The man wot drives the sovereign

Wellington stands full-length in profile to the left, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip in his left hand. His (gloved) right hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect. The speech-balloon above his head reads, “While I hold the Reins (your Honnor) I’ll drive against all Opposition!!!”

  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by J.L. Marks, Artillery St., Bishopsgate, London, [ca. April 1829?]

Catalog Record 

829.04.00.13

Acquired June 2017

The party wot drives the sovereign

Queen Adelaide, side-saddle on a horse with a man’s face, Lord Grey, using spurs and a riding crop to press him into the ‘Slough of Despond’, joining other politicians including Wellington. Grey says, ” Don’t drive so hard; you will worry me to death.” A signpost ‘To Reform’ points the other way. A group behind her cry, “Go it, Addy, push him on, don’t let him make any, without he first makes us.”

  • Creator: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, lithographer.
  • TitleThe party wot drives the sovereign [graphic] / HH [monogram].
  • Publication[London] : Published by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London, 1832.

Catalog Record

832.00.00.49+

Acquired June 2017

The cad to the man wot drives the sovereign

“Peel stands directed to the left holding a dome-shaped wire cage containing rats; his left hand is on his hip. He wears a small battered hat, once a topper, a collar and stock, patched greatcoat with sheepskin collar and many pockets; loose boots to the calf. A document projects from his coat-tail pocket. Above his head: ‘I turns my hand to any thing now I ketches Rats like winking.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorHeath, William, 1795-1840.
  • TitleThe cad to the man wot drives the sovereign.
  • Published[London] : Pub. … by T. Mcfat, 26 Strawmarket [i.e. T. McLean, 26 Haymarket], April 1829.

Catalog Record

829.04.00.16+

Acquired June 2017

The theatrical atlas

Kean as Richard III, directed to the left, stands on a large volume with the word ‘Shakespear’ written on the top edge. Resting on his head and humped shoulders is a model of Drury Lane Theatre, a massive block, inscribed ‘Whitbreads Intire.’ On the roof is poised an ugly figure of Fame, blowing through a trumpet ‘Puff Puff Puff’, and holding behind her a second trumpet, from which issue the words ‘Puff Puff P’. In front straddles a tiny Whitbread, his legs and arms projecting from a cask which forms his body; he says: “Now by St Paul the work goes bravely on” (altering Richard’s words from ‘this news is bad indeed’). Kean stoops, leaning on a cross-hilted sword, inscribed ‘A Keen supporter’; he has misshapen bandy legs. He says: “Well, as you guess.” He wears an ermine-bordered cap encircled by a crown, slashed doublet and trunk hose, a sleeveless coat bordered with ermine and embroidered with a (Yorkist) rose, with flapped and spurred boots. (The figure, with the position of the arms altered, is a travesty of J.J. Hall’s portrait of Kean interrogating Stanley on the approach of Richmond. The costume is correct.) The stage is indicated by curtains flanking the design. In the background are clouds of smoke.–Adapted from British Museum.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe theatrical atlas / G. Cruikshank fec.
  • Published[London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey, St. James’s Street, May 7th, 1814.

Catalog Record

814.05.17.01+

Acquired June 2017

The whole truth, or, John Bull with his eyes opened

Caricature with Queen Caroline (left) as Lady Macbeth in the mad scene, standing in the street before two shops; she holds a candlestick raised in her right hand as she holds out her dress with her left hand, looking down horror at her skirt which is decorated with three panels with images of men and labeled “Man B”, “Austi”, “Sapio”, “Mat …”, and “Bat”. The initials “C.B” are embroidered on the trim of her knickers. Standing to her right is an astonished John Bull who holds his hat in front of his face, arm extended in horror. The shop on the left is identified by a sign below second story windows with broken glass: Wholesale Dealer in Brass Forges, Ranges, &c N.B. Odd jobs in general. The street level is shuttered, its doors covered in graffiti: Gone away, Gone abroad, Empty, M.T. The one door has a knocker in the shape of a ram’s head. John Bull stands before the second door which stands open as if he has just emerged. The windows are curtained and the building well maintained. The large sign above reads “Time & Common-Sense Occulists. N.B. Films expeditiously removed &c. Below this sign (left) is a pair of large spectacles with the two eyeballs turned towards the shop on the left and a smaller sign (right) that reads “No connexion with the next shop.”

  • PrintmakerLane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • TitleThe whole truth, or, John Bull with his eyes opened [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Feb. 1st, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.02.01.04

Acquired March 2017

The man of the woods & the cat-o’-mountain

A kitchen scene [with a satire based on the fable of the “catspaw”]. A monkey with Wood’s head squats beside a plump cat with the head in profile of Queen Caroline. She sits gazing at the fire with an eagerly expectant smile. He puts his left hand on her shoulder and takes her right paw which is supported on his knee, looking fixedly at her with greedy expectation. Between the bars of the grate are four chestnuts like large potatoes. These are inscribed respectively: ‘Privileges’, ‘Rights’, ‘Liturgy’, ‘St Catherines’. Beside the grate and attached to a chain is a ‘Kettle of Fish’. Behind the cat is a big trap with steel teeth inscribed ’50 000 per Annum’. Behind it is a dresser, neatly arranged above a cupboard inscribed ‘Lately from St Omers’ [see British Museum Satires no. 13730]. On the dresser are a teapot and butterdish, each with a bust portrait of Bergami, and two cups, inscribed ‘BB’. There are also pans inscribed ‘Hash’ and ‘Stew’, a ‘Tinder’ box and bottle of ‘Brim-Stone’. On the chimneypiece, with other utensils, is a box of ‘Matches’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerLane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • TitleThe man of the woods & the cat-o’-mountain [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., March 27, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.03.27.01

Acquired March 2017

Bat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either

Caricature with Queen Caroline on the arms of Bergami (left) and Alderman Wood (right), jubilant on the sidewalk before the door of “Mother Wood”. The Queen wears a watch at her waist and two miniature portraits hanging from cords from her bosom.

  • PrintmakerLane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • TitleBat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pub. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Jan. 19, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.01.19.02

Acquired March 2017

Park-character

“Standing whole length profile portrait of a man in an oval enclosed in a rectangle. He walks from left to right, his head thrown back, his stomach projecting. He wears spectacles, a looped hat, a large tie-wig, and holds a tasselled cane.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title:Park-character [graphic].
  • Publication:[London] : Pub. Novr. 24, 1776, by MDarly, 39 Strand, [1 May 1777]

Catalog Record 

777.11.24.01

Acquired April 2018

You see my dartur vears her hair like the Queen…

A homely, heavy-set girl (left) sits on a chair while an artist in spectacles (right) sits and sketches her in profile while her coarse mother in a mop cap smiles at the artist who looks back in surprise at her comment to him. Below is a clipping with the words, “You see my dartur vears her hair like the queen”. Possibly a satire directed at the new Queen, Victoria.

  • Creator: Heath, Henry, active 1824-1850, lithographer.
  • TitleYou see my dartur vears her hair like the Queen, consekently I should vish her to be taken as sich [graphic] / HH [monogram].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], [not before 1837?]

Catalog Record 

837.00.00.42

Acquired March 2018

The traytors coat of arms

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A broadside, anti-Jacobite, anti-Catholic and anti-French. The lilies of the French Royal arms changed to upside down frogs and the legitimacy of the Stewart line questioned by the inclusion of the bed-pan child over the priest’s shoulder.

  • TitleThe traytors coat of arms [graphic].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], publish’d September the 16th, 1746, according to act of Parliament.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

746.09.16.01++

Acquired October 2016