A perspective of Westminster Abbey from the High Altar

“The coronation of James II; interior of Westminster Abbey, the crowning of the king at bottom centre.”–British Museum online catalogue.
“One of a series of four prints, all based on the large plates in Sandford’s ‘History of the Coronation’, first published by Bowles as a composite plate in the series ‘London Described’ (see Adams 29.8). The plate used in Sandford’s book had a shorter title, no text in lower margin, and was inscribed ‘W Sherwin sculp’.”–Curator’s comments, British Museum online

  • Title: A perspective of Westminster Abbey from the High Altar to the west end [graphic] : shewing the manner of His Majesties crowning; also the manner of disposing seating & placing several of the persons who came in the proceeding &c. Exactly taken from Sandford.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for T. Bowles in St. Pauls Church Yard, & John Bowles & Son at the Black Horse in Cornhil, [between 1752 and 1764]

Catalog Record

752.00.00.21

Acquired September 2019

Queen Carolines triumph on the defeat

see description belowQueen Caroline is seated in a carriage pulled by two white horses lead by a young page towards the right; she holds a walking-stick in her hand, sceptor-like over her shoulder and wears a fashionable hat and a small smile on her face as she looks out at the viewer. She is accompanied by two men in armor and wearing plummed helmets. The one on the far-side of the carriage holds a sign “The people and the Queens Guards”. Another sign in the background on the right reads “It is better to put your trust in the Lord than confidence in princes.” A crown is shown on the far right.

  • Title: Queen Carolines triumph on the defeat of the Bill of Pains and Penalties, Novr. 10, 1820 [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Publish’d by W.B. Walker, 4 Fox & Knot Court, Cow Lane, London, [not before 10 November 1820]

Catalog Record 

820.11.10.01 Framed

Acquired September 2019

The fair bather

see description belowIn the woods beside a stream a young woman bather removes her last stocking while a young man hidden among the reeds looks at her with pleasure.

  • Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker.
  • Title: The fair bather [graphic] / Boucher ; Rowlandson 1799.
  • Publication: [London?] : [publisher not identified], [1799]

Catalog Record

799.00.00.56

Acquired June 2019

The wonderful strong and surprizing Persian dwarf

description below“Portrait of a Persian dwarf, full-length, slightly turned to the left, holding up ropes tied to his hair, dressed in a frockcoat with the skirts buttoned back and with a Turkish hat on his head, a large weight at his side, a harlequin pointing to an advertisement for the dwarf on a shed beyond, the whole surrounded by scrolling rococo foliate and shell designs.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The wonderful strong and surprizing Persian dwarf [graphic] : 3 foot 6 inches high, born in Persia, is fifty six years old, speaks eighteen languages, sings Italian, dances to admiration and with the ropes ty’d to his hair, when put over his shoulders lifts the great stone A.
  • Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1740?]

Catalog Record 

740.00.00.65+

Acquired June 2019

The celebrated Clark

see description below“Mrs. Clarke auctions commissions from a rostrum to a crowd of bidders, while the Duke of York acts as her clerk. All are unconscious of a net in which they are enclosed, and with which the Devil flies off into flames (right). Mrs. Clarke (right), in profile to the left, with raised hammer, holds out a paper headed Commission. She says: Going for no more than £500 a Commission Positively worth 5000. An officer, probably Dowler, see British Museum satires no. 11253, holds out his arms towards her, saying, my dear dear dear Angel Knock it down to me or I am ruin’d. Another says: Let the good Bishop [the Duke, see British Museum satires no. 11227] have the Game & we my Boy will have the Cream. The other applicants are in civilian dress; one says to the bidder: my dear fellow dont be so anxious for depend upon it these tricks will be Found out & all will be Lost. The Duke of York, in uniform, records the bids in a book, his pen resting on the figure 500. He says Thus am I content to record & ratify the Destruction of the Army, my Country & myself, rather than loose my dear DARLING to [cf. British Museum satires no. 11228]. The Devil looks over his shoulder at Mrs. Clarke to say with a baleful grin: Going, Going Gon you may now say, for I have You tight enough my dear Honey.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The celebrated Clark, exalted to the pulpit by the humility of a royal bishop [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. 22nd April 1809 by J.H. Warl, London, [22 April 1809]

Catalog Record 

809.04.22.01+

Acquired September 2019

 

Her Majesty Queen Caroline landing at Dover

Queen Caroline walks down a plank balanced between a jolly boat and the shore; she is assisted by her son-in-law Prince Leopald, dressed in black. A cheering crowd stands on the beach, waving their hats in the air, behind an officer who tips his hat at the Queen. Sailors push the boat onto the shingle while a ship called “Prince Leopold” (in reference to her son-in-law) is anchored in the distance.

  • Title: Her Majesty Queen Caroline landing at Dover, on the 5th of June, 1820, after an absence of 5 years, to demand her rights, dignities, & priveleges as Queen of England [graphic] : dedicated to the feelings of the British Nation, by W.B. Walker.
  • Publication: [London] : [W.B. Walker], [not before 5 June 1820]

Catalog Record

820.06.05.01+ Framed

Acquired September 2019

 

Arrogance (or nonchalance) of the Tenth retorted

see description below

“Two designs side by side. BALL ROOM. A repetition of British Museum satires no. 14646 [2]. The M.C. has no wand, but holds an opera-hat; he says: ‘Will you accept of this Lady for a partner, Sir?’ The hussar, who lounges with hands in pockets and both legs over the back of a chair, answers: ‘Shew her off!–Trot her out!! let us see her foine legs’. A civilian standing behind the lady (left) laughs: ‘Ha! Ha! Ha! So this is one of the extra polite Dandies of the Tenth‘. Two fellow officers stand beside the first. One says: ‘No! Tenth don’t daunce!!’ [cf. British Museum satires no. 14643A]. The other inspects the lady through an eyeglass, saying, ‘Zounds, Dam-me!’ DRAWING ROOM. The lady of the ball-room stands beside another; both are young and pretty and in ball-dress. The officer (right) bows from the waist, pointing the left toe, left hand on hip and holding up an eye-glass. He is without pelisse and sword. The second lady, holding up a fan, says: ‘Sir this is the Lady you desired me to Trot up to you.’ The lady in question also bends from the waist, pointing a toe, inspecting the officer through an eye-glass. She holds a lighted candle, saying, ‘No–Wont do! Trot him out!!–Trot him out!!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, printmaker.
  • Title: Arrogance (or nonchalance) of the Tenth retorted [graphic] / R. Cruikshank fecit.
  • Publication: London : Pubd. April 1824 by J. Fairburn, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, [April 1824]

Catalog Record 

824.04.00.02+

Acquired August 2019

 

Jack Shepherd drawn from [the] life

description belowView of the interior of the cell on the left: Portrait of John (‘Jack’) Sheppard, whole length, seated on a chair in prison cell at Newgate, with hands and feet in chains, shackled to the floor, leaning to left, looking up at sunlight streaming through the window at right; wearing hat, jacket, waistcoat, breeches, stockings and buckled shoes, cloak or blanket over chair back and on floor; broken chimney where he escaped at top left. On the right, eleven images showing details of John (‘Jack’) Sheppard’s escape from prison on 15 October 1724, including the locks, bolts and doors he broke open, the hole he made in the chimney, and climbing over the outer walls of Newgate prison.

  • Title: Jack Shepherd drawn from [the] life [graphic] ; An exact representation of [the] holes Shepherd made in [the] chimney and of [the] locks bolts & doors he broke open in makeing his wonderfull escape out of Newgate, Oct. [the] 15th, 1724, between 4 in [the] afternoon & 1 in [the] morng.
  • Publication: [London] : Printed for and sold by T. Bowles, print seller next the Chapter House in St. Pauls Ch. Yard & J. Bowles, print seller over against Stocks Market, [1724?]

Catalog Record 

724.00.00.02++

Acquired June 2019

The funeral procession of the rump

see description below

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878, printmaker, artist.
  • Title: The funeral procession of the rump [graphic] / G. Cruikshank invt. et fect.
  • Publication: [London] : Pubd. March 22d, 1819, by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., London, [22 March 1819]

Catalog Record

Drawer 819.03.22.03

Acquired June 2019

 

The delegates in council

“Naval mutineers, seated and standing at a long table, glare ferociously at Admiral Buckner, who stands (left) calmly, hat in hand, in profile to the right at the foot of the table. The man at the head of the table, seated in a chair which is higher than the others, holds a blunderbuss and wears a hat. He must be Richard Parker, but does not resemble him. At his elbow and on the extreme right stands Thelwall filling a glass from a ‘Grog’ can; he says “Tell him we intend to be Masters, I’ll read him a Lecture”; from his pocket hangs a paper: ‘Thellwals Lecture’ (see British Museum Satires No. 8685). One man only is seated on the president’s left and on the near side of the table. He places a fist on a long paper headed ‘Resolutions’. Under the table in the foreground, lifting up the tablecloth, five secret instigators are (left to right): Lauderdale, holding a paper: ‘Letter from Sheerness to Ld L——le’; Horne Tooke, Stanhope, Grey, Fox, the most prominent, saying, “Aye, Aye, we are at the bottom of it”, and Sheridan. All have satisfied smiles. Four ruffians are seated at the farther side of the table, others stand behind them; one aims a pistol over the admiral’s head, one man smokes, another chews tobacco, taking a quid from his box. Weapons lie on the table. On the wall behind them are a print of Britannia head downwards, and two torn ballads: ‘True Blue an old Song’ and ‘Hearts of Oak are our Ships Jolly Tars are our men We alway are Ready’, the last word scored through. On the right the slanting window of the captain’s cabin is indicated.”–British Museum online catalogue

  • Printmaker: Cruikshank, Isaac, 1756?-1811?, printmaker.
  • Title: The delegates in council, or, Beggars on horseback [graphic] / I. Cruikshank del.
  • Publication: London : Published by S.W. Fores, N. 50 Piccadilly, June 9, 1797.

Catalog Record 

797.06.09.03+

Acquired June 2019