The smoaking club

description below“Elderly men sit and stand, all smoking long pipes; large clouds of smoke issue from their mouths, but little or nothing comes from the bowls of their pipes. Most sit or stand silently morose; two standing men (left) appear to be puffing smoke in each other’s faces. One leans back, apparently asleep, but smoking. An ugly man seated on the extreme right takes the hand of a pretty young woman who stands opposite him; he holds a large key. She slips a note into the hand of a fierce-looking military officer who stands with his back to her. On the wall (right) is a placard: ‘At a general meeting of this Society, it was resolv’d by a Majority of Independent members, that any member may be Indulg’d with having the Key brought him, by his Servant or hand-maid, but on no pretence whatever be followd by that bane of good fellowship calld the White Sergeant.’ Above the door are framed Rules: ‘Ist No Gemman to be a member of this Society who cannot smoke three pipes at one sitting – NB no Spitting 2d No members pipe to be more than 14 Inches nor less than nine unless permitted so to do by the Landlady 3d Every member to find his own Stopper 4th Any member who puffs designedly in the face of another, to be find sixpence or be puff’d at in return by the whole company 5th All fines to be spent in Porter T. Twig Secy’ On the back wall is a large print of Sir Walter Raleigh seated smoking (right) while a servant raises a bucket to fling at the smoke.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Scott, Edmund, approximately 1746-1810, printmaker.
  • Title: The smoaking club [graphic] / I. Boyne delt. ; E. Scott sculpt.
  • Publication: London : Publish’d 10 Jany. 1792 by Bull & Jeffryes, Ludgate Hill], [10 January 1792]

Catalog Record

792.01.10.03++

Acquired March 2019

The delegates in council

“Naval mutineers, seated and standing at a long table, glare ferociously at Admiral Buckner, who stands (left) calmly, hat in hand, in profile to the right at the foot of the table. The man at the head of the table, seated in a chair which is higher than the others, holds a blunderbuss and wears a hat. He must be Richard Parker, but does not resemble him. At his elbow and on the extreme right stands Thelwall filling a glass from a ‘Grog’ can; he says “Tell him we intend to be Masters, I’ll read him a Lecture”; from his pocket hangs a paper: ‘Thellwals Lecture’ (see British Museum Satires No. 8685). One man only is seated on the president’s left and on the near side of the table. He places a fist on a long paper headed ‘Resolutions’. Under the table in the foreground, lifting up the tablecloth, five secret instigators are (left to right): Lauderdale, holding a paper: ‘Letter from Sheerness to Ld L——le’; Horne Tooke, Stanhope, Grey, Fox, the most prominent, saying, “Aye, Aye, we are at the bottom of it”, and Sheridan. All have satisfied smiles. Four ruffians are seated at the farther side of the table, others stand behind them; one aims a pistol over the admiral’s head, one man smokes, another chews tobacco, taking a quid from his box. Weapons lie on the table. On the wall behind them are a print of Britannia head downwards, and two torn ballads: ‘True Blue an old Song’ and ‘Hearts of Oak are our Ships Jolly Tars are our men We alway are Ready’, the last word scored through. On the right the slanting window of the captain’s cabin is indicated.”–British Museum online catalogue

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: The delegates in council, or, Beggars on horseback [graphic] / I. Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: London : Published by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, June 9, 1797.

Catalog Record 

797.06.09.03+

Acquired June 2019

 

ll faut des epoux assortis dans les liens du mariage

see description below“Husband and wife dressing in a bedroom, the tent-shaped bed-curtains forming a background. The woman is thin and has a mole on her face, the man broad, but their deficiencies are similar. She stands (left), about to raise her shift and adjust false posteriors. A false bust, false teeth, and wig, simulating natural curls, are on the table behind her, on which are also the man’s wig and an eye in a tumbler of water. Both are bald. He sits (right) in shirt and breeches, about to put on a pair of stockings with false calves of fleece. Both register sour dissatisfaction with themselves and each other.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of an earlier state.

  • Title: ll faut des epoux assortis dans les liens du mariage [graphic] = Persons in wedlock should be properly matched.
  • Publication: London : Pub. Jan. 20, 1820 by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [20 January 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.01.20.02+

Acquired June 2019

Bucks have at ye all

description belowA theatre scene; a man on stage holding a long cane leans towards the box stage left saying: ‘Bucks of the Boxes, sneer and talk aloud! I don’t mean you.’ The rotund young man at the front of the box says ‘Boo Boo’; he holds an unfurled sheet of paper headed ‘Fair Penitent. Lothario, by the amateur who murdered Romeo …’

  • Title: Bucks have at ye all [graphic] : with extempore additions by the amateur comic-tragedian as delivered at the Haymarket Theatre Decemr. 10, 1811.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Decemr. 10th, 1811, by Wm. Holland, No. 11 Cockspur St., [10 December 1811]

Catalog Record 

811.12.10.01+

Acquired June 2019

The good man at the hour of death

see description belowAn allegorical print with two tableaux illustrating on the right, the end of a righteous life and on the left the end of the life of a man who made wealth his object of faith. The religious man in bed surrounded by books and against the background of an attractive library, is greeted by the winged figure of Time clutching a scythe and an hourglass. In contrast, the greedy man, his gouty leg wrapped in bandages and resting on a stool, recoils against the figure of a spear-wielding skeleton, upsetting his table.

  • Title: The good man at the hour of death [graphic] ; The bad man at the hour of death.
  • Publication: [London] : Sold by C. Sheppard, No. 19 Lambeth Hill, Doctors Commons, London, [between 1786 and 1791]

Catalog Record

786.00.00.83

Acquired June 2019

Simptoms of courage!

see description below

“British troops are about to march through a large fortified gate leading from open country (left) to the town of Buenos Ayres, where confused street-fighting is in progress. Can are fired from the battlements of the gate at the soldiers, some of whom lie dead or wounded. In the foreground an officer (mounted), in conversation with others, asks: “where is the General”; others say: “go look for the General”; “Find the General”; “why the General is lost”. A Highland officer, taking snuff (right), slyly; “I dare say he is varra safe.” From the country (left) three mounted men gallop, all saying, “I come for Orders”. In the background Whitelocke’s head and shoulders are seen peeping over a hillock on the extreme left. He says: “He that fights and runs away, May live to fight another day, But he thats in the Battle slain, Will never live to fight again”. In the distance, behind him, are tiny (British) soldiers in close formation. In the city men are firing and hurling stones from the roofs of flat-roofed houses on British soldiers in the plaza. On the wall (right) is a placard: ‘Lost, or Mis-led a General officer Who ever can [give] Information … ampl[y] rewarded.'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: Simptoms of courage! [graphic] / G. Whiteliver del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 50 Piccadilly, March 26, 1808.

Catalog Record

808.03.26.01+

Acquired June 2019

The Princes disastar

The Princes disastar. Detailed description below

“The Prince of Wales falls from an overturning phaeton or curricle. He is about to fall on the prostrate body of Mrs. Fitzherbert (left), who lies on her back, her breasts exposed, in an attitude intended to be indecorous. She lies under a steep bank or rock beside a country road. The horse rears behind the Prince.”–British Museum online catalogue.

 

  • Title: The Princes disastar [sic], or, A fall in Fitz [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published by James Aitken, Little Russell Court, Drury Lane, [July 1788]

Catalog Record 

788.07.00.08+

Acquired April 2019

At a court of emergency of the Hon. Artillery-Company…

At a court of emergency of the Hon. Artillery-Company...

  • Author: Great Britain. Army. Honourable Artillery Company of London. Court of Emergency.
  • Uniform Title: [Regulations. 1794-08-21]
  • Title: At a court of emergency of the Hon. Artillery-Company, held at the Mansion-House, on Thursday, August 21, 1794, at three o’clock in the morning: on a requisition from the Right Hon. the Lord-Mayor, for the purpose of assisting the civil power, resolved, that the Company do appear completely armed and accoutred, with two spare flints, in the artillery-ground this evening, at five o’clock precisely, and that every member be required to assign substantial reason for absence. By order of the said Court of Assistants, William White, clerk.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified] [1794]

Catalog Record 

File 63 794 At861

Acquired April 2019

The green bag, it’s contents & all it’s appendages

The green bag. Detailed description below.

“A hand, ‘Manus Populi’, extends into the design from the upper margin, holding a chain from which hangs a pair of scales. On one (right), close to the ground, sits the Queen, hands crossed on her breast, saying: “My innocence will support me & my Country will protect me– 10 Great Men against one unprotected Woman are fearful odds.” The other scale, high in the air, is completely filled by a green bag, see British Museum Satires No. 13735, from the mouth of which emerges the head of George IV, crowned. Attached to the beam, by a rope round his neck, hangs a military officer, holding a huge key; as a makeweight he dangles vainly against the left side of the King’s bag. Three men standing below pull at the scale, trying to drag it down: they are Sidmouth (left), a judge in back view (? Leach), and Castlereagh (right), who says: “We cannot do it, and I told you so at first, & if she opens her bagwe shall be stifled all of us.” The King looks down at them with a distressed expression, saying: “Pull you lubbers.””–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heeston, active 1820, printmaker.
  • Title: The green bag, it’s contents & all it’s appendages are insufficient to turn the scale of public opinion [graphic] / Heeston fect.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by S.W. Fores, 41 Piccadilly, July 11, 1820.

Catalog Record 

820.07.11.01+

Acquired April 2019

Mother Cole

Queen Caroline, bedraggled and drunk as she sits slouched in an arm chair

Caricature of Queen Caroline, bedraggled and drunk as she sits slouched in an arm chair, her foot resting on a stool; she wears a hat with three ostrich feathers and around her neck hangs a small portrait (indistinct image) and holds a large glass of brandy while a servant (Alderman Wood wearing the fur-trimmed robes), his eyes cross-eyed, stands beside the chair in attendance with a decanter in hand.

  • Printmaker: Lane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • Title: Mother Cole [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., July 23, 1821.

Catalog Record 

821.07.23.01

Acquired March 2019