A satire, divided into quarters, with four small scenes of different episodes of persons trying to collect their Christmas boxes. In the first square in the upper left, a plump supplicant in an apron holds out his hat to a scowling-faced man with a kerchief tied over his hat and a walking stick under his arm as they meet in a road outside a building with a lamp. Behind him on the wall is a sign posted “Miser’. In response to the request, the miser says “Give you a Christmass box. Curse you don’t I pay you for your meat.” On the top row, right, a thin man (a grave digger?) with a pipe in his mouth, bows to an obese clergyman, with a fat dog at his heel, as they stand in the graveyard of a church. The gravedigger asks, “Most worthy Parson give me a Christmass box.” The Parson replies, “Give you a halter you rascal. What should I give you a Christmass box for.” In the lower left, clergyman shakes his walking stick at a surprised man who is carrying a large box on his back and secured with a strap over his forehead. The clergyman says to the laborer, “If you ever ask me for a Christmass box again, I’ll physic you to death.” They are standing in front of building with a lantern and sign that reads “Gargle Apothycary.” The fourth square, lower right, shows old, hag-faced woman with a hat and muff standing in a parlor as she slaps the face of an astonished footman. She tells him, “Take that you saucy rascal for a Xmass box!” He replies, “What’s that for. I did not want a box on the ear, not I.”

  • PrintmakerNewton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker, artist.
  • TitleChristmass boxes [graphic] / drawn & etchd. by Rd. Newton.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, 50 Oxford St., Decemr. 25, 1794.

Catalog Record 

794.12.25.02+

Acquired May 2017

Sir Harry Trelawny diary

Sir Harry Trewlawny’s diary with the first entry dated 1785 August 17 and the last September 2nd all in a single hand. A wonderfully chatty diary in which he talks about farming matters, the crops that are being harvested, maintaining the shoreline property, as well as the management of his current holdings, acquisition of land and leases, including the potential purchase of Bochym Manor, on The Lizard. He reports on meetings with tenants and relays friendly gossip about his circle of acquaintances. He also discusses the candidates for several curacies under his control and the ministers in his neighborhood.

  • AuthorTrelawny, Harry, Sir, 1756-1834.
  • TitleManuscript diary, circa 1785.
  • ProductionLondon, 1785.

Catalog Record 

LWL Mss Vol. 237

Acquired July 2017

The historians

A lady (Mrs. Catherine Macaulay) with an aquiline profile sits at a table opposite a clergy man (Dr. Wilson) as she writes with a quill pen. The walls are lined with full bookshelves separated in the middle by a fireplace with a mantelpiece on which sits a bust of “Alfred rex”. Both figures wear the same enormous hair as in British Museum no. 5441.

  • PrintmakerDarly, Mattina, printmaker.
  • TitleThe historians [graphic] / Mattina Darly sculp.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. May 1, 1777, by MDarly, 39 Strand, [1 May 1777]

Catalog Record 

777.05.01.08

Acquired April 2018

The grounds

Satire on Robert Walpole, showing the grounds for the Motion to remove him from office.

  • TitleThe grounds [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, March 7, 1741.

Catalog Record

741.03.07.02.3+

Acquired March 2017

Majority one against the boroughmongers

lwlpr33540 (1024x751)

A satire on the electoral Reform Bill of 1831, which was passed soon after this print was issued. Grant shows the figure of blind Justice leaning out from a mass of billowing clouds and holding her scales labelled “Reform 1813”. The load on the left side labeled “People’, though containing fewer documents — Magna Carta, Economy & Retrenchment, Peace of Plenty, Extension of the Electi[c] Franchise, Cheap Government — is heavier than the other plate “Oligarchy” which is weighted down by: Bribes, Corruption, Six Acts, Corn Law, Church, Rotten Boroughs, Corporation Charters, Law & Iniquity, Taxes, Imposts, Holy Alliance, [F?]onal Debt. A group of four men in the left foreground include a judge; the one man says “Behold! a mere feather turns the ballance in our favour and saves us from revolution & disgrace.” Just beyond them in the middle distance the King stands firmly and says “The triumph of this great & vital cause will fix my crown more firm upon my head.” On the right a group of over six men including a clergyman who wipes his brow and cries “The draft is in their favor. Our cause is lost. Oh dictatorium, dictatorium, dic-“. Another gentleman behind him cries “They may vainly recken on a paltry unit, we have yet power to rent it peicemeal [sic].” In the distance a crowd cheers, and some hold signs for “Reform” and “Support the King & his ministers”, etc.

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852.
  • TitleMajority one against the boroughmongers [graphic] / C.J. Grant.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by John Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, March 26th, 1831.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

831.03.26.01+

Acquired January 2016

 

Hot cross bunns, two a penny bunns

lwlpr34238 (811x1024)

“A stout and burly woman stands at a street-door with a large basket of buns. A young woman and three children buy; the children help themselves, the woman holds a plate which she fills with buns. In the background (left) is a Georgian church with pediment and cupola; a fat parson in his surplice hurries along to escape from a woman and two children, who beg from him.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerMerke, Henri, printmaker.
  • TitleHot cross bunns, two a penny bunns [graphic] / Rowlandson delin. ; Merke sculp.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. May 4, 1799, at Ackermann’s Gallery, 101 Strand, [4 May 1799]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

799.05.04.01+

Acquired March 2016

Wife & no wife, or, A trip to the Continent

lwlpr33259 (1024x824)

“The interior of a large church or cathedral. Burke, dressed as a Jesuit, standing within a low, semicircular wall at the foot of a crucifix, marries the Prince of Wales and Mrs. Fitzherbert. The Prince is about to put the ring on her finger. Fox gives her away, holding her left wrist. Beside him (right) stands Weltje in back view but looking to the left at the ceremony. A napkin is under his left arm, bottles project from his coat-pockets, and the tags on his shoulder denote the liveried manservant. To the left of Fox appears the profile of George Hanger. On the left North sits, leaning against the altar wall, sound asleep, his legs outstretched. He wears his ribbon but is dressed as a coachman, his hat and whip beside him. All the men wear top-boots to suggest a runaway match. Behind the Prince in a choir seat is a row of kneeling monks who are chanting the marriage service. The crucifix is partly covered by a curtain, but the legs and feet are painfully distorted … On the wall and pillars of the church are four framed pictures: ‘David watching Bathsheba bathing’, ‘St. Anthony tempted by monsters’, ‘Eve tempting Adam with the apple’, and ‘Judas kissing Christ’, the last being over the head of Fox.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerGillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • TitleWife & no wife, or, A trip to the Continent [graphic] / design’d by Carlo Khan.
  • PublicationLondon : Publish’d by Willm. Holland, No. 66 Drury Lane, London, March 27, 1786.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

786.03.27.01.2++

Acquired October 2015

Account book of Rev. Miles Tarn

lwlmss000552

lwlmss000552a

A personal account book kept by Miles Tarn beginning two years before he attended Queen’s College, Oxford and ending in the year of his death 1797. He provides a biographical sketch as well as details of the births, marriages, and deaths of his eleven children by his first wife, Mary (died 26 February 1784); he traces the history of the family estate at Wray beginning in 1615. The entry recording his marriage to second wife, Grace Peele of Cocersmouth is followed by an entry (in his wife’s hand?) that records the details of the time and date of his death and details of the funeral and burial. The bulk of the manuscript details his expenses. Of particular interest are the entries for the 1750’s as he set up a home in Dean after becoming rector. Items listed include: furniture, crockery, household utensils, clothing, fruit trees and gardening tools; monies lent and wages paid to workmen.

  • AuthorTarn, Miles, 1719-1797.
  • TitleAccount book of Rev. Miles Tarn’s, Rector of Dean in Cumbria, 1735-1797.

Catalog Record

LWL Mss Vol. 212

Acquired January 2014