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Welcome to the Berro lab!

The Berro lab develops experimental and quantitative methods for cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics to understand the molecular mechanisms of fundamental cellular processes. Our research is currently focused on unraveling how the molecular machinery of clathrin-mediated endocytosis generates forces to deform the plasma membrane and conversely how this machinery senses membrane tension and adapts to it.

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New paper from the Berro lab!

The preprint of our new single-molecule study of the eisosome Bar protein Pil1p is now available on bioRxiv

Lacy M, Baddeley D, Berro J
New single-molecule imaging of the eisosome BAR domain protein Pil1p reveals filament-like dynamics.
bioRxiv
BIORXIV/2016/092536

Abstract
Molecular assemblies can have highly heterogeneous dynamics within the cell, but the limitations of conventional fluorescence microscopy can mask nanometer-scale features. We have developed a novel, broadly applicable, fluorescent labeling and imaging protocol, called Single-molecule Recovery After Photobleaching (SRAP), which allowed us to reveal the heterogeneous dynamics of the eisosome, a multi-protein structure on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane in fungi. By fluorescently labeling only a small fraction of cellular Pil1p, the core eisosome BAR domain protein in fission yeast, we visualized whole eisosomes and, after photobleaching, recorded the binding of individual Pil1p molecules with ~20 nm precision. Further analysis of these dynamic structures and comparison to computer simulations allowed us to show that Pil1p exchange is spatially heterogeneous, supporting a new model of the eisosome as a dynamic filament.