Die Entdeckung

description below

A German copy of Hogarth’s “The Discovery” (1743?): a scene in a bedoom where four gentlemen stand beside a curtained bed in which a black woman reclines; she reaches out to touch the chin of one of the men who has evidently just pulled back the curtain. The scene is thought to record a practical joke carried out on the lothario John Highmore by his friends: having arranged an assignation with an attractive young woman, they replaced her with a black prostitute. When he discovered the swap, on climbing into bed, they appeared from hiding. See Paulson.

  • Printmaker: Heintz, C. F., printmaker.
  • Title: Die Entdeckung [graphic] / lith. v. C. F. Heintz.
  • Publication: [Germany?] : [publisher not identified], [between 1833 and 1836]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 830.00.00.01 Box 140

Acquired January 2021

Acting magistrates committing themselves being their first appearance

see description below

“The stage of Covent Garden Theatre is seen from the right with a small part of the pit in the left foreground; the boxes and galleries adjoining the stage form the background on the left. The pittites are standing and blow trumpets, spring rattles, ring bells, and shout. Those in the crowded boxes behave in the same way; with one exception all are men. Two men occupy each of the two boxes over the stage-door; they watch passively. The musicians’ seats are empty, but candles burn beside their open music-books, and one of the orchestra stands facing the audience, threatening them with fist and baton. On the stage three men stand together addressing the audience. The man in the centre holds out a paper: ‘Riot Act’; he says: “We shall Read the riot act”. Behind them stands Kemble wearing a tail-coat and white trousers, appealing to the audience with his hands meekly together as if in prayer. Large notices and placards hang from the galleries and boxes: ‘Old Prices’ [five times]; ‘Harris will but Kemble won,t’; ‘No Kembles No more insults’; ‘Kemble remember the Dublin Tin Man’; ‘No Foreign Sofas’; ‘Iohn Bull against Iohn Kemble’; ‘No Catalani’; ‘Old Prices’ [three times]; ‘No Italian Private Boxes’; ‘£6000 for Caterwauling’; ‘Catalani’, below a print of a cat dressed as a woman, and singing ‘Me Yo’ from a music-book; ‘No Catalani!! Mountain– Billington, and Dickons for ever’; ‘Ol Price for ever No caterwauling’; ‘Old Prices No Catalani’; a gigantic placard: ‘Statement– £ Subscribed — £80-000 Fire Office — 50-000 Old Materials — 25-000 155-000 New Theatre —- 150-000 Managers of it —- 5-000′ Held up by a ‘John Bull’ in the pit who blows a trumpet: ‘No Catalani No Pigeon Holes Old Prices No Private Boxes’. A man shouts from a box: “Off Off Off Off”; he springs a rattle.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Acting magistrates committing themselves being their first appearance on this stage, as performed at the National Theatre Covent Garden, Sepr. 18, 1809 [graphic]
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [ca. September 1809]

Catalog Record

809.09.00.06++

Acquired January 2020

Buck metamorphos’d

description below

“Portrait of Samuel Foote in character; whole length, standing, wearing the latest ‘French’ fashions, including large fur muff, wig with pointed sides, mis-matched tights, and coat with over-sized cuffs; his outfit is scrutinized by two English gentlemen to the right; two men in background, one preparing a hat, bending over a dressing table with mirror.”–British Museum online catalogue.
On the back wall are two large framed pictures, both with scenes from mythology. On the left, Apollo with bow and arrow pursues Daphne who has begun the turn into a laurel tree. On the right, Leda and the swan.

  • Printmaker: Smith, Gabriel, 1724-1783, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: Buck metamorphos’d, or, Mr. Foote in the character of the Englishman return’d from Paris [graphic] / drawn & engrav’d by Gabl. Smith.
  • Publication: London : Printed for John Ryall & Robt. Withy, at Hogarth’s Head in Fleet Street, [ca. 1756]

Catalog Record

756.00.00.99+

Acquired January 2021

For the benefit of Joe Miller

description below

Copy of a benefit ticket whose design was formerly attributed to Hogarth: a stage scene with four performers in Congreve’s ‘The Old Bachelor’, showing the scene in Act III where Noll receives a kicking from Sharper; print after a forgery purporting to be a benefit ticket for Joe Miller for his performance as Sir Joseph Wittol.

 

  • Title: For the benefit of Joe Miller [graphic] : Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. The old batchelor / W. Hogarth ft.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [early 19th century?]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 800.00.00.02 Box 140

Acquired August 2020

A specimen of Mr. K**n’s acting

description below

“The actor Kean in part as Richard III appalled as his bastard son is presented to him by its mother as a beadle holds a court order for its maintenance at 7/6d a week.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Marks, John Lewis, printmaker.
  • Title: A specimen of Mr. K**n’s acting, or, A little man of great parts! [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by J.L. Marks, 37 Princes St., Soho – and 28 Fetter Lane, Fleet Street, [ca. 1820]

Catalog Record

820.00.00.114+

Acquired January 2020

The hostile press and the consequences of crim. con.

description below

“Kean, in the costume of Sir Giles Overreach, stands on the stage, indicated by a boarded floor surrounded by flame and smoke from the jaws of a semicircle of ferocious monsters, serpentine, scaly, and fanged, and with glaring eyeballs. The largest and most menacing is the Old Times, emitting Gall, Spite Venon [sic] Hypocricy. Towards this Kean directs his levelled rapier, saying, By the powers of Shakspeare, I defy ye all. He holds above his head a large open book: Shakspeare, which is irradiated. Almost as large as the ‘Times’ is the pendant to it: New Times, vomiting Hypocricy. The other monsters are not specified, they spit flames inscribed respectively: Spleen; Cant; Malignity; Slander; Spite; Envy; Malice; Nonsence; Oblique.”–British Museum catalogue.

 

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, printmaker.
  • Title: The hostile press and the consequences of crim. con., or, Shakspeare in danger / R. Cruikshank delt.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. Feby. 1825 by J. Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, [1825 February]

Catalog Record 

825.02.00.01+

Acquired January 2020

Theatre Royal

description below

A theater ticket with a scene from the play The mock doctor: Gregory, the mock doctor, holds the Charlotte’s wrist, as they look at her father who points to his mouth indicating that she is mute. The print after a forgery purporting to be an admission ticket for a performance of Fielding’s The Mock Doctor.

 

  • Title: Theatre Royal [graphic] : April [blank] a comedy with The mock doctor for the benefit of the author of the farce / W. Hogarth ft.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [early 19th century?]

Catalog Record

Hogarth 800.00.00.01

Acquired August 2020

Bucks have at ye all

description belowA theatre scene; a man on stage holding a long cane leans towards the box stage left saying: ‘Bucks of the Boxes, sneer and talk aloud! I don’t mean you.’ The rotund young man at the front of the box says ‘Boo Boo’; he holds an unfurled sheet of paper headed ‘Fair Penitent. Lothario, by the amateur who murdered Romeo …’

  • Title: Bucks have at ye all [graphic] : with extempore additions by the amateur comic-tragedian as delivered at the Haymarket Theatre Decemr. 10, 1811.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Decemr. 10th, 1811, by Wm. Holland, No. 11 Cockspur St., [10 December 1811]

Catalog Record 

811.12.10.01+

Acquired June 2019

The theatrical atlas

Kean as Richard III, directed to the left, stands on a large volume with the word ‘Shakespear’ written on the top edge. Resting on his head and humped shoulders is a model of Drury Lane Theatre, a massive block, inscribed ‘Whitbreads Intire.’ On the roof is poised an ugly figure of Fame, blowing through a trumpet ‘Puff Puff Puff’, and holding behind her a second trumpet, from which issue the words ‘Puff Puff P’. In front straddles a tiny Whitbread, his legs and arms projecting from a cask which forms his body; he says: “Now by St Paul the work goes bravely on” (altering Richard’s words from ‘this news is bad indeed’). Kean stoops, leaning on a cross-hilted sword, inscribed ‘A Keen supporter’; he has misshapen bandy legs. He says: “Well, as you guess.” He wears an ermine-bordered cap encircled by a crown, slashed doublet and trunk hose, a sleeveless coat bordered with ermine and embroidered with a (Yorkist) rose, with flapped and spurred boots. (The figure, with the position of the arms altered, is a travesty of J.J. Hall’s portrait of Kean interrogating Stanley on the approach of Richmond. The costume is correct.) The stage is indicated by curtains flanking the design. In the background are clouds of smoke.–Adapted from British Museum.

  • PrintmakerCruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker.
  • TitleThe theatrical atlas / G. Cruikshank fec.
  • Published[London] : Pubd. by H. Humphrey, St. James’s Street, May 7th, 1814.

Catalog Record

814.05.17.01+

Acquired June 2017